Tag: Wales

Sir William ap Thomas and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam

Sir William ap Thomas and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam

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Sir William ap Thomas Herbert, (21st great grandfather to my children) was born about 1390 to Sir Thomas ap Gwilyn (1360-1438) and Maud de Morley (1375-    ).

Featured image: Tomb with Effigies of Roger Vaughan and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam.

Sir William ap Thomas first married Elizabeth (or Isabel) Bluet (1380-1420), daughter of Sir John Bluet of Raglan Manor and Katherine Wogan, and widow of Sir James Berkeley. Elizabeth inherited Raglan Castle while married to to James Berkeley, who later died in about 1405. There were no children born to William and Elizabeth.

Sir William ap Thomas - Battle of Agincourt in 1415.
Sir William ap Thomas – Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

William fought in support of Henry V of England alongside Sir Roger Vaughan, first husband of his later wife Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam and her father Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn in the battle of Agincourt. Both Sir Roger and Dafydd Gam died in battle and Dafydd Gam was knighted as he lay dying. Sir William was made a knight-banneret.

In 1426, William was knighted by King Henry VI, and was known as “Y marchog glas o Went” (the blue knight of Gwent), because of the colour of his armour.

When Sir John Bloet died, Raglan Manor was inherited by Elizabeth and her husband James Berkeley. Upon Elizabeth’s death in 1420, William lived at Raglan as a tenant of his step-son James, Lord Berkeley. In 1425, James Berkely granted William the right to live at Raglan Manor for the remainder of his life.

In the earliest of his many occupations, William was made Steward of the Lordship of Abergavenny by 1421. At about this time, he married secondly the daughter of Dafydd Gam and the widow of Sir Roger Vaughan, Gwladys ferch Dafydd Gam, who was known as ‘Seren y fenni’ (Star of Abergavenny). The exact date of Gwladus’ birth is unknown, but she was born in Breconshire, Wales. She was renowned for her beauty, discretion and influence.

Her father supported Henry IV of England and as a result, she, her father, grandfather and two brothers were driven from their last home in Wales, finding refuge at King Henry IV’s court, where Gwladus served as a Maid of Honor to both of Henry IV’s wives, Mary de Bohun (about 1368-1394) and Joan (about 1370-1437).

After her marriage to Sir Roger Vaughan, she returned to Wales with her family as Roger was a great friend of her father’s and would later fight and die with him at Agincourt. Roger and Gwlady’s children were:

  • Watkin (Walter) Vaughan, who died 1456, married Elinor, daughter of Sir Henry Wogan, on Easter 1456. Watkin was murdered at home at Bredwardine Castle. His half-brother William Herbert and Walter Devereux worked to ensure the execution of the culprits at Hereford.
  • Thomas Vaughan, born about 1400, married Ellen Gethin, daughter of Cadwgan ap Dafydd. In 1461, Thomas died at the battle of Edgecote and was entombed at Kington church, near Hergest.
  • Sir Roger Vaughan of Tretower Court married first to Cicely, daughter of Thomas ap Philip Vychan, of Talgarth and second to Lady Margaret, daughter of Lord James Audley, another of the heroes of Agincourt. He died in 1471.
  • Elizabeth Vaughan married gentleman Griffith ap Eineon.
  • Blanch Vaughan married John Milwater, a wealthy Englishman commissioned by Edward IV to accompany Blanch’s half-brother, William Herbert, to the siege of Harlech Castle.

William ap Thomas and Gwladus had the following children:

  • Thomas Herbert, born in 1422.
  • Sir William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423–1469), who took the surname Herbert. William’s support for and loyalty to Richard, Duke of York, and Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, resulted in his being recognized as Edward IV’s Welsh “master-lock”. He was the first full-blooded Welshman to enter the English peerage and he was knighted in 1452. William married Anne Devereux in 1449. She was the daughter of Sir Walter Devereux.
  • Sir Richard Herbert, born about 1424, of Coldbrook House, near Abergavenny who died in the battle of Danesmoor.
  • Elizabeth, born about 1427, married Sir Henry Stradling (1423–1476), son of Sir Edward Stradling  and Gwenllian Berkerolles. In contrast to previous generation, Henry and his brothers-in-law were hostile to the Henry VI reign. In 1476, Henry went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land dying on August 31, 1476 on his journey back to England. He was buried at Famagusta, Cyprus.
  • Margaret, born about 1429, married Sir Henry Wogan, Steward and Treasurer of the Earldom of Pembroke. He was made responsible for securing war material for the defence of Pembroke Castle. Their son, Sir John Wogan, was killed in battle at Banbury in 1465, fighting along side his uncle, William Herbert.

Other children that have been attributed to Gwladus and William include: Maud, Olivia, Elizabeth (who married Welsh country gentlemen, John ab Gwilym).

Gwladus and William raised their own children as well as those from her marriage to Sir Roger Vaughan.

Abergavenny Priory, Abergavenny, Wales
Abergavenny Priory

By 1432 William was able to purchase Raglan Manor for about £667 and afterward, he expanded the manor to become Raglan Castle.

Sir William was appointed to the position of High Sheriff of Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire in 1435, and in 1440, also to the position of High Sheriff of Glamorgan. About 1442 or 1443, William became Chief Steward of the estates of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York. He also served as a member of the Duke of York’s military council.

William ap Thomas died in London in 1445 and his body was brought back to Wales. William’s wife, Gwladys, died in 1454. Gwladys and her husband William ap Thomas were patrons of Abergavenny Priory where they were both buried and their alabaster tomb and effigies can still be seen in the Priory.

Sources:

  1. The Herbert Family Pedigree, Ancient Wales Studies online; [http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id40.html].
  2. Herbert and Einion Sais links to Blayneys, online; [http://keithblayney.com/Blayney/Herbert_Einion.html#GAM].
  3. Thomas Allen Glenn, Merion in the Welsh Tract: With Sketches of the Townships of Haverford and Radnor (Norristown, PA: 1896), ; pdf, Digital Library; [http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Pennsylvaniana/Radnor%20Township/Radnor%20Friends/RadnorFriends-00004.xml].
  4. Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam; Find A Grave; [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=87468153].
  5. Early Leighs of Wales; [http://www.welshleigh.org/genealogy/prichardancestry/prichardhistorical4.htm].
  6. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  7. John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland (1834-1838).
  8. Dr. Thomas Nicholas, Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales (1875); [http://books.google.com/books?id=M34ystsNDn8C&pg=PA196&lpg=PA196&dq=cadwgan+ap+elystan+glodrydd&source=web&ots=I5BTVLyS8g&sig=wllXZyPfJjxL5e9oNePiwr6YX74&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result].
  9. John Edward Lloyd and R. T. Jenkins, Ed.; Dictionary of Welsh Biography down to 1940 (1957).
  10. Wikipedia; [http://www.wikipedia.org].

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Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky

Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky

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Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky is the grandson of the original immigrant from Wales, Evan (Dhu) Shelby (Selby), who is eighth great grandfather to my children, Erin and Stuart; the son of Brigadier General Evan Shelby, who is the son of Evan (Dhu) and seventh great granduncle to my children; and is therefore first cousin eight times removed from my children.

Although not a direct ancestor of my husband, Marshall Mark (Mark) Blythe or our children, Isaac Shelby is of great interest to us for a couple of reasons. First, he was renowned for and distinguished himself for his actions in battle against United Empire Loyalists in Canada in the War of 1812, ultimately defeating Loyalist forces at the Battle of the Thames in southern Ontario. We are also related to and are descended from Loyalists who settled in this area. For a lengthy period of time, we lived in Trenton, Ontario which is located in the area of Loyalist activities and battles against American forces. This area is steeped in this history and it is still considered to be an honor to be from a Loyalist lineage.

Marshall Matthews Blythe
Marshall Matthews Blythe
Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.
Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

Second, because Isaac Shelby is so revered in history, there are accurate portraits of him during the latter period of his life available. Upon comparing portraits of him with recent pictures of my father-in-law, Marshall Matthews Blythe (father to my husband Mark and grand-father to my children Erin and Stuart), the resemblance between them is quite remarkable. For clarification, Isaac is first cousin six times removed to my father-in-law.

Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750 – July 18, 1826) was a revered and decorated soldier and the first Governor of Kentucky.

The son of Brigadier General Evan and Letitia (Cox) Shelby, Isaac was born December 11, 1750 near North Mountain, Frederick (now Washington) County, Maryland.

Having been raised with the use of arms, he became proficient at an early age and was very familiar with and accustomed to the hardships and stresses of frontier life. Isaac worked on his father’s plantation. However, having received an education, he was occasionally employed as a surveyor and also as Deputy Sheriff.

About 1773, the Shelby family moved to the Holston region of Southwest Virginia, now East Tennessee, where they established a new home. A timeline of Isaac Shelby’s military and political career thereafter is as follows:

1774

  • Isaac Shelby served at the Battle of Point Pleasant as a Lieutenant under his father, Brigadier General Evan Shelby, in the Fincastle Company on October 10.
  • Second in command of the garrison of Fort Blair (until July 1775), which was built on the site of the battle. An uprising of the Shawnee and Delaware Indians compelled Isaac to take up arms and he served as a Lieutenant under his father Brigadier Evan Shelby in the Battle of Point Pleasant in West Virginia.
  • He fought in the Battle of Kenhawa of 10 October. This was believed to be the most severely contested campaign ever fought with the north-western Indians.

1775

  • After July of 1775, he visited Kentucky and surveyed lands for the Transylvania Company.
  • After returning to Kentucky due to failing health, he became involved in the Battle of Long Island Flats.
  • At the first onset of the Indians, the American lines were broken and Shelby, who was there only as a volunteer Private, seized command, reformed the troops, and severely defeated the Indians.

1776

  • In July he was appointed by the Virginia Committee of Safety to the position of Captain of a company of minute men. However, he was not called into service.

1777

  • Governor Patrick Henry promoted Shelby to Captain and made him Commissary-General of the Virginia forces.
  • He attended the Long Island Treaty with the Cherokees, which was finalized at Fort Patrick Henry on July 20, 1777, at which his father was one of the Virginia commissioners.

1778

  • Helped to provide supplies for the Continental Army and for the expedition projected by General McIntosh against Detroit and the Ohio Indians.

1779

  • Provided boats for Clark’s Illinois campaign and collected and provided supplies upon his own personal credit for the successful campaign waged about the same time against the Chickamauga Indians.
  • In the spring he was elected as a member for Washington County of the Virginia legislature.
  • In the fall, Governor Thomas Jefferson made him a Major in the escort of guards for the commissioners appointed to run the western boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina. By the extension of that line, his residence was found to be within the limits of North Carolina.
  • He resigned his commission, but was at once appointed Colonel of Sullivan County by Governor Caswell.

1780

  • Upon receiving news of the fall of Charleston on May 12th, he returned home to an urgent summons for help from Colonel Charles McDowell.
  • He organized a force and about July 25, he joined McDowell at the Cherokee Ford, South Carolina.
  • On July 30, Shelby captured the major Loyalist stronghold, Thicketty Fort (Fort Anderson), at the head of the Pacolet River. On August 8, his command successfully repulsed a party sent by Major Ferguson at the second Battle of Cedar Springs.
  • Upon receipt of the report of General Gates’ defeat at Camden on August 16, operations under McDowell and Shelby were halted.
  • On August 18, he was largely responsible for the victory at Battle of Musgrove’s Mill on the north side of the Enoree River.
  • As a result of a threatening message dispatched by Ferguson, Shelby held even greater resentment and determination and in consequence, with the assistance of John Sevier and others, he organized and conducted the expedition against Ferguson.
  • On October 7, they overwhelmingly defeated Ferguson’s combined Provincial and Loyalist force in the Battle of King’s Mountain.

1781

  • Shelby has also been credited with the plan for the attack, which led to the Battle of the Cowpens on January 17.
  • In February, the legislature of North Carolina adopted resolutions of thanks to Shelby and his compatriots for their services at King’s Mountain.
  • Similar resolutions were adopted by the Continental Congress on November 13.
  • As a result of repeated uprisings by Cherokee Indians during the first half of the year, it was impractical to send forces from there to assist.
  • A treaty with the Cherokees was negotiated on July 20.
  • In October, upon receipt of a delayed message of appeal, Shelby raised 500 mounted riflemen and was accompanied by Colonel John Sevier in command of 200 more.
  • He marched to join Greene, by whose order they reported to General Marion on the Santee.
  • The joint command of Shelby and Colonel Hezekiah Maham, of the Carolina dragoons, contributed greatly to the capture of a strong British post at Fair Lawn, near Monck’s Corner, South Carolina on November 27.
  • Meanwhile, having been elected a member of the North Carolina legislature and having obtained a leave of absence, he attended the sessions in December.

1782

  • Reelected to the North Carolina Assembly, he attended the legislative sessions held at Hillsboro in April.
  • He was appointed one of three commissioners to superintend the laying off of the land south of the Cumberland River allotted by North Carolina for military service in the Revolution.

1783

  • Completed the laying off of the land south of the Cumberland River.
  • He relocated to Kentucky, where he was married to Susannah Hart, daughter of Captain Nathaniel Hart, at Boonesborough on April 19, by whom he had eleven children.
  • Appointed a Trustee of Transylvania Seminary (later Transylvania University).
  • Chairman of the convention of militia officers held at Danville on Nov. 7-8 (was also a member 1787-1789).

1787

  • In January 1791, he was appointed a member of the Board of War, which was created by Congress for the District of Kentucky, and was charged with providing for the defense of the frontier settlements mounting punitive expeditions against the Indians.
  • For several years he served as High Sheriff of Lincoln County.

1792

  • Member of the convention (April 2-19) which framed the first constitution of Kentucky.
  • In May he was elected Governor, taking office on June 4 and serving four years.
  • During his administration many events of importance to the infant commonwealth occurred, not the least being the part it took, under Shelby, in supporting Wayne’s campaigns against the Indians in the Northwest Territory.

1796

  • At the close of his term, he declined reelection.

1796-1812

  • Retired from service.

1812

  • Elected Governor of Kentucky a second time in August.
  • He actively participated in the planning and preparation for war.

1813

  • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada, resulting in the defeat of the Loyalists on October 5 at the Battle of the Thames.

1817

  • He was given the portfolio of War in March by President Monroe, but declined due to his age.

1818

  • Isaac Shelby was awarded a gold medal by Congress on April 4 in recognition of his patriotic and heroic services.
  • Shelby and General Andrew Jackson were commissioned to hold a treaty with the Chickasaw Indians for the purchase of their lands west of the Tennessee River.
  • He was President of the first Kentucky Agricultural Society, formed at Lexington in 1818.

1819

  • He was Chairman of the first Board of Trustees of Center College, founded in 1819 at Danville, Kentucky.
Governor Isaac Shelby - Traveler's Rest Burying Ground Plaque
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky – Traveler’s Rest Burying Ground Plaque.

1826

  • After his death on July 18, he was buried at his historic home, “Traveller’s Rest,” and a monument was erected over his grave by the state of Kentucky. Counties in nine states have been named Shelby in his honor. __________ An account of Governor Isaac Shelby by Samuel M. Wilson is as follows:

 

Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky - Grave Marker.
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky – Grave Marker.

“In person, Shelby was of a sturdy and well-proportioned frame, slightly above medium height, with strongly marked features and florid complexion. He had a hardy constitution capable of enduring protracted labor, great privations, and the utmost fatigue. Habitually dignified and impressive in bearing, he was, however, affable and winning. A soldier born to command, he nevertheless evidenced a high degree of political sagacity and executive ability. Numerous difficulties confronted him during his first administration, when the new government was passing through its formative stage, and much depended on the choice of officials then made by the executive. Shelby exhibited rare selective intelligence and an extraordinary mastery both of men and measures. Kentucky at this time experienced constant dread of the occlusion by Spain of the Mississippi River, and use was made of this situation by designing men to promote speculative ventures and political schemes hostile to the true interests of both Kentucky and the Union. Through it all, Shelby pursued a wise and moderate course which baffled the plots of all conspirators and held Kentucky firmly to her federal moorings. During his second administration, the pressure of the war with Great Britain fell with extraordinary and unremitting severity upon the state, and he showed himself not only a prudent and farseeing counselor, but an active, resourceful, and patriotic leader. His energy, determination, and perseverance knew no bounds, and his devotion to duty was unflagging.”

You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site are available for free access and download.

Sources:

  1. Shelby, John Todd: KERR, C. ed. History of Kentucky, v. 3-5, 1922 #4.
  2. History of Michigan; Moore, C.; v. 2-4; 1915; Shelby, William Read.
  3. Family Data Collection – Births; Shelby, Alfred, 1765.
  4. Family Data Collection – Individual Records; Shelby, Nancy, 1792.
  5. 1860 US Census; Shelby, John Warren, b. 1835; PO Lexington; Roll M653_365; Pg 0.
  6. Shelby, Isaac Flournoy: KERR, C. ed. History of Kentucky, v. 3-5, 1922.
  7. The Pioneer Mothers of America 1; Shelby, Susannah Hart; Green, H.C. and M.W.; 3 v., 1912.
  8. American Biographical and Historical Dictionary; Shelby, Isaac; Allen (W); 1832.
  9. Military Heroes of the War of 1812; Shelby, Evan; Peterson, C.J.; 1848.
  10. Eminent Americans; Shelby, Isaac; Lossing, B.J.; 1857.
  11. National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans; Shelby, Isaac; 4v.; 1865.
  12. Dictionary of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; Drake, F.S.; 1870.
  13. Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the US…; Shelby, Isaac; Lanman, C.; 1876.
  14. Biographical Encyclopaedia of Kentucky; Shelby, Isaac; 1878.
  15. National Cyclopaedia of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; v.1-13; 1898, 1893-1909.
  16. Harper’s Encyclopaedia of American History; Shelby, Isaac; 10v.; 1902.
  17. Century Cyclopedia of Names; Shelby, Isaac; 1904.
  18. Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; Herringshaw, T.W.; 5v.; 1909-14.
  19. Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army…; Shelby, Isaac; 1775, to… 1783; new, rev. & enl. ed. 1914.
  20. History of Kentucky; Shelby, Isaac; Kerr, C. ed.; v.3-5; 1922.
  21. An American Biographical and Historical Dictionaryy; Shelby, Isaac; Allen, W.; 2nd ed.; 1832.
  22. US Army Historical Register; Shelby, Isaac; 1789-1903; Vol. 1.
  23. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography; Shelby, Evan; 6 vol.; 1888.
  24. 1820 US Census; Shelby, Isaac; 1750; Roll No. M33_25; Pg 59; Image No. 38.
  25. Passenger and Immigration Lists, 1500s-1900s; Shelby, Isaac.
  26. Settlers of Maryland 1679 – 1783; Consolidated Edition; Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.; 2002; Pg 597.
  27. Kentucky Land Grants, Shelby, Isaac; Jillson, Willard Rouse; The Kentucky Land Grants, Vol. I-II, Louisville, KY: Filson Club Publications, 1925.
  28. US and International Marriage Record; Shelby, Isaac b 1750; 1560-1900.
  29. Shelby, Isaac; KY Historical Society: http://kentucky.gov/kyhs/hmdb/MarkerSearch.aspx?mode=Subject&subject=185. KW-N-399-3.
  30. Dictionary of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac.
  31. DAR; Mrs. Maria Shelby Tevis Field; DAR ID Number 7785; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Vol. 8; Pg 265.
  32. DAR; Anna Stein Shelby (Annie Shelby Darbishire); National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 11; Pg 182.
  33. DAR; Mrs. Alice McDowell Shelby Riddle; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 16130; Vol. 17, Pg 51.
  34. DAR; Mrs. Katherine Shelby Scott; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 18004; Vol. 19; Pg 3.
  35. DAR; Miss Katharine Shelby Todd; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 25234; Vol. 26; Pg 83.
  36. DAR; Mrs. Laura Shelby Fisher; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 42; Pg 154.
  37. DAR; Mrs. Mary P. Shelby Napton; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 62264; Vol. 63, Pg 87.
  38. DAR; Miss Christine Shelby; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 68811; Vol. 69; Pg 291.
  39. DAR; Miss Shelby Walker Patton; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 83679; Vol. 84; Pg 263.
  40. DAR; Miss Susan Shelby Taylor; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 85134; Vol. 86; Pg 51.
  41. DAR; Mrs. Ann Shelby Magoffin Austin; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 114; Pg 141.
  42. “Soldiers of the American Revolution from Franklin County,”  database, Ancestry.com http://search.ancestry.com; extracted from  (N.p.:n.p.n.d.).Revolutionary Soldiers in Kentucky p. 174.74.
  43. Shelby Historical Data (Chronology for Evan Shelby, Jr. and Letitia Cox), online http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.trolinger.com, accessed.


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Genealogy Database

Genealogy Database

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Athelwulf, King of Wessex
Athelwulf, King of Wessex

Our Blythe Genealogy Database

After extensive work, my genealogy database is now updated and links can be found in the upper menu or in the left sidebar. There are thousands of surnames and the extensive lineages include Welsh Quaker immigrants to the USA, French Canadian, Acadian, American pioneers, Canadian pioneers, French, British, Welsh, German, Scandinavian and medieval and royal genealogies.

The database includes extensive facts, sources and some images.


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The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

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The UK National Archives  has a free online search, but there are problems. Some knowledge has always been necessary to search the catalogue with any success.

The Discovery Service makes it easier for everyone – novice to expert – to search and use the collection.

The user is able to search the collection, explore and browse, whether for genealogy research and/or scholastic purposes.

Discovery is a digitized document delivery service that will make it easier to search for genealogy records such as wills and testaments, court proceeding transcription and order digitized genealogy records.

To experience Discovery, visit the Labs section of the National Archives website, the place they release new online services for customers for testing and to provide feedback. New features are being added to Discovery regularly and the latest release includes advanced search and fixes existing problems in previous versions.

The Discovery service will be fully tested and approved before it replaces any other services.

The National Archives holds over 22 million historical government and public records, doubling in just over two years and making it one of the largest archive collections in the world. From Domesday Book to modern government papers and digital files, the collection includes paper and parchment, electronic records and websites, photographs, posters, maps, drawings and paintings.

The old catalogue offered a free search of the collection, but had its problems. A minimum knowledge level was necessary to be able to effectively search the collection. This required level of knowledge made it difficult for new users to take advantage of the search.

The National Archives Discovery Service implemented a system that makes it easier for users of all levels.


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Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

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NOTE: In the biography of William Read Shelby as well as some biographies of earlier Shelbys, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

Biography of William Read Shelby
Biography of William Read Shelby

____________
1842-1930 (handwritten)

SHELBY, William Read, railroad president was born in Lincoln county, Ky., Dec. 4, 1842, eldest son of John Warren and Mary H. (Knight) Shelby, and a descendant of Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1740, and settled near Hagerstown, Md. Evan, son of Evan Shelby, was appointed brigadier-general by the state of Virginia, in 1779, for services rendered in Indian warfare. His son, Isaac Shelby, was the first governor of Kentucky. William Read Shelby acquired his eduation in the preparatory schools and at Centre College, Danville, Ky., his studies being cut short by the civil war, and subsequent occupation of Kentucky by the Federal and Confederate troops. As a member of the “Kentucky Home Guard,” he enrolled and recruited men for the Federal army. In 1863-5 he supplied wood to steamers on the Mississippi river at Isalnd No. 37, being protected by U. S. gunboats. From then until 1869, he was employed by the Adams Express Co., at Louisville, Ky., removing to Pittsburg to become secretary of the Continental Improvement Co. Among its first undertaking was the contract to build the Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad in Michigan and Indiana. Mr. Shelby took charge of a branch office at Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1871, having in the year previous been elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana and the Michigan & Lake Shore railroad companies. On Jan. 1, 1892, he was made first vice-president of the former company, retaining the positions of treasurer and purchasing agent. In June, 1896, the Grand Rapids & Indiana

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William Read Shelby bio
Biography of William Read Shelby

Railroad Co. was sold out under foreclosure proceedings ; a  new company, with the same name, was organized, and Mr. Shelby elected vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent. In 1870-73 he held also the office of secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Co. On Oct. 16, 1899, he was elected president of the Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Co. and president of the Big Rapids & Western Railroad Co., and on Oct. 14, 1899, he was elected president of the Cincinnati, Richmone & Fort Wayne Railroad Co. Mr. Shelby has been extensively interested in the development of farming interests in various sections of the country. He is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank, later known as the ” Old National Bank, ” of Grand Rapids, and a stockholder in various manufacturing and mercantile concerns ; a member of the board of education, and chairman of its committee on grounds ; in 1888-93 he was a member and part of the time president of the board of public works. Mr. Shelby is a Democrat, and it was on his motion in the sound money conference in Chacago that the “Indianapolis convention” was held in 1896, causing the defeat of the Chicago platform and Bryan. He was chairman of the sound money Democratic organization in Michigan, which conducted so vigorous a campaign against “Free Silver and 16 to 1.” Mr. Shelby was married, June 16, 1869, at Sewickley, Pa., to Mary C., daughter of Gen. George W. Cass, the issue being five sons and two daughters.

The National cyclopaedia of
American biography.  v.1-13.
1898.  1893-1909.

041

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link in the upper right corner just below the search box and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

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inbreedingThere will always be debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy.

I am so lucky that we have such a wide range of ancestries and national origins in my husband’s and my family trees. Those who have read my posts before are already well aware that our ancestries branch off from four (or five) distinct groups, and marriage between these groups is rare.

The groups containing our ancestries are:

MY ANCESTRY

  • Acadians

French Huguenots escaping religious persecution in France in the mid to late 17th century relocated to the Atlantic coast of Canada and the United States, giving birth to the Acadian and Cajun cultures.

  • French Canadians

You would think, since the origins of French Canadians are essentially the same as the Acadians, there would be more intermarriage between the two, but I have found very few connections between the two groups in our family tree – at least so far. Most French Canadians descended from French explorers and pioneers involved in the fur trade and colonizing what is now part of Ontario and Quebec, although Acadians did find their way up the St. Lawrence River after the great expulsion (grand dérangement) of the French settlers by the British colonists.

MARK’S ANCESTRY

  • Scandinavian

Although the majority of the ancestry of my husband on his mother’s side is Swedish, the other Scandinavian nations and cultures are represented as well.

  • Welsh Quaker

Mark’s ancestry on his father’s side originates from Welsh immigrants who were also escaping religious persecution for their puritan beliefs at the hands of the Welsh and British nobility and clergy.

  • British Royalty and Nobility

The interesting point to make here is that Mark’s connections to British royalty and nobility occur through his Welsh Quaker ancestry.

I decided to touch on this subject after reading the post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter entitled, “Man Traces Ancestry to 1st English King – So What?.”

Mathematically, Dick Eastman’s calculations of the numbers of ancestors and/or descendants in a family based upon an average number and length of generations, as well as an average number of children in families appear to make sense. However, there are so many variables affecting the numbers, that it is almost impossible to make accurate estimations, much less calculations.

These variables include:

  1. Individuals who remained single and bore no children.
  2. Individuals who died young and were never married, much less had children.
  3. Mass deaths due to war, disease and poverty wiping out most or all of a generation or two.
  4. Variations in sizes of families as influenced by tradition or custom, health and fertility, relationships, economics, etc.

One major point made by Dick is his belief that everyone can eventually trace their ancestries back to royalty, but by my experience, this appears to be flawed.

As illustrated in the diverse groups outlined above in our ancestries, we originate from several unique national, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Examining our family tree makes it apparent that intermarriage between these groups was almost impossible due to geography, economics, politics and custom. Most people, no matter where they were from or how wealthy and socially prominent they were, usually married within their own group.

The interesting point illustrated by our ancestry is that although my husband’s and my ancestries are quite separate and rarely intermarried, the fact that he and I married and had our two children now combines our ancestries for all future generations. Therefore, it’s easy to assume that intermarriage occurred (and will occur) much more as the world became smaller through technology, multi-culturalism, etc., which are more modern phenomena of the last hundred years or so.

In previous posts, I touched on this subject as it relates to our ancestry and evolving cultural methods of managing relationships and marriages to ensure as little inbreeding as possible. These posts are “The Science of Husbandry on a Human Scale” and “Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

I must thank Dick Eastman as his is one of the few blogs I do read that routinely challenge my thinking and assumptions. I like that.

photo credit: wonker via photopin cc


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Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr. of Tregaron, Wales

Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr. of Tregaron, Wales

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Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr. of Tregaron, Wales.

Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr., born in 1725 in Tregaron, Ceredigion, Wales to Evan (Dhu) Shelby (Selby) and his wife Catherine Morgan and was baptised in St. Caron’s church. This Evan Shelby’s birth is frequently confused with that of his earlier brother Evan, who was born in 1720 and died as an infant in 1721.

Tregaron, CeredigionEvan and his family immigrated to America from Tregaron, Wales in approximately 1735, when he was about ten years of age, and settled in what was later called Antrim Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania.

In 1739, they moved into Prince George’s (later Frederick) County, Maryland where his father died in July 1751.

Evan Jr. continued to reside in Maryland, near the North Mountain, Frederick County (now a part of Washington County) where he obtained by either deed or patent nearly 24,000 acres of land. He became interested in the Indian fur trade and was concerned in trading posts at Michilimackinac and Green Bay.

On February 26, 1745, Evan Jr. purchased property from his father, called “Maiden’s Choice” in Prince George County, Maryland.

Evan married Letitia (Leddy) Cox (Coxe) on December 4, 1745 at Kings Meadow. They had seven children: Rachel, born 1745; Susannah, born 1746; John, born 1748; Governor Isaac Shelby, born 1750; James, born 1752; Catherine, born 1755; Major Evan Shelby III, born 1757; and Moses, born 1761.

In his publication “The Birthplace and Childhood Home of Isaac Shelby in Washington County, Maryland”, 1972, Gerald J Sword describes how  Evan and Letitia Shelby lost the fight for their land (part of “Maidens Choice”) to Dr Charles Carroll. It’s not clear who aptly renamed the land to “Shelby’s Misfortune”.

Mr. Sword states:

“…The reason for Letitia to appear in court was to answer charges that she instructed their ‘Dutch servant man’ to cut down and burn the tree marking the beginning point of this land.

In June 1754, Shelby gave a recognizance of 6,000 lbs of tobacco for the appearance of his wife to answer the charges against her in the Frederick Co. Court. The case was continued from time to time until the June court of 1758:

“A suit on behalf of the Lord Proprietary vs Letitia Shelby for destroying a bound tree for a tract of land belonging to Dr Carroll, when it was ‘maked struck off after 15 continuances…”

Evan’s great skill as a hunter and woodsman led to his appointment as Captain of a company of Rangers in the French and Indian War, during which year he made several successful expeditions into the Allegheny Mountains.

He fought many battles in what is called Braddock’s War and was noted for his performance in the battle fought at Loyal Hanning, now Bedford, Pennsylvania.

During the French and Indian War, Evan participated in General Edward Braddock’s campaign in 1755 and laid out part of the road from Fort Frederick to Fort Cumberland. He led the advance of the army under General Forbes, which took possession of Fort Du Quesne in 1758.

Having served as First Lieutenant in Captain Alexander Beall’s company 1757 to 1768, he was commissioned by Governor Sharpe of Maryland as Captain of a company of rangers, and also held a commission as Captain under the government of Pennsylvania. He was in the advance party of the force under General John Forbes, which took possession of Fort Duquesne in 1758, and crossed the Ohio River with more than half his company of scouts, making a daring reconnaissance of the fort.

On November 12, 1758, near Loyalhanna, he is said to have slain with his own hand one of the principal Indian chiefs.

In the same war, he served later as Major of a detachment of the Virginia regiment.

For several years after the conflict, Evan was a Justice of the Peace.

In May 1762, he was chosen one of the Managers for Maryland of the Potomac Company. He sustained heavy losses in the Indian trade from the ravages growing out of Pontiac’s Conspiracy of 1763, and most of his property in Maryland was subjected to sale for the satisfaction of his debts.

Hoping to better his fortune he moved, probably in 1773, to Fincastle County in southwest Virginia, where he engaged in farming, merchandising, and cattle ranching. He again became a prosperous landowner and influential frontier leader.

In 1774, he commanded the Fincastle Company in Dunmore’s War, and in the battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774, he succeeded near the close of the action to the chief command as a result of the death or disability of his superior officers and he utterly routed the enemy.

His son, Isaac, served under his command as his Lieutenant in the Battle of Point Pleasant, which he was instrumental in winning. Isaac commanded the fort there until July, 1775, when his troops were disbanded by Lord Dunmore.

After returning to Kentucky due to failing health, he became involved in the Battle of Long Island Flats. At the first onset of the Indians, the American lines were broken, and then Shelby, present only as a volunteer Private, seized the command, reformed the troops, and defeated the Indians, with the loss of only two badly wounded men.

This battle, and John Sevier’s defence of Watauga, frustrated the rear attack by which the British hoped to envelop and crush the southern colonies.

In 1776, he was appointed by Governor Patrick Henry of Virginia a Major in the troops commanded by Colonel William Christian against the Cherokees, and on December 21, he became Colonel of the militia of the County of Washington, of which he was also a magistrate.

In 1777, he was entrusted with the command of sundry garrisons posted on the frontier of Virginia, and in association with Preston and Christian, negotiated a treaty with the Cherokees.

When Sevier, in 1779, projected the expedition that captured the British stores at Chickamauga, Shelby equipped and supplied the troops by the pledge of his individual credit. In this year he was commissioned a Major by Governor Thomas Jefferson, but, when the state line was run, his residence was found to be in North Carolina. He then resigned his commission, but was at once appointed Colonel of Sullivan County by Caswell.

He was in Kentucky, perfecting his title to lands he had selected on his previous visit, when he heard of the fall of Charleston and the desperate situation of affairs in the southern colonies. He at once returned to engage in active service and, crossing the mountains into South Carolina in July, 1780, he won victories over the British at Thicketty Fort, Cedar Springs, and Musgrove’s Mill. But, as the disastrous defeat at Camden occurred just before the last engagement, he was obliged to retreat across the Alleghanies. There he undertook with John Sevier the remarkable expedition which resulted in the Battle of King’s Mountain and turned the tide of the revolution. For this important service he and Sevier received the thanks of the North Carolina legislature, and the vote of a sword and a pair of pistols.

As a result of the new boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina, it was discovered that his residence was in North Carolina, and in 1781, he was elected a member of its Senate. Five years later, the Carolina Assembly made him Brigadier General of the militia of the Washington District of North Carolina, the first officer of that grade on the “Western Waters”.

In March 1787, as commissioner for North Carolina, he negotiated a temporary truce with Col. John Sevier, Governor of the insurgent and short-lived “State of Franklin”.

In August 1787, he was elected Governor of the “State of Franklin” to succeed Sevier but declined. Having resigned his post as Brigadier General on October 29,1787, he withdrew from public life.

Read More Read More


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Cadwallon ap Cadfan, King of Gwynedd.

Cadwallon ap Cadfan, King of Gwynedd.

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My children’s 40th great grandfather, Cadwallon ap Cadfan (also Cadwalader, Cadwallon, Caedwalla, Caswallon, Caedwalla, or Catgublaun), King of Gwynedd (presently north Wales), was born about 600 in Gwynedd, and is just one of their many Welsh Quaker ancestors.

 

Cadwallon ap Cadfan's Kingdom of Gwynedd

He was the son of Cadfan (Cadvan) ap Iago, King of Gwynedd (570-625) and Afandreg “Ddu, the Black” ferch Cynan Garwyn (580- ). Cadwallon ap Cadfan was the namesake ancestor for the Cadwallader lineage which continued down through Evan (Dhu) Isaac Shelby, ninth great grandfather of Erin and Stu. and the original Cadwallader descendant who immigrated to Pennsylvania, USA to escape religious persecution.

In 614, Cadwallon ap Cadfan married Alcfrith of Mercia (600-   ), who was only about 14 years of age and the sister of King Penda. Their only child, a son, was St. Cadwaladr (Fendigard, The Blessed) ap Cadwallon, King of Gwynedd, who was born about 630 and died at 52 years of age in 682.

King Eadwine of Northumbria
King Eadwine of Northumbria

It is speculated that Eadwine (later to be King of Northumbria) may have attended with Cadwallon, where animosity grew between them, laying the foundation for hostilities in later years that turned to war. Meanwhile, a deadly rivalry had long existed between Gwynedd and Northumbria. Aethelfrith, the (Fierce, Destroyer), had soundly defeated the Britons in battle at Chester in 613 and after Eadwine left the royal Gwynedd court, he was able to succeed Aethelfrith to a united Northumbrian crown with the intervention of King Redwald of East Anglia in 616.

About 625, Cadwallon ap Cadfan succeeded his father as King of Gwynedd.

Cadwallon ap Cadfan's father's gravestone at Llangadwaladr Church, Anglesey.
Cadwallon ap Cadfan’s father’s gravestone at Llangadwaladr Church, Anglesey.

Afterward, Eadwine began to work toward expanding his kingdom, conquered the kingdom of Elmet (now Yorkshire). and then after Cadfan’s death, went after Gwynedd, Ynys Manaw (Isle of Man) and Ynys Mon (Anglesey). Having experienced several defeats at Ynys Mon, Cadwallon ap Cadfan was forced back to Ynys Lannog (Priestholm) in about 629, where he was further attacked for weeks before he escape to Ireland. After his escape to and brief stay in Ireland, Cadwallon formed an alliance with Penda, King of the Mercians in about 632 and they invaded Deira to defeat Eadwine’s army and killed Eadwine and his son Osfrid in the battle of Heathfield (Hatfield Chase) on October 12, 633.

Despite Cadwallon ap Cadfan being a christian and Penda being a notorious and merciless pagan. Cadwallon’s own viciousness was indeed worse than Penda’s. It is said he worked toward his ambition to eliminate the Anglians from Britain with no limits on his actions, not hesitating to subject women and children to torture and ultimately death. This is, however, believed to be an exaggeration of what actually occurred.

Eadwine had been converted to Christianity by Paulinus, who later retired to Kent. In his retirement, Paulinus was accompanied by the Queen, her daughter, son and grandson, Osric (Eadwine’s cousin) and Eaufrith (Aethelfrith’s son). They renounced their christianity with the hope of recovering the kingdom of Deira and Bernicia, and to win favour with the Mercians. Their efforts were short-lived though, as they were defeated and killed by Cadwallon within the next year.

Saint Oswald of Bernicia
Saint Oswald of Bernicia (Northumbria)

Having proved his prowess as an oppressor, Cadwallon ap Cadfan claimed that his forces were invincible. He was proved wrong, however, when Eaufrith’s young brother and Eadwine’s cousin, Oswald, promised to defeat him. Very soon within the same year, he rallied his army and proceeded to Heavenfield (Hevenfeith), which was situated on a hill north of the Roman wall near Hexham. Here he helped his army erect a cross and they knelt and prayed “to the living and true God, who knew how just their cause was, to save them from their fierce and haughty foe.” With a new-found resolve, they attacked and defeated Cadwallon’s force, driving Cadwallon ap Cadfan into the valley where he was killed in 634 at “the Deniseburn”. Speculation is that this was a creek that flowed to the Tyne.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

photo credits: Wikipedia.org

Sources:

  1. Early British Kingdoms; David Nash Ford.
  2. Dictionary of Welsh Biography; Sir John Edward Lloyd, D.Litt., F.B.A., F.S.A. (1861-1947), Bangor.
  3. Wikipedia;  Cadwallon ap Cadfan.
  4. Ancient and Medieval Wales and the Cadwal(l)ader and Quaker Traditions; Anna Baker.
  5. Llywelyn ap Iorwerth Ancestor Table, Rootsweb.com online (http://www.rootsweb.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm).
  6. Dictionary of National Biography; George Smith, Vols. 1-21 (Oxford Press, 1885-1990).
  7. Ancestry of Cynan Tyndaethwy; Ancient Wales Studies.
  8. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.

 


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

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The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Feature image: Map of the kingdom of Prussia in the 18th century.

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Argentina

Australia

Canada

Chile

Croatia

Czechoslovakia

Denmark

Honduras

Hungary

Netherlands

Philippines

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Australia

Germany

Guam

Mexico

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

 


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David Coon: A Civil War story… and tragedy.

David Coon: A Civil War story… and tragedy.

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I spent a great deal of time transcribing the typewritten copies of handwritten letters of David Coon to his wife and children from Confederate prison, marking the days until his subsequent death from disease. The original transcriptions were completed by his son, Dr. William B. Coon in 1913, one for each family member. My father-in-law now holds one of the transcribed sets of letters.

 

David Coon and Mary Ann Adams
David and Mary Ann (Adams) Coon

David Coon, born February 10, 1824 in Beekmantown, Clinton County, New York, was the son of William B. Coon and Clarissa Haskel Williams. David Coon was the 4th great grandfather of my children on their father’s side by adoption.

My husband’s father-in-law, Marshall Matthews Blythe was the son of Louise Matthews, who was adopted by Dennis William Matthews, son of Elam Dennis Matthews and grandson of David Coon.

On June 15, 1843, David married his first wife, Mary Ann Adams, daughter of Alanson Adams and Submit Hall, in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont. In subsequent years, they had seven children: Alonzo Beckwith Coon, Edgar Coon, Herbert William Coon, Emma E. Coon, Hiram Southwick Coon, Elam Dennis Coon and Orilla (Mary) Coon. Mary Ann died June 3, 1859.

Between 1843 and June of 1844, he was living in Licking County, Ohio and in 1844, started a wagon making business with his brother-in-law Elam Dennis Adams. He is shown in records of November 27, 1854 in Waushara County, Wisconsin, living on 40 acres of military bounty land at the SE Quarter of NW Quarter of Section 12, Township 19. He is recorded in the 1860 census for Bloomfield, Waushara County, Wisconsin, farming his land.

David married his second wife, Isabel Ann Hall, daughter of Benjamin Hall and Eliza McReynolds on November 24, 1859 in Leon, Waushara County, Wisconsin. They added to the family with three more children: John Williams Coon, Matthew Edgar Coon and Jedidah Wood Coon. Isabel Ann was the cousin of David’s first wife Mary Ann as Benjamin and Submit were brother and sister, both children of John Hall and his wife Submit.

John Williams Coon, MD
John Williams Coon, MD

Assuming that the responsibilities of caring for such a large family as a widower were too much for David after the death of Mary Ann, the younger children went to other families. Elam Dennis went to the Matthew’s family, who later adopted him. He took the last name Matthews. Orilla went to live with a family named Ellis, who later adopted her, and Hiram lived with a different Matthews family (although related to the family who took Elam) but later returned to live with his father and his father’s new wife, Isabel.

Leaving his farm close to Bloomingfield in Waushara County and proceeding to Berlin to enlist in the army, he was told he had to leave right away to proceed to Madison. His departure for camp Randall was so quick, he did not have time to go back and tell his family he was leaving. They only found out in a letter dated February 28, 1864 that he “…enlisted in the 36th Regiment.” David enlisted in the Union army from Green Lake County on February 26, 1864 and served as a Private in Co. A, 36th Wisconsin Infantry, and is recorded on his military documents dated August 15, 1861 as being 5 feet, 8 3/8 inches in height with blue eyes and sandy hair. The following is an excerpt from the foreward of the original typed transcription of David Coon Letters, prepared in 1913 in Wales, Wisconsin by his son, John W. Coon, MD.

“David Coon was a great man, a kind husband and father, a true soldier of the American type, not only a patriot but a philosopher.” During his service in the Civil War, David wrote frequently and consistently, approximately one letter per week, to his wife and children, his devotion to all being very evident. Even if he did not have any stationary to write on he made sure they knew he was okay. He once wrote a letter on the label of a condensed milk can. As described by his son John W. Coon, MD in the typed transcription he prepared of his father’s letter home, “Many of the letters were written on such scraps of paper as were available, the ink being often very poor — in one instance at least, made from the juice of pokeberries gathered on the battlefield.”

Forest Cemetery, Stephens Point, Portage County, Wisconsin
Forest Cemetery, Stephens Point, Portage County, WisconsinSources

David was stationed with his regiment at Camp Randall until May 10, 1864, where he nursed the sick at the hospital before being sent to battle. He was then ordered to join Hancock’s Corps in Virginia where he participated in many of the noted great battles of that campaign.On May 8, 1864, he sent a letter to his family telling them that he was to be sent away to Washington to join General Grant’s Army.The regiment moved from battle to battle. They hardly ever had time to rest. During a battle, Coon was captured by a Confederate officer and was handcuffed for two hours. The officer let him go with a note of warning. Coon wrote to his family, “He offered to let me go back to the regiment but wanted me to promise to be a better boy.”Not until August did the regiment start to travel again. They went to Richmond where they fought against the rebels. When they finished they returned to their camp near Petersburg. On August 25, 1864, he, along with 11 officers and 175 other men from the regiment, posted themselves at Reams Station on the Weldon Railroad. Before long, he, along with 133 other men from his regiment were reported missing. On August 27, Coon wrote a letter to his family telling them that he and 127 other men had been captured and taken prisoner. He talked about how the officers and guards had treated them fairly until then and he wrote that he was expecting to be sent to Libby Prison in Richmond and for his family to keep up courage. That was his last letter. He was first held in Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia, then at Belle Isle, later being transferred again to Salisbury Prison in North Carolina.

Salisbury Prison was one of the best Confederate prisons. However, soon after David and the other men arrived, the conditions grew worse. The prison became over crowded with 10,000 people in a space that had reached capacity one year before Coon arrived. Living in these terribly overcrowded conditions, one third of the prisoners, or 35,000 men, died. David Coon was one of these. The diary of James Canon, a Sergeant in the same company, states in a simple entry dated November 2, 1864, “David Coon died today.” He was buried the same day in Forest Cemetery at Stephens Point, Portage County, Wisconsin.

Souces:

  1. Matthews, Dennis, 1910 US Census, Louisa County, Iowa.
  2. Coon, David, 1860 US Census, Bloomfield, Waushara County, Wisconsin; Ancestry.com .
  3. David Coon and Family tombstone, Stevens Point Cemetery, Wisconsin.
  4. Emily Bailey, “David Coon and Family Background,” e-mail message from < [email protected]> to Christine Blythe, 19 Nov 2006.
  5. Emily Bailey, “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message from <[email protected] aol.com> to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  6. Military Bounty Land Warrant – David Coon – 27 Nov 1854.
  7. Act of Sept. 28 1850 Land Warrant Card – Coon, W.B. and Coon, David.
  8. Military Bounty Land Location Record.
  9. Military Bounty Land Warrant Certificate – Coon, William B.
  10. David Coon, “Hiram Coon Biographical Information,” e-mail message from < [email protected]> to Christine Blythe, 21 Nov 2006.
  11. Widow’s Declaration of Pension – Isabel Ann Coon (5 M ar 1865).
  12. Statement of Pension Claim of Nathan H. Matthews (16 Mar 1870).
  13. Coon, David, death certificate no. Widow’s Claim to Pension – Emma and Hiram Coon (1864).
  14. Sworn Statement re Matthew Coon’s Birth, compiler, (27 Feb 1867).
  15. Statement re David Coon’s Children.
  16. Claim for Increase of Widow’s Pension – Coon, Isabel – 22 Aug 1865 (22 Aug 1865).
  17. Widow’s Pension Statement – Isabel A. Coon (15 Se p 1893).
  18. Notice of Death of Isabel Coon to Pension Agent.
  19. Wisconsin Civil War Volunteers Roster – C (Coon), Wisconsin Historical Museum online
  20. Claim for Widow’s Pension – Isabel A. Coon (1865).
  21. Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams (31 Mar 1869 ).
  22. Statement of Isabel Coon re Custody of Children (4 M ay 1870).
  23. Sworn Statement of Isabel A. Coon re Orilla Coon (2 8 Jun 1869).
  24. Statement of Minister re Marriage of David and Isabel Coon (24 Mar 1875).
  25. Statement of Clerk re Missing Marriage Record of David Coon (8 Apr).
  26. 1850 OH, Licking, Alexandria, M432_702, Page 170 Dwelling 66, Family 68
  27. http://web.archive.org/web/20000601082635/http://madison.k12.wi.u s/wright/civilwar/36regmet.

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Transcription: Partial will of Robert Owen of Pennsylvania’s Welsh tract.

Transcription: Partial will of Robert Owen of Pennsylvania’s Welsh tract.

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The following is a transcript of the partial image of the will of Robert Owen of the Welsh Tract in Pennsylvania, scanned from “Merion in the Welsh Tract”. I’ve been able to find any reference to the missing top portion of the will.

 

Robert Owen will
Partial will of Robert Owen.

…????? fifty pound for & towards ye mantenance & pre?????ment of my other children which sume I doe wholey reffer to ye di????? of my here after named Legatees to be shared & divided among them as they find convenient & see cause

Also I doe constitute nominate & appoint my trusty & wellbeloved ffriends John Humphrey Hugh Roberts, John Roberts, Griffith John, Robert Jones, Robert Roberts, Robert Lloyd & Rowland Ellis to be trustees and overseers of this my will & testament, And doe hereby give full power to my forementioned friends to be my trustees to manage & dispose off my estate according to ye true ??? ??? of this my will & testament to ye best proffitt & advantage of my children.

Lastly I doe nominate & appoint my wellbeloved Cosin Griffith John abovenamed to be sole Executor of this my last will & testament. And doe hereby revoke & anull & make void all former wills by me hereto fore made In wittness whereof I have  hereunto sett my hand & seal the second day of ye tenth month in ye year 1697

Signed sealed & published in ye sight & presence of
Robt Owen     ‘SEAL’
John Owen
Rowland Ellis
Robt Jones

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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John ap Evan (John Bevan) of Wales

John ap Evan (John Bevan) of Wales

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John Bevan was the 12th great grandfather to my children. He was born 1646 in Treverigg, Llantrisant, Glamorgan, Wales, and was one of five children of Evan ap John (1600-1665) and his wife Jane ferch Richard (born 1645).

 

John Bevan's Signature
Signature of John Bevan (ap Evan).

According to “Merion in the Welsh Tract”, the Bevan “family of Treverigg was one of the most ancient in Glamorgan, and possessed considerable wealth for that day. The Bevans descended in the direct male line from the ancient Princes or Lords of Glamorgan, whose lineage is traceable for many generations back to the old Cymric Kings of the Island of Britain.”

His parents having died while he was very young, John inherited their very large estate, his brothers and sisters being excluded from the inheritance. Being a man of conscience, he provided for his brothers and sisters from the inheritance.

Treverigg Meeting House
Meeting house built by John Bevan on his estate in Treverigg.
Barbara Bevan's Signature
Signature of Barbara Bevan.

In 1665, at the age of 19, John married Barbara Catherine Aubrey (1637-1710) and became a Minister of the Society of Friends in Wales soon after. He built the Friends’ Meeting House on his estate in Treverigg, Glamorgan.

Over the next fifteen years, they had six children:

  • Jane Bevan (born 1667) married John Wood of Darby in 1687.
  • Evan Bevan (1674-1720) married Eleanor Wood of Darby in 1693.
  • Katharine Bevan (born 1675)
  • Lady Ann Bevan (1676-1723)
  • Elizabeth Bevan (born 1678) married Joseph Richardson of Philadelphia in 1697.
  • Barbara Bevan

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Genealogy and bio: Evan Isaac Shelby of Tregaron, Wales

Genealogy and bio: Evan Isaac Shelby of Tregaron, Wales

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Evan Isaac Shelby of Tregaron, Wales was the son of David Phillip “Phillip” Shelby (1648-1731) and Margaretta Alexander (1660-    ) and was the one who was honored by future namesakes including Brigadier General Evan Shelby(The original data, images and more on this individual and family are also available on Blythe Genealogy.)

Also believed to have used the nickname ‘Dhu’ (meaning black), he was born about 1694 at the beginning of the reign of William and Mary (1690-1695), and was baptised on September 2, 1694 at St. Caron’s Church in Tregaron, Cardiganshire, Wales.

He was most likely a farmer and/or shepherd in Wales as these occupations were very common in the mountainous region.  Although he would be considered illiterate, he could write his name.

He married Catherina “Catherine” Morgan (1697-1751) on November 9, 1716 in Tregaron, Cardiganshire, Wales and they had 11 children:  Moses Shelby (1718-1776); Brig General Evan S. Shelby Jr. (1720-1794); Rees (Reece) Shelby (1721-1802); Capt. John Shelby (1724-1794); Mary Hannah Shelby (1725-1805); Thomas (James) Shelby (1725-1760); David Shelby (1730-1799); Rachel Shelby (1732-    ); Mary Shelby (1735-1813); Eleanor Shelby (1736-    ); and Solomon Shelby (1738-    ).

Approximately seven years after the succession of George II to the throne, Evan Shelby, then about forty years old, emigrated to America with his family, ultimately settling in Pennsylvania (then Penn’s province).

The “Blunstone License Book” of Lancaster County in the land office in the capital at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, shows that Evan Shelby was licensed on July 4, 1735, to take up three hundred acres in the then Indian owned territory west of the Susquehanna River.  Here the Shelbys settled on a beautiful spot on the east bank of Conococheague Creek on Potomoc Road, at the junction with Muddy Run, naming their farm “Black Walnut Point”.  It was in Lancaster County (now Antrim, Franklin County) “between Neild’s FFRIEND (sic) and Edward Nichols”, five miles north of the Maryland (Mason-Dixon) line,  north of the bridge over the Conococheague.

Two years later he was licensed to acquire an additional 200 hundred acres at Rocky Spring, somewhere near his first tract.

In late 1739, after his home had  been seized to satisfy a debt he owed to a Richard Phillips, he relocated to Maryland, having acquired two warrants for twelve hundred acres in Prince George’s County, in the area which is now the Indian Spring District of Washington County, on June 7, 1739.  One tract, called “Rich Lands” was approximately northwest of the site of Hagerstown and had been owned by Dr. Robert Stuart of Annapolis.

The other, a 1,000 acre tract which he named “Maiden’s Choice”, seems to have been his home plantation. It was a narrow and irregular shaped tract that stretched from the Pennsylvania line southward along the base of the North Mountain three and a half miles.  Evan built a house that was situated at the south end, probably on the road that later connected Clear Springs, Maryland, to Mercerburg, Pennsylvania.

On the 26 Feb 1745, Evan sold 54 acres of “Maiden’s Choice” to his son Evan Jr.

Evan Sr. obtained other land warrants and secured patents on them over the next eleven years, until he was in possession of 2,500 acres.  With the exception of “Rich Lands” and a 50 acre piece called “Hunt’s Cabin”, all of Shelby’s lands seem to have been located between Conococheague Creek and the east side of North Mountain.

He periodically sold some of his land and also gave some as gifts to his sons.   It is recorded in the Testamentary Proceedings on file at Annapolis that  his wife, Catherine, and son, Evan Jr., filed a bond on July 18, 1751, as administrators of his estate. However, since he had conveyed a piece of land to his son John on May 19, 1751, his death must have occurred between those two dates when he was about 56 years old.

He died and was buried at North Mountain, Frederick County (now Washington County), Maryland. His will was probated on July 18, 1751, also at Frederick County.

The Shelby family is identified with the early history of Tennessee and Kentucky, and they share, with the Seviers and Isbells, the honor of having had the greatest number of representatives in the Battle of King’s Mountain. There were seven Seviers, six Isbells and six Shelbys who participated.

By coincidence, the youngest soldiers in that same battle were of the same families: James Sevier, sixteen; William Isbell, fifteen; and David Shelby, seventeen.

Evan Isaac Shelby died intestate and his will was probated July 18, 1751, with his wife Catherine and his son Evan Jr. as Executors.  The record of the naming of Catherine and Evan as Executors for the purposes of probate is as follows (verbatim):

Adm Bond 18 Jul Maryland ss Charles, Absolute Lord and Proprietary of the Province of Maryland and Avalon, Lord Baron of Baltimore, &c, To Catherine Shelby & Evan Shelby Greeting. Whereas Evan Shelby died Intestate, as it is said, We do therefore give and grant unto the said Catherine Shelby and Evan Shelby full power and Authority to Administer all and singular of the Goods, Chattels, and Credits, of the said Deceased: and to exhibit both into our Office for Probate of Wills, &c. Lawfully authorized; touching which Inventory you are presently assigned to perform, or at farthest at or before the 15th Day of October now next ensuing; and an Account within Twelve Months from the Date of these Presents. And lastly, We do hereby constitute and appoint you the said Catherine Shelby & Evan Shelby  Administrators of all and singular the Goods, Chattels, and Credits of the said Deceased. Given at Frederick County this 18 Day of July in the 37th Year of our Dominion, &c. Annoque Domini 1751The Inventory of Evan’s estate did not appear to be very valuable but indicates that he had several slaves. His sons Moses and John signed as next of kin August 6, 1751. James Davies and Isaac Baker signed as witnesses. The sale took place at the home of Evan Shelby Sr. on September 6, 1751.

Later records indicate that the sale did not cover all of Evan’s debts, as by 1754 Catherine and son Evan, Jr. were still being sued for his debts.The following ‘vendue’ was taken from the records of the clerk’s office, Frederick County, Maryland.

His estate inventory was recorded as follows:

First. Whoever buys the value of 20 shillings and upward shall have nine months’ credit; and whosoever buyeth under the value of 20 shillings shall pay before he, or they, shall move any particulars, and the highest bidder shall be the buyer after three distinct crings. The administrators reserve one bidding for themselves at every particular, and if, in case any one should return back any of these goods to the damage or hindrance of said sale, shall pay 2 shillings per pound to said administrators, and that every one shall give sufficient security.signed: Evan Shelby, Jr Catherine Shelby.

Inventory of Evan Shelby Sr 1751 MD Frederick Co Inventory made 6 Aug. A True Inventory of the appeasement of the goods….of Evan Shelby late of Frederick County Deceased in current money so far as the same hat been brought to the Sight and Knowledge of us the appraisers having first Qualified according to the Directions and authority to us Given before Nathaniel Alexander one of the Justices of the Peace for said County the sixth day of August 1751 Imprimis [L=pound s=Sterling d=?] To his Ridding horse saddle & Bridle & his apparel 14L 10s To 6 heads of horses 12L To 10 heads of old hordes mares & colts 24L To 7 cows 14L 10s To 16 young cattle & calves 1 heifer & 1 steer 23L 16s To 24 sheep 4L 10s To 13 head of swine 3L 5s To 25 shoats 2L 10s To household goods 14L 9s 6d To plow & harrow and some old irons 3L 6s 8d To 2 stacks of winter grain 4L To 3 servants George Mercy 10L To Mary Sterling 5L To Ben Knight a mulatto 10L To a blind servant man named John Harvey 9s The above appraised by us as witness our hands James Davies Isaac Baker Signed by the nearest kin: Moses (M) Shelby and John Shelby. Geo. Gorton, Creditor; William Belle Jun Cruder

There is a family story that has been passed down through generations. Although there is no recorded evidence to support any of it, it’s worth mentioning in this post as follows:

It is said that David Phillip (Phillip) Selby was a knight living in a small castle in Cardiganshire, Wales.  He was obliged to support the King of England by sending men to fight when ordered.  The King requested the men and Shelby sent them to Ireland under command of his son Evan.

After the end of the campaign, Evan’s family was disgraced when he returned with an Irish, Roman Catholic bride.  His parents demanded that she be sent back to Ireland and the marriage be annulled. At that time, Protestants could be executed for marrying Catholics.

Evan refused.  He attempted to settle but everyone shunned him – including his parents.  As a result, Evan emigrated to America with his wife and children.

These circumstances are believed to be the reason Evan never named a son for his father Phillip. His mother was Margaretta Alexander and name ‘Margaret’ has been passed down through the descendants for generations.

Tombstone of Evan Dhu Shelby
Tombstone of a later namesake, Evan Dhu Shelby.

AUTHOR’S NOTE:

There is some dispute about whether the use of the nickname ‘Dhu’ is valid. The baptism record in Wales does not mention ‘Dhu’ at all. However, there are enough other secondary sources that do mention the nickname ‘Dhu’ that I prefer to keep it in my database until there is proof that it indeed was not used. Most of these are written record, but there is a tombstone of a later Evan Shelby for whom the nickname ‘Dhu’ is documented on his tombstone.

The baptism record is the argument used by detractors against the validity of this nickname, but it’s my experience being from a family of French origin where the use of nicknames were rampant, that the nicknames never appeared on birth and baptism records. The nickname only started appearing later when it was assigned by friends and family for a particular reason.

Photo by Aeronian at en.wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0

Sources:
1.  Birth Registration; Shelby, Moses; 1728; Family Data Collection – Births.
2.  US and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900; Shelby, Evan, m. 1778.
3.  Family Data Collection – Births; Shelby, Eleanor; b. 1736.
4.  Family Data Collection – Births; Shelby, Solomon, b. 1738.
5.  Passenger and Immigration Lists Index; Shelby, Evan, 1750; 1500s-1900s.
6.  Passenger and Immigration Lists Index; Shelby, Evan; 1500s-1900s; 1735; Pennsylvania; Source Pub. Code 9448.
7.  Family Data Collection – Individual Records; Shelby, Mary; b. 1735.
8.  Shelby Historical Data (Chronology for Evan Shelby, Jr. and Letitia Cox), online [http://images.google.ca), accessed.
9.  Janet D. Schonert, Chasin’ Shelbys: A Basic Outline of the Descendants of Jonathan, Jacob, Rees Shelby, , Ancestry.com , (http://search.ancestry.com).
10. Soldiers of the American Revolution from Franklin County,  database, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.com).
11. History of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 1887; Warner, Beers, and Co.; Chicago; Pg 153 (Little Cove).
12. Inventories (1751-2), No. 48 T.A.S., page 332, at the Land Commissioner’s office, Frederick County, Maryland.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

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The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

 

Bolivia

Liberia

Poland

Ukraine

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

 

Australia

United Kingdom

United States

 


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It’s important to know naming conventions for genealogy #namingconventions.

It’s important to know naming conventions for genealogy #namingconventions.

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I have learned to pay close attention to the names of individuals in my research as knowledge of naming conventions can be key to investigating a family’s genealogy. Frequently, the names provide valuable clues to the answers to my questions.

 

Individuals from differing cultures, time periods, religions and families were known to follow specific traditions and naming conventions. It’s important to know these naming conventions for genealogy research as accuracy of your conclusions can be adversely affected by misinterpreting names, titles, etc.

 

These practices could also change over time according to the practices of the day.

Below are some examples of naming practices I encountered in my research.

It’s very important to note that making assumptions in genealogy using only naming conventions is dangerous as these conventions were not followed by everyone. However, knowing naming conventions can be great help finding an ancestor as long as the other information matches to confirm the identity.

 

France

Last names in France.
Last names in France.
  • Instead of surnames as we know them, the French in the 17th and 18th centuries routinely adopted nicknames or titles denoted by the word ‘dit’  or ‘dite’ before it. This title or nickname could have referred to any number of things including a descriptive term, location, family or property in France. This was the case for my ancestor, Pierre dit Laverdure, one of the Huguenots to settle in Acadia in the mid-17th century. I couldn’t find the translation for ‘Laverdure’, but I was able to find a modern translation for ‘verdure’ as follows:

ver·dure
a. The lush greenness of flourishing vegetation.
b. Vigorous greenery.
2. A fresh or flourishing condition: the verdure of childhood.

[Middle English, from Old French, from verd, green, from Latin viridis.]

My reasoning is that, based on this definition, there are several possibilities, including: he was from a lush, green, fertile area of France; he was involved in forest management or forestry; he was in a profession concerned with vegetation such as farming; the ‘fresh or flourishing condition’ referred to in the definition above could allude to his being ‘young’, ‘youthful’, ‘vigorous’, or ‘junior’ to someone.

 

French Canada

 

  • Giving all children of the same gender the same middle name, usually in honor of a relative or ancestor.
  • Naming children after parents and grandparents (either given or middle name).
  • After the death of a child, they frequently used the name for a sibling born later.
  • Children were often given hyphenated first and middle names (i.e. Marie-Madeleine or Jean-Jacques), but they would frequently adopt one or the other for everyday use.
  • French-Canadians and Metis in early days often followed the original French convention of using the prefix of ‘dit’ or ‘ditte’ as above.

 

African-Americans

 

  • During and after the civil war, slaves frequently adopted the surname of their current or previous owner.

 

Ireland

Irish surnames.
Irish surnames.

Boys

  • 1st son was named after the father’s father.
  • 2nd son was named after the mother’s father.
  • 3rd son was named after the father.
  • 4th son was named after the father’s eldest brother.

Girls

  • 1st daughter was named after the mother’s mother.
  • 2nd daughter was named after the father’s mother.
  • 3rd daughter was named after the mother.
  • 4th daughter was named after the mother’s eldest sister

 

UK, USA and Canada

British last names.
British last names.
  • One or more children in a family, regardless of gender, were frequently given their mother’s maiden name as a middle name to carry that name on within the family. Infrequently, I have seen  families where one or more of the children had the mother’s maiden name as a middle name.

 

Wales

 

  • In Wales, individuals carried their father’s given name as a surname, preceded by a term signifying whether they were male or female. The son of a man named Rhys would use the surname ‘ap (or ab) Rhys’ and a daughter would use ‘ferch (or verch) Rhys’.

 

Scotland

Scottish clan map.
Scottish clan map.
  • In Scotland, children were usually given first names according to the following: first son is named after his father’s father; the second son is named after his mother’s father; the third son is named after his father; the first daughter is named after her mother’s mother; the second daughter is named after her father’s mother; and the third daughter is named after her mother.
  • The surname used depended on the region the family came from. For the most part, in the Scottish highlands, the child’s surname was a combination of the prefix ‘Mc’ or ‘Mac’ followed by the given name or variation of the father (i.e. Jonathan McKenzie – the son of Kenneth). In the lowlands, the suffix ‘son’ was added to the given name of the father, as in Johnson, Robertson, Jacobson, etc.
  • The Scottish were also known to take a surname from a location, occupation, and/or physical characteristic.

 

China

 

  • Chinese immigrants frequently took on entirely new names – both given and surnames – in the language of the their new country. Sometimes they would choose names that sounded phonetically similar to their original Chinese names.

 

Japan

 

  • Japanese names put surname first and given name last. However, names were frequently changed to follow the western convention of given name first and surname last when emigrating to the west.

 

Roman Catholics

 

  • Roman Catholics frequently named their children after saints or choose names from the bible, especially in French-Canadian and latin families.

 

Scandinavia and Iceland

Scandinavian last names.
Scandinavian last names.
  • The children adopted a modified version of the given name of the father as a surname, by adding ‘son’ at the end of the father’s given name. For example, in my husband’s family in Sweden, the name in America was Gummeson, originating with David Gummeson, who was the son of Gumme Svensson, who in turn was the son of Sven Hakansson. For female children, the same practice occurred, but the added suffix was either ‘dottir’ or ‘dotter’, as in Gummesdottir. This could frequently change upon immigration to the west to comply with western naming conventions.

 

Non-specific

 

  • Families often adopted naming traditions such as the first-born son and/or daughter being named in some way after either a parent, grandparent or other close relative.
  • Some changed their surname for personal or cultural reasons. In my own family on my father’s side, a male ancestor took exception to his surname of Turmel/Turmelle. In French tradition, the suffix ‘elle’ signifies the female gender. This gentleman had his surname legally changed to Turmaine and it’s carried on in this form to the present day. Other branches of the family retained the Turmel/Turmelle surname.
  • Others changed their surnames for religious reasons. As seen in a recent episode of ‘Who Do You Think You Are’, actress Helen Hunt discovered that an ancestor of hers had changed her name from Rafenberg to Roberts – most likely to escape anti-semitism, especially as she was a widow trying to support her family.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 21 Oct 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 21 Oct 2015.

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Oliver Stillwell Jones

The following are lists of the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 21 Oct 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions.

 

Dominican Republic

El Salvador

Italy

Russia

New Zealand

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

 

Canada

Italy

New Zealand

South Africa

United Kingdom

United States


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Medieval Genealogy Research: Myth vs. Fact

Medieval Genealogy Research: Myth vs. Fact

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I have found my many years of our family genealogy research to be both difficult and rewarding; especially medieval research when one has to distinguish between myth and fact. There is no feeling like breaking down a ‘brick wall’ and finding solid support and/or primary genealogy sources to document the finds.

 

There are a few sites for ancestry research that I consider to be ‘gold standard’. I have itemized these global and Canadian sites in my previous post ‘O Canada!‘ and on the site’s ‘Genealogy Links‘ pages.

Research into my husband’s royal and Welsh Quaker family history has been consistently rewarding and I was able to find sources without a great deal of difficulty – until I reached the medieval period. I spent a great amount of time searching for reliable and respected sites and usually had to resort to entering unsupported data until I could locate sources for verification.

The truth of the matter is that medieval genealogy research incorporates fact and myth and it can be very difficult to verify information as few primary sources are available.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy LogoThe one site I have found and rely upon the most is that of the ‘Foundation for Medieval Genealogy‘, a non-profit organization consisting of British genealogists and historians with a special interest in the medieval period. They seek to educate in, promote research in and publish results from the study of medieval genealogy.

It is possible to search for specific individuals. However, one thing I have learned is that name spellings can vary greatly. When researching one individual, I will usually search for them first and then close family members second. Once a family member is identified, it’s a simple matter of comparing the data of the others to identify duplicates for merge.

To access the digital collections, it is necessary to register. I have never registered, but I have been able to obtain information by using their open genealogical database that does not require registration.

Those responsible for this database have made every effort to cite the best possible sources in support of their conclusions and deductions. I especially like and respect the fact that they make it clear when information is speculative and provide detailed explanations of their conclusions. Any information that is speculative or unsupported is contained within square brackets (i.e. ‘[ ]’). Facts supported by sources are signified by numerical links to the source citation.

I consider this site to be the best source for medieval genealogy research and would not hesitate to recommend it for such.


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Transcription: Obituary for General George Cadwalader

Transcription: Obituary for General George Cadwalader

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Following is the transcription of the obituary for General George Cadwalader, published in the Bucks County Gazette on Thursday, February, 6, 1879.

 

Obituary; General George Cadwalader
Obituary for General George Cadwalader

General George Cadwalader died in Philadelphia, on Monday afternoon, in the seventy-third year of his age, from an attack resembling apoplexy, with which he was seized on Sunday night. He was a brother of Judge Cadwalader, who died on Sunday week, and was the last of the five sons of General Thomas Cadwalader. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1806, engaged in mercantile business, and filled the position of President of the Mutual Insurance Company for a third of a century. He served gallantly in the Mexican War as well as in the Slaveholders’ Rebellion, and distinguished himself in both positions. His record is one of the best which he can safely leave behind as a grand inheritance to his family and friends.

___________________

The image of the image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for Leonard Scott Keefer and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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Researching Welsh Quakers in Pennsylvania.

Researching Welsh Quakers in Pennsylvania.

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Welsh Quaker ancestors are the cultural group from which the majority of the ancestors of my children originate (on my husband’s side).

 

One of the benefits of researching this culture is that the people were religious, often educated (could read and write) and were very good at documenting vital statistics and events. As a result, there are several very good written resources available that directly cite or are based upon this documented data.

The following are valuable, highly informational links to texts and websites focusing on Welsh Quaker pioneers in Pennsylvania.

 

Texts

William Penn
William Penn

Websites


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Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

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Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

 

WOGAMAN, BURKETT, HOLDERY

Author:     Ezra McFall Kuhns
Publisher:     [Dayton, Ohio? : s.n., 1948]
Series:      Genealogy & local history, G7296.

BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT
(First Page)

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery

It has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1743, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley, Jehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners”. Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects, Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coin

BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT
(Second Page)

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery

cidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of this life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina, who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27, 1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13, 1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett, of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. It should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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British Ancestry: a mixture of genetic DNA from other populations.

British Ancestry: a mixture of genetic DNA from other populations.

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Genetic signatures have been found among Britons that strongly illustrate their historical roots from various locations of the UK, resulting in a highly detailed and descriptive map of genetic variations. The analysis shows clusters of genetic variation within the late 1800s, when the population was less migratory, and reflects historical waves of migration by a variety of groups of people into the island.

 

According to Peter Donnelly, the Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in Oxford, England, “The patterns we see are extraordinary. “The genetic effects we’re looking at are the result of, probably, thousands of years of history.”

DNA Map of UK migration.
Each symbol represents an individual at the center of their grandparents’ birthplaces. The tree (top right) DNA map of UK migration shows how the clusters are related. Photo credit: University of Oxford

Today, few Britons have ancestors from only one region of the United Kingdom. Therefore, it’s difficult to find patterns of genetic variation originating from a specific place.

However, the team found Britons that lived in rural areas and knew that their grandparents were all born within less than eighty kilometers. Since the DNA of these people was a blend of their grandparents’ DNA, it was expected that their genetic variations would be from within the geographic regions of their grandparents.

Participants were lumped into groups based specifically on their genetic DNA, and the geography of these groups matched significantly. Those from across central and southern Britain were in the most important cluster. Several groupings within this main group were much more isolated.

Those whose ancestry can be traced back to the archipelago, off the northeast coast of Scotland, fell into three distinct classes. This isolation most likely was a result of the islands creating difficulties in movement among various populations.

As well as the influence of geographic barriers, the overall picture resulted from migrations into and around the UK.

Genomes of people from continental Europe were analysed to gain insight into the scope of their ancestors’ contributions to Britons’ genetic ancestry. The flow of Anglo-Saxons from contemporary Germany into the UK after the departure of the Romans in 410 AD was indicated. Rather than displacing the resident population, they interbred.

Surprisingly, the Vikings, who occupied the UK during the four centuries from 700 AD to 1100 AD, had very little influence on the genetic makeup of Britons.

Britons or those with British heritage may conceivably use their DNA to trace the homelands of their ancestors.

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Sources:

Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.

Callaway, Ewan; UK Mapped out by genetic ancestry; http://www.nature.com/news/uk-mapped-out-by-genetic-ancestry-1.17136


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 27 Feb 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 27 Feb 2015.

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Following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 27 Feb 2015.
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions from around the world.” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/map-595790_640-e1425057704310.png” alt=”Worldwide Map” width=”349″ height=”303″ /> Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions from around the world.
FamilySearch.org

Argentina

Australia

Brazil

Canada

Ireland

Philippines

Puerto Rico

Slovakia

United States

Worldwide

Zimbabwe

Ancestry.com

United Kingdom

United States


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