Tag: war

In Remembrance.

In Remembrance.

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Being from a dedicated military family, this is a somber time of year for us, in remembrance of those in our families who have served, or worse yet, who we lost during military service.

 

The relationships to our children, Erin and Stuart, are in italics following the excerpt.


Remembering those we lost in battle:

 

Coon, David 1843

  • Elisha Cadwallader (1840-1862) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • Private Joseph Turmaine (1889-1916) – First World War(great granduncle)
    • The 27th Battalion, Winnipeg Regiment left at 2 pm, September 14, 1916 for brigade headquarters, arriving at 5 pm. They then left brigade headquarters at 9 pm and proceeded to the front line to take up position in assembly trenches, which was delayed due to congestion of the trenches…

 

Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery


Veterans in our family who later passed away:

 

 

Cadwalader, General John Cadwalader (Revolutionary War)

  • General John Cadwalader (1742-1785) – Revolutionary War (3rd cousin, 11x removed)
  • Nathan “Hoppity-Kickity” Porter (1742-1815) – French and Indian War (7th great grandfather)

 

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

  • Governor Isaac Shelby (1750-1826) – Revolutionary War, War of 1812 (1st cousin, 8x removed)
    • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada
  • Private John Jaquish (1753-1845) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)
  • Quartermaster Joseph Shelby (1787-1846) – Indian Wars (5th great grandfather)
  • James Shreve (rank unknown) (1754-1839) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)

 

Cadwalader, Gen. Thomas.jpg

  • General Thomas Cadwalader (1779-1841) – War of 1812. (3rd cousin 10x removed)

 

Jaques, William H

  • William Henry Jaques (1820-1913) – Civil War (4th great granduncle)
  • Laurent Jude Melanson (1820-1914) – Fenian Raids (3rd great grandfather)
  • Alfred E. Melanson (c. 1847-?) – Fenian Raids (2nd great granduncle)
  • Private Robinson Coke “Boby” Jones (1822-1897) – Mexican War (4th great grandfather)
  • Private William Seth Cadwallader (1825-    ) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • John Mumby Blythe (1831-    ) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Private Francis Elmer Keefer (1839-1863) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Charles George Blythe (1840-1914) – Civil War(3rd great grandfather)
    • …his descendants remained in the Louth and Somercotes areas of Lincolnshire until the emigration of his great grandson Thomas Blyth and Thomas’  sons Charles George (3rd great grandfather to Erin and Stuart), John Mumby and Robert to America…

 

Keefer, Lenard Scott 2 (maybe) proof needed

  • Leonard Scott Keefer (1841-1916) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)

 

Wedding of Elam Dennis Matthews St.

  • William Dennis Matthews (1875-1940) – Spanish American War(2nd great grandfather)
    • Bip, Fred, White and I went down to the armory this evening The Governor’s (Tanner) order, for all Illinois regiments to move to Springfield was read and great applause followed. Came home about 9 o’clock and packed up my belongings…
  • Clayton William Blythe (1883-1943) – First World War (2nd great grandfather)
    • The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records.
  • Wesley Elmer Blythe (1890-1977) – First World War (2nd great granduncle)
  • Hervé “Hervey” Turmel (1894-    ) – First World War (4th cousin, 3x removed)

 

Luther Gummeson

  • Private Luther Gummeson (1895-1934) – First World War (great granduncle)
    • Before enlisting for military service on December 10, 1917, he was a Lutheran and a farmer in Vancouver, BC. Rumour had it that his early death was attributed to being gassed during WWI. Before his death, Luther was living in the Peace River area…
  • Joseph Antonio Tumel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Alfred Turmel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Chester C. Blythe (1908-1995) – General Service (great grandfather)
  • Doyle Clement Cadwallader (1925-1944) (6th cousin, 5x removed)
    • “In the midst of life we are in death.
      In the moment that ye think not,
      In the twinkling of an eye,
      The Angel of Death may appear.”
    • The foregoing quotation seems to me very fitting for Doyle Clement Cadwallader, whose death was caused by an automobile accident while he was returning home on September 30, 1944…

 

Dad, c. 1955.


Veterans in our family who are still living:

 

Marsh-at-Night-at-Cabin-Small.jpg

 

Mark and I with my Mom and Dad at our wedding.

 

For more facts and dates about the above mentioned individuals, check out our family’s extensive genealogy database linked in the menu bar above.


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Transcription: A List of Children at the State House in Philadelphia; June 19, 1761

Transcription: A List of Children at the State House in Philadelphia; June 19, 1761

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A List of Children at the State House in Philadelphia; June 19, 1761

 

By AUTHORITY.

A LIST of CHILDREN now at the State-Houfe, in Philadelphia, who in the Courfe of the War, were taken Captives from feveral Parts of this Province by the Indians, and have been lately releafed by His Excellency General  A M H E R S T, and fent to this Government, in order to their being delivered up to their Parents, or other Relations, who are hereby d?????? forthwith to come and receive them.

Advertisement re children taken hostage by Indians
Advertisement re children taken hostage by Indians.

NICHOLAS SILVIAS, of Plow-Park.

JOHN MAN, of Marsh-Creek.

FREDERICK PAYER, of Low-Bergen.

ISAAC TOOPLE, taken near Prefque Ifle.

ANNE COON, and MARY WILLIAMS, taken on the Delaware.

Philadelphia, June 19, 1761.

from the Pennsylvania Gazette.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

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Although both sides of my family are ‘French Canadian,’ my mother’s ancestors are Acadians who settled in the maritime provinces and the eastern seaboard of the United States. Dad, however, is the link to our Québecois French Canadian and military heritage.
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine at 3 circa 1938.

In earlier posts about our family’s WWI war casualties, I discussed our family’s attachment to the Canadian military. My own father, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine, was an Instrument Electrical Technician in the Canadian Armed Forces for almost thirty years.

Gerard Turmaine in full pipe bank regalia playing his snare drum.
Gerard Turmaine in full pipe band regalia playing his snare drum.

Born in 1934 to Henry Joseph Turmaine and Rose Amande Emery of Quebec, he was nephew to both family members we lost in WWI, Joseph Philias Albert Emery (Rose’s brother) and Joseph Turmaine (Henry’s half-brother). (See photo at right of Gerry Turmaine at age 3.) As a new Canadian forces member, he spent some time in New Brunswick visiting the family of another recruit, Paul Melanson and met my mother, Patricia Gail Melanson – Paul’s sister.

Shortly after, he was transferred to Baden Söllingen, Germany and a long distance relationship proceeded for a while until he eventually asked my mother to go over and marry him. She traveled over on ship, they were married, and just over a year later I was born.

A year after my birth, my father was posted to Trenton, Ontario by the Canadian military, where we lived for ten years. During this time, he was a member of the national military pipe band (see photo at left) and frequently played all around the nation – and on one occasion, I can remember him traveling to Washington, DC to play.  During the ten years we lived in Trenton, my parents had three more girls, my sisters Renee, Andrea and Danielle.

We finally left Trenton when my parents’ dream came true and we were transferred to Comox, British Columbia. I can remember my parents talking about how much they’d like to live on the west coast of Canada for years. As a matter of fact, the story told ever after was that my Dad was so happy at the news of our transfer to British Columbia he wore holes in his socks dancing around the coffee table.

Their intention to remain in British Columbia was evident when my Dad told his superiors in Comox that he would rather forego any further promotions in order to remain in British Columbia until he retired. My parents lived in Comox until his death in 2005.

Turmaine Family in the late 1960's.
Turmaine family photo with Gerry in rear on the right; middle: Renee, Christine, Gail and Andrea; front: Danielle.

Twenty years ago I met my husband while he was training in Comox. He was an Aviation Technician with the Canadian Armed Forces and retired in 2006 to take a position with Marshall Aerospace in Abbotsford, British Columbia – where he could continue to work on his favorite aircraft, the CC130 Hercules.

To add to the tradition, my husband’s father, Marsh Blythe, retired in the 1980’s as a Sergeant in the Canadian army and my sister Andrea’s husband Larry Potter also retired several years ago from the Canadian army.


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Transcription: Sworn Statement regarding the Birth of Matthew Coon

Transcription: Sworn Statement regarding the Birth of Matthew Coon

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The following is my transcription of the Sworn Statement regarding the birth of Matthew Coon.

State of Wisconsin
County of Waushara

Mrs. Mary Russell & Sarah Bradway being duly sworn upon their oaths say that they reside in said County and state that are acquainted with Isabel A. Coon widow of David Coon of Co A Batt Regt Wis Vols, and was acquainted with the said David in his lifetime.

That they were present at the births of Matthew E. Coon child of the said David and Isabel A. and know that he was born on the 3 day of November 1861 at the town of Bloomfield in said County and State.

They further say that they have no intent in any application in which this may relate.

Mary Russell

Sworn and subscribed before me this 27th day of February 1867 and I certify the affiants to be credible persons and that I have no intent in the claim of said Isabel A. for increase of pension  the word Poysippi erased & Bloomfield enten????? before signing —

James Russell  Justice of the Peace

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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We can honor our ancestral war heroes on the internet.

We can honor our ancestral war heroes on the internet.

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Memorial wall for Isaac Shelby

I take great pride in our family’s military history in both Canada and the United States and have been researching our ancestral war heroes for decades now.

There is a special emotional connection with these people that is not there for others and it’s based in my own appreciation for them and their sacrifices on behalf of the rest of us.

I just learned that Fold3 has launched ” The Honor Wall “, a memorial site dedicated to those who served in the military forces in the United States throughout history.

Right away, I had to check it out and found pages for some of our ancestors including General Hiram Ulysses S. Grant, Major General Isaac Shelby, Private David Coon, Private Alanson Adams, and Private Alonzo Beckwith Coon, to name a few. To learn more about these and any of our other ancestors who served their countries, you can search in either of the search boxes in the sidebar for this site or for the Blythe Genealogy database site.

I have added a few photos and data to the Honor Wall at Fold3 and intend to add more. It will, however, take some time.
This site will be an amazing resource for educating future generations about the service and sacrifices of our military service personnel over the centuries.

The Fold3 Blog has more about the Honor Wall.


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We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

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We must fight for our veterans.
poppy field

Remembrance Day is fast approaching and this is one very important day I always recognize with a post on this blog.

My family’s history is well-entrenched in military service.

  • My father was in the military for 30 years.
  • My father-in-law was in the military for over 30 years.
  • My husband, Mark served 20 years.

They all served tours in hostile environments.

Our family have also lost two family members in WWI, one being Pte Philias Joseph Albert Emery during advance actions at Vimy Ridge, and the other being Pte Joseph Turmaine in the Battle of Courcelette.

I have always thought that our government was not doing enough to help veterans who are disabled as a result of their duties.

I’m appalled to say that under this present Conservative government, instead of improving, the conditions and treatment of our valued veterans are much, much worse.

Reading this post at Change.org prompted me to write about his myself and I encourage everyone to go online at the Change.org site to sign the petition demanding better financial, physical and mental health care, and administrative treatment of our veterans.

This video of a rant by Rick Mercer on behalf of our veterans is a good example of just one area of concern.

Author credit: Christine Blythe, Feathering the Empty Nest Blog

photo credit: Dukas.Ju via photopin cc


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Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

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Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England was born 17/18 June 1239, eldest son of Henry III, King of England (1207-1272) and Eléonore de Provence (1223- ), in Westminster Palace, London.

 

Edward I, King of England
Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

Edward was created Earl of Chester and granted the Dukedom of Gascony on 14 February 1254, after arriving in France.

Leonore de Castile
Leonore de Castile

Edward’s father arranged his  marriage to Infanta doña Leonor de Castile y León (1240-1290) with an eye to preventing the barons obtaining help for their rebellion from Castile. What started as an arranged marriage on 18 October 1254 at Abbey of Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain, later became a love match. Leonore was born to Infante don Fernando, III, de Castilla y León, King of Castile, Toledo and Extremadura from his second marriage to Jeanne, de Dammartin, Comtesse de Ponthieu.

Their children were:

Eleonore (1264-1297)
Joan, of England ( -1265)
John, of England ( – )
Henry, of England (1267-1274)
Julian (1271-1271)
Katherine of England (1271- )
Joan D’Acre, of England ( -1307)
Alfonso, Earl of Chester (1273-1284)
Margaret (1275-1318)
Berengaria, of England (1276-1276)
Mary, of England (1278-1332)
Alice ( – )
Isabella (1279-1279)
Elizabeth (1282-1316)
Edward, II, King of England (1284-1327)
Beatrice (1286-1286)
Blanche (1290- )

Edward initially supported the rebellious barons under Simon, de Montfort, Earl of Leicester (26th great grandfather to Mark). He later changed to support his father, served and was taken prisoner at the Battle of Lewes on 14 May 1264 by Simon de Montfort’s rebel Barons, but escaped after only 12 days on 16 May 1264. With the objective of making peace and ending the war, Edward gave Simon de Montfort the Earldom of Chester on 24 Dec 1264. The Earldom of Chester was restored to Edward after he killed Simon de Montfort at the battle of Evesham, on 4 Aug 1265.

Although originally planning to join Louis IX, King of France (27th great grandfather to Mark) in Tunisia in the summer of 1270, his plans were changed upon hearing the news of the King’s death when he arrived in Africa. After spending the winter with King Charles in Sicily, he sailed for Acre, Palestine,  to join the seventh crusade, landing on 9 May 1271.

Lacking resources against the Mameluk Sultan Baibars, he and the Sultan signed a peace agreement at Caesarea on 22 May 1272.

In an assassination attempt, Edward I was stabbed him with a poisoned dagger. Although he survived, the effects of the poison left him incapacitated until he left Acre to return to England 22 September 1272. He succeeded his father as Edward I, ‘Longshanks’, King of England while stopped in Sicily during his return from the Crusade.

He returned to England just prior to being crowned King of England on 19 Aug 1274 at Westminster Abbey in London.
Edward turned out to be a strong king and managed to increase the power and influence of the crown at a high cost to the Barons.

Caernarvon Castle
Caernarvon Castle

In 1277, Edward initiated a war with Llewelyn ap Gruffydd (25th great grandfather to Mark), ruler of Wales, and husband to Eleanor de Montfort, the daughter of Simon de Montfort, after Llewelyn he refused to submit to the English crown. As a result, the dominions of Llewelyn were halved. In 1282, Llewelyn’s brother David rebelled. Llewelyn joined him in the revolt but was soon killed in a small foray. With no leader remaining, Wales became annexed by England in 1284, and soon after, Edward saw several large castles built including Caernarvon, Harlech and Conway, to prevent any further revolt. Edward resided in Caernarvon Castle, Caernarvonshire, Wales, where his own son Edward II, future King of England, was born in 1284.

Edward Longshanks I presiding over parliament.
Edward I presiding over parliament.

In 1290, the same year Edward I lost his wife Leonore, the royal line of Scotland ended, and Edward agreed to arbitrate the negotiations with claimants to the throne of Scotland on condition that he was recognized as overlord of Scotland. In the end, the Scots acted against him, allying with France. To support his efforts to resolve the situations in Scotland and Wales, Edward formed the ‘Model Parliament’, the forerunner to following parliaments. Buoyed by this support, Edward was able to quell the Welsh rebellion in the field, conquering northwest Wales and ending the rule of the native Princes of Wales, naming his own son Prince of Wales. After his invasion and conquest of Scotland in 1296, he named himself King of Scotland and began a rather brutal, ruthless rule. In 1298, he was again called to invade Scotland to suppress a new revolt under Sir Walliam Wallace. Although victorious at the Battle of Falkirk, he was unable to win the war.

In 1299, peace was made with France and Edward married Marguerite de France (1275-1318), daughter of Philippe III, King of France (son to Louis IX above, and 26th great grandfather to Mark) and his second wife Marie de Brabant, on 8/9 September 1299 at Canterbury Cathedral.

Free of conflict with France, he again attempted to conquer Scotland in 1303. Sir William Wallace was captured and executed in 1305, only for another revolt to start up, this time successful and culminating in Robert Bruce’s coronation as King of Scotland.

Edward once again sought to subdue the Scottish, but before he could, he died 8 July 1307 near Carlisle and was buried 28 October 1307 at Westminster Abbey in London.

John Fines, author of “Who’s Who in the Middle Ages” describes Edward Longshanks I, King of England as:

Son and father of weak and ineffectual kings, Edward I had many fine qualities which seem to make nonsence of heredity. He was tall and strong, a fine horseman and a doughty warrior. A great leader of men, he was also able to lead to success. He was interested in government and law in a very genuine way. As a personality he was pious, but easily provoked to rage and often vindictive. He was fond of games—so passionately did he love his hawks that when they were ill he sent money to shrines to pray for their recovery. He was generous to the poor, and often a gay companion: he played chess, and loved music and acrobats; once he bet his laundress Matilda that she couldn’t ride his charger, and she won! Every Easter Monday he paid ransom to his maids if they found him in bed. He loved his two wives, and fussed over their health and that of his children with a pathetic concern—sometimes threatening the doctor with what would happen to him if his patient did not recover. His people feared, respected and remembered him.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  2. Gary Boyd Roberts, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983).
  3. T. H. Owen, Compiler, Cross Index of Ancestral Roots of 60 American Colonists and Supplement (Supplement by Frederick Weiss,). David Faris, The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists (English Ancestry Series, Vol. I, Second Edition; New England Historic Genealogy Society, 1999).
  4. John Fines, Who’s Who in the Middle Ages (New York: Barnes and Noble Books, 1995).
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Th.D., The Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.), 5th Ed., c1999. George Smith, Dictionary of National Biography, Vols. 1-21 (: Oxford Press, 1885-1990).
  6. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came To America Bef ore 1700, 8th Edition (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 2004).
  7. The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists. Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Brian Tompsett, Dept. of Computer Science, Hull University online [http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cssbct/genealogy/royal/].
  8. Ernst-Friedrich Kraentzler, Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet and Cecily de Neville (Selp-published, 1978).
  9. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  10. Sir Bernard Burke, LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire; New Edition, 1866; London, Harrson, 59, Pall Mall; Bookseller to her Majesty and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales..
  11. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, online [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenriIIdied1189A].

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

 

Capt. George MEEK, Mark’s 6th great grandfather, was born in 1741 in Maryland to Robert and Elizabeth (Alexander) MEEK. He married Rachel HERRON (b. 1749; d. after 1810) daughter of David and Elizabeth HERRON, in 1770.

Marriage Record of George and Rachel Meek
Record of the marriage of Rachel Herron to George Meek in the Herron family genealogy recorded in the book “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical”; Vol. XVII; page 95.

George spent his formative years in Maryland. It is likely he moved to Centre County, Pennsylvania upon his marriage to Rachel.

George served with the 5th Pennsylvania Battalion under Capt. Thomas Alexander in the Revolutionary War between 1778 and 1781.

In an earlier article, I posted the full transcription of a Watchman Article of May 1, 1931 about George MEEK.

It is recorded that George took up a 1,000 acre tract of land on January 21, 1790, some of which remained with his family for generations. It is reported that the first surveys in Ferguson Township were made in 1766-1767, including tracts west of Pine Grove Mills and extending west to the Ross Farm, as well as tracts formerly belonging to General Patton. Another surveying party in 1784 camped at Stewart’s in Warrior’s Mark area on their way to Moshannon and Clearfield. On that trip, “George MEEK killed one large buck, pretty fat, not unwelcome news to the company.” In 1790, the George MEEK who killed the deer previously purchased a tract of land in Ferguson Township, Centre County.

Capt. George Meek died January 10,1802 and was buried after January 10, 1801 in the mountain gap west of Pine Grove Mills. At the time, this tract of land was used for lumbering. It is unknown whether his wife Rachel was also buried there. All trace of the grave has disappeared over the intervening years.

Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque

George Meek’s will written and dated November 3, 1801 in Ferguson Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania, was probated January 19, 1802, also in Ferguson Township.

Will Abstract of George Meek
Abstract of the Will of George Meek.

Transcription of the Abstract of George’s Will

Page 12, GEORGE MEEK, Ferguson Twp., 11/3/1801-1/19/1802, wife Rachel, friend Jonathan Wales, eldest son Robert, son William, David, John. Youngest Dr. Sarah not 21, Dtr. Mary Steelly, Dtr. Isabella, Dtr. Jean. Ex: Wife, & Thomas Ferguson. Witness: Thomas Ferguson, Joseph Diven, John Barron.

[Wills  of Centre County, Pennsylvania, by Ira F. Fravel, Col. U.S. Army, published 1/19/1939, re-copied December, 1967 by Mary Belle Lontz.]

The marriage of Capt. George MEEK and Rachel HERRON produced eight children and they were:

  1. Robert MEEK was born about 1765 and married sometime prior to 1801. His spouse is unknown.
  2. Mary MEEK (Mark’s 5th great grandmother) was born January 28, 1767, died January 25, 1850 in Fountain County, Indiana and was buried at Bend Cemetery, Fountain County. Sometime prior to 1830, she married Gabriel Stehle, son of Ulrich and Anna Stehle. Although George Meek’s will definitely records her as having been this Mary Meek, there was some debate that her last name was Stuart, perhaps resulting from a previous marriage, if indeed it is true.
  3. William Jerome MEEK was born in 1773 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania and died in 1806 in Huntingdon County. He was married prior to 1800 near McConnellstown, Huntingdon County to Elizabeth Breckenridge.
  4. David MEEK, born about 1774, married Polly Bailey. (Davie moved with his brother John to Clarion County, Pennsylvania, where their father owned some land.)
  5. John MEEK ; born 1775. John later moved to Clarion County, Pennsylvania with his brother David, and later moved down the Ohio River, settling somewhere in Ohio.
  6. Isabella MEEK was born in about 1779 and married Abel Benton.
  7. Jean MEEK’s birth place is unknown, but she did die in 1859.
  8. Sarah MEEK, born in about 1783, later married Capt. Thomas Holt.

Sources:

  1. Some Early Families of Centre County, Pennsylvania (Mainly from Half Moon, Patton, Ferguson and College Townships); Glenn (1988); Richard C. Glenn; 916-428-7238, Sacramento, CA 95823-7736, East Parkway; Assembled 1980-1988.
  2. There’s Power in the Blood: Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of Gray’s United Methodist Church, State College District, Nov 12, 1989; Gray’s United Methodist Church, Rte 550 S of Rte 322, R.D. Port Matilda, PA 16870.
  3. Linn’s History of Centre and Clinton Counties, Pennsylvania; Linn, John Blair; 1883..
  4. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brookefamily/herronjamessr.htm: accessed).
  5. Newtownship, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, Cumberland County, PA Will Book C pages 83 & 84 Will of David Herron of Newtownship Made 17 February 1778, ; Ancestry.com , http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14022930/person/1179236744/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid|pgNum.
  6. Meek, George – Wills of Centre County, Pennsylvania: ; Ancestry.com , http://ancestry.com.
  7. Meek George and Herron, Rachel and Marriage Record, “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical,” database.
  8. Notes and Queries – XVII; page 95, Ancestry.com (: Internet 14 November 2013), .
  9. Ancestry.com , U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications,1889-1970 (Name: Name:
  10. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:2011, Database online.
  11. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb a messr.htm: accessed ).
  12. Meek, Rachel;1810 US Census; Ferguson, Centre, Pennsylvania; Roll: 46; Page: 76; Image: 0193672; Family History Library Film: 00256, 00256; Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com)
  13. “Find A Grave Index,” database, Find A Grave, Find A Grave : Internet 4 September 2013), .
  14. “US, Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index, 1850-1880, “database, Ancestry.ca.
  15. Bend Cemetery, Covington, Fountain, Indiana, United States.

___________________

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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine.

 

Report on the Operation by 27th (City of Winnipeg) Battalion, on the morning of September 15th 1916.

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28

Reference Sheets COURCELETTE and LE MOUQUET 1/5,000.

__________________________________________________

Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 1
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg 1.

The Battalion left the BRICKFIELDS at 2.00p.m. on 14th Sept. and proceeded to Brigade Headquarters at X.ii.a.2.2. arriving there at 5.00p.m. Two platoons of D Coy. relieved the right Company of the 29th Battn. in front line by 6.30.p.m. The Battn. left Brigade H.Q. at 9.00p.m. and proceeded to the front line to take up position in Assembly Trenches. Owing to congestion of trenches this was not completed till 4.25a.m. The Battn. frontage extended from R.35.c.2.9 1/2 to R.35.c.6.5. Battn.H.Q. were located at R.35.c.4.3. At 6.20a.m. the artillery barrage opened, 50 yards in advance of German trench and the first wave commenced crawling over. As the barrage lifted the Battn. advanced on to the  first German Line and reached the trench, the Germans threw up their hands and surrendered. At least 70 dead Germans were counted in this trench This objective was reported to Battn.H.Q. as being taken at 6.27a.m. The Battn. followed up the barrage closely andmet very little opposition at SUNKEN ROAD, Germans surrendering in large numbers. By this time the first wave was nearly wiped out and the second wave took its place. A Company then swung to the left and captured its last objective with one Corpl. and 15 O.R. C and D Coys. reached their objectives and immediately commenced to dig in. This was reported to Battn. H.Q. at 7.40a.m. The line held ran from R.35.b.5. ? 1/2 on SUNKEN ROAD, through R.30.c.0.2. to R.30.c.5.2. Garrison holding this line consisted of 120 all ranks and 4 Lewis Guns located in advance posts at R.30.c.0.2 – 1.2. – 3.2. – 5.3. Owing to casualties the following reinforcements were sent up from B Coy.: – 1 platton to A Coy. on the left and 2 platoons to D Coy. on the right. 4 Officers only were left. Lieuts. McElligott, Holdsworth, Hamilton and Terndrup. Lieut Holdsworth showed great courage and devotion to duty until killed by an enemy sniper. Lieut. Hamilton n the left flank carried on under most trying conditions even after being buried by shells. He was eventually severely wounded on the afternoon of the 16th inst. Enemy attempted to advance up SUNKEN ROAD but were driven off by our Lewis Gun fire. A large number also advanced into a field South West of COURCELETTE and commenced sniping our frontage from this flank. Our Colt and Lewis Guns dealt with the satisfactorily. Two patrols of 1 Lewis gun and 30 men each from the 31st Battn. pushed on towards COURCELETTE but were forced to return to our line owing to the barrage fire. At 11.25p.m. 15th Sept. Lieut. McElligott took command of the whole of our frontage of 3 Coys. and showed great courage and ability in the organizing and consolidation work. The enemy artillery fire was very intense for 48 hours on our front line.
Colt Machine Guns.
Colt machine guns followed behind the third wave and took up positions as follows :-
No. 1 gun at R.30.c.5.1.
No. 2 gun at protecting gap at R.29.d.10.? 1.2.
No. 3 gun at R.35.b.6.7. This gun did excellent work on small parties of Huns who persisted in creeping up towards our new front line.
No. 4 gun was located on a knoll in rear of SUNKEN ROAD and covered our left frontage. When No. 2 gun had established themselves Sergt. F.W.Haines pointed out a German machine gun and crew with a number of snipers dug in in a shell hole 200 yards away. Pte. Stewart opened up with a belt knocking out a number of the party. Sgt.Haines, Corpl. Hancock and Pte.Stewart dashed forward under cover of our machine guns and captured a new model German Maxim. Germans to the number of 6 Officers and 16O.R. surrendered. Sergt.Haines, waving his revolver, motioned them to evacuate in pairs. They filed out and were marched to the  Field Ambulance party near by where they were used as stretcher bearers. The enemy hadthrown away the feed block of the captured gun but after considerable careful searching this was located in a shell hole. The gun was then mounted and turned on enemy snipers, causing considerable casualties.

2.

29

Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 2
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg. 2.

Communication. Our Signallers advanced behind the fourth wave and ran three separate lines to the final objective. These were joined up laterally in the front line, SUNKEN ROAD and the German front line. Communication, however, could not be kept as all the wires were broken by shell fire.
Battalion Scouts were utilized in the following manner :-
Two Scouts each to the following tasks :-
1. The taking of the German front line.
2. The taking of SUNKEN ROAD.
3. The taking of the left Coy.objective.
4. The taking and sonsolidation of the final objective by all Coys. All these Scouts reported successfully yo Battn.H.Q. on the completion of their observation.
Runners were employed continuously and although 75 per cent became casualties, a good number of messages were got through.
Visual Signalling was attempted with flags and flappers but this drew the enemy’s fire and could not be carried on.
Carrying Parties. During the first 24 hours, owing to the intense barrage it was only possible to get through very limited supplies. Coys. and Sections were instructed to collect water, ammunition, bombs and rations from the dead. Our stretcher bearers worked unceasingly carrying out the wounded. The following day, 16th Sept., 7 parties were organized and succeeded in getting through to the front line with tea, mulligan, rations, water, ammunition and bombs. These parties, under Lieut.Coombes and Reg.Sgt.-Mjr.Underwood also succeededin evacuating the wounded, burying the dead and cleared up the battle field. A salvage dump was established at SUNKEN ROAD. A good supply dump was also established in the old German front line. Great credit is due to Reg.S.M. Underwood for the success of this work.
The Battn. evacuated the trenches at 2.00a.m. 17th Sept. 1916 and proceeded to Brigade Reserve (5th Cdn.Inf.Bde.) at X.ii.a.2.2.
Our casualties amounted to Killed 5 officers,   67   O.R. –
Wounded 7  do. 243   do.
Missing     1  do.   71   do.
Total All Ranks 394.
At 8.00p.m. 17th Sept. 1916 the Battn. was relieved by the 1st Cdn.Battn. and proceeded to bivouacs at the BRICKFIELDS near ALBERT.
Prisoners captured by the Battalion amounted to 200.

[Signature of Officer Here]
Lieut. Col.
Commanding 27th (C.of W.)Battn.
6th Inf.Bde., 2nd Canadian Div.

19.9.16

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

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Get free access to Findmypast.com until 9 Mar 2015.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions, 29 July, 2014.

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