Tag: soldiers

In Remembrance.

In Remembrance.

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Being from a dedicated military family, this is a somber time of year for us, in remembrance of those in our families who have served, or worse yet, who we lost during military service.

 

The relationships to our children, Erin and Stuart, are in italics following the excerpt.


Remembering those we lost in battle:

 

Coon, David 1843

  • Elisha Cadwallader (1840-1862) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • Private Joseph Turmaine (1889-1916) – First World War(great granduncle)
    • The 27th Battalion, Winnipeg Regiment left at 2 pm, September 14, 1916 for brigade headquarters, arriving at 5 pm. They then left brigade headquarters at 9 pm and proceeded to the front line to take up position in assembly trenches, which was delayed due to congestion of the trenches…

 

Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery


Veterans in our family who later passed away:

 

 

Cadwalader, General John Cadwalader (Revolutionary War)

  • General John Cadwalader (1742-1785) – Revolutionary War (3rd cousin, 11x removed)
  • Nathan “Hoppity-Kickity” Porter (1742-1815) – French and Indian War (7th great grandfather)

 

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

  • Governor Isaac Shelby (1750-1826) – Revolutionary War, War of 1812 (1st cousin, 8x removed)
    • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada
  • Private John Jaquish (1753-1845) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)
  • Quartermaster Joseph Shelby (1787-1846) – Indian Wars (5th great grandfather)
  • James Shreve (rank unknown) (1754-1839) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)

 

Cadwalader, Gen. Thomas.jpg

  • General Thomas Cadwalader (1779-1841) – War of 1812. (3rd cousin 10x removed)

 

Jaques, William H

  • William Henry Jaques (1820-1913) – Civil War (4th great granduncle)
  • Laurent Jude Melanson (1820-1914) – Fenian Raids (3rd great grandfather)
  • Alfred E. Melanson (c. 1847-?) – Fenian Raids (2nd great granduncle)
  • Private Robinson Coke “Boby” Jones (1822-1897) – Mexican War (4th great grandfather)
  • Private William Seth Cadwallader (1825-    ) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • John Mumby Blythe (1831-    ) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Private Francis Elmer Keefer (1839-1863) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Charles George Blythe (1840-1914) – Civil War(3rd great grandfather)
    • …his descendants remained in the Louth and Somercotes areas of Lincolnshire until the emigration of his great grandson Thomas Blyth and Thomas’  sons Charles George (3rd great grandfather to Erin and Stuart), John Mumby and Robert to America…

 

Keefer, Lenard Scott 2 (maybe) proof needed

  • Leonard Scott Keefer (1841-1916) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)

 

Wedding of Elam Dennis Matthews St.

  • William Dennis Matthews (1875-1940) – Spanish American War(2nd great grandfather)
    • Bip, Fred, White and I went down to the armory this evening The Governor’s (Tanner) order, for all Illinois regiments to move to Springfield was read and great applause followed. Came home about 9 o’clock and packed up my belongings…
  • Clayton William Blythe (1883-1943) – First World War (2nd great grandfather)
    • The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records.
  • Wesley Elmer Blythe (1890-1977) – First World War (2nd great granduncle)
  • Hervé “Hervey” Turmel (1894-    ) – First World War (4th cousin, 3x removed)

 

Luther Gummeson

  • Private Luther Gummeson (1895-1934) – First World War (great granduncle)
    • Before enlisting for military service on December 10, 1917, he was a Lutheran and a farmer in Vancouver, BC. Rumour had it that his early death was attributed to being gassed during WWI. Before his death, Luther was living in the Peace River area…
  • Joseph Antonio Tumel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Alfred Turmel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Chester C. Blythe (1908-1995) – General Service (great grandfather)
  • Doyle Clement Cadwallader (1925-1944) (6th cousin, 5x removed)
    • “In the midst of life we are in death.
      In the moment that ye think not,
      In the twinkling of an eye,
      The Angel of Death may appear.”
    • The foregoing quotation seems to me very fitting for Doyle Clement Cadwallader, whose death was caused by an automobile accident while he was returning home on September 30, 1944…

 

Dad, c. 1955.


Veterans in our family who are still living:

 

Marsh-at-Night-at-Cabin-Small.jpg

 

Mark and I with my Mom and Dad at our wedding.

 

For more facts and dates about the above mentioned individuals, check out our family’s extensive genealogy database linked in the menu bar above.


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Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

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Although both sides of my family are ‘French Canadian,’ my mother’s ancestors are Acadians who settled in the maritime provinces and the eastern seaboard of the United States. Dad, however, is the link to our Québecois French Canadian and military heritage.
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine at 3 circa 1938.

In earlier posts about our family’s WWI war casualties, I discussed our family’s attachment to the Canadian military. My own father, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine, was an Instrument Electrical Technician in the Canadian Armed Forces for almost thirty years.

Gerard Turmaine in full pipe bank regalia playing his snare drum.
Gerard Turmaine in full pipe band regalia playing his snare drum.

Born in 1934 to Henry Joseph Turmaine and Rose Amande Emery of Quebec, he was nephew to both family members we lost in WWI, Joseph Philias Albert Emery (Rose’s brother) and Joseph Turmaine (Henry’s half-brother). (See photo at right of Gerry Turmaine at age 3.) As a new Canadian forces member, he spent some time in New Brunswick visiting the family of another recruit, Paul Melanson and met my mother, Patricia Gail Melanson – Paul’s sister.

Shortly after, he was transferred to Baden Söllingen, Germany and a long distance relationship proceeded for a while until he eventually asked my mother to go over and marry him. She traveled over on ship, they were married, and just over a year later I was born.

A year after my birth, my father was posted to Trenton, Ontario by the Canadian military, where we lived for ten years. During this time, he was a member of the national military pipe band (see photo at left) and frequently played all around the nation – and on one occasion, I can remember him traveling to Washington, DC to play.  During the ten years we lived in Trenton, my parents had three more girls, my sisters Renee, Andrea and Danielle.

We finally left Trenton when my parents’ dream came true and we were transferred to Comox, British Columbia. I can remember my parents talking about how much they’d like to live on the west coast of Canada for years. As a matter of fact, the story told ever after was that my Dad was so happy at the news of our transfer to British Columbia he wore holes in his socks dancing around the coffee table.

Their intention to remain in British Columbia was evident when my Dad told his superiors in Comox that he would rather forego any further promotions in order to remain in British Columbia until he retired. My parents lived in Comox until his death in 2005.

Turmaine Family in the late 1960's.
Turmaine family photo with Gerry in rear on the right; middle: Renee, Christine, Gail and Andrea; front: Danielle.

Twenty years ago I met my husband while he was training in Comox. He was an Aviation Technician with the Canadian Armed Forces and retired in 2006 to take a position with Marshall Aerospace in Abbotsford, British Columbia – where he could continue to work on his favorite aircraft, the CC130 Hercules.

To add to the tradition, my husband’s father, Marsh Blythe, retired in the 1980’s as a Sergeant in the Canadian army and my sister Andrea’s husband Larry Potter also retired several years ago from the Canadian army.


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We can honor our ancestral war heroes on the internet.

We can honor our ancestral war heroes on the internet.

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Memorial wall for Isaac Shelby

I take great pride in our family’s military history in both Canada and the United States and have been researching our ancestral war heroes for decades now.

There is a special emotional connection with these people that is not there for others and it’s based in my own appreciation for them and their sacrifices on behalf of the rest of us.

I just learned that Fold3 has launched ” The Honor Wall “, a memorial site dedicated to those who served in the military forces in the United States throughout history.

Right away, I had to check it out and found pages for some of our ancestors including General Hiram Ulysses S. Grant, Major General Isaac Shelby, Private David Coon, Private Alanson Adams, and Private Alonzo Beckwith Coon, to name a few. To learn more about these and any of our other ancestors who served their countries, you can search in either of the search boxes in the sidebar for this site or for the Blythe Genealogy database site.

I have added a few photos and data to the Honor Wall at Fold3 and intend to add more. It will, however, take some time.
This site will be an amazing resource for educating future generations about the service and sacrifices of our military service personnel over the centuries.

The Fold3 Blog has more about the Honor Wall.


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Transcription: War of 1812 US Army Register of Enlistments; Adams

Transcription: War of 1812 US Army Register of Enlistments; Adams

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The following text is my transcription of the War of 1812 US Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914, listing some with the surname of Adams.

 

US Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914, Page 4, 'A's.
US Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914, Page 4.

51:  Adams, Abijah, Private

Organization:  30 US Infy; Captain Spencer; Col. Elias Fasset

Description:  5’10” or 5’9”; blue eyes; brown hair; dark complexion

Age: 28 or 20

Occupation:  Farmer

Birth Place:  Killington or Killingsly, Windham Co., Conn.

Enlistment Date:  Apl 4 1814

Enlistment Place:  Addison or Bridport, Addison Co., Virginia

Enlisted By:  Lt. Myrick

Enlistment Period:  War

Remarks:  D.R. Burlington, Vt. May 31st 1814, M.R. June 30/14, present, Capt. Wm Millers Co. Book 1813 to 1815. Present Dec. 1814 – D.R. Feby 16, JR Burlington, Feby 28, April 30 M.R. June-1815. Present – Certif. dated Plattsburgh, June 15 1815 – Book 555 – Discharged at Plattsburgh or Champlain Station, June 15 1815, term expiered. – See Pension Case.

52:  Adams, Abner, Recruit

Organization:  Recruit; US Arty

Description:  5’10”

Age:  21

Occupation:  ?

Birth Place:  Pepperell Mass, Middlesex Co.

Enlistment Date:  Jun 14 1814

Enlistment Place:  Groton Mass

Enlisted By:  Lt. Hobart

Remarks:  R.R. June  – 1814 –

53:  Adams, Abraham or Abram, Private

Organization:  5 US Regt

Description:  6’2”; blue eyes; dark hair;  fair complexion

Age:  22

Occupation:  Farmer or Carpenter

Birth Place:  Cheraw S.C. Dist

Enlistment Date:  Jul 8 1814

Enlistment Place:  Lancaster S.C.

Enlisted By:  Capt. R. Campbell

Enlistment Period:  5 years

Remarks:  R.R. July 30th 1814 – I.R. Capt. R. Campbell’s Co. Washington City, Feby 11/15, Absent at Bottom Bridge, Va – D.R. & I.R. Capt. Benj. Birdsall’s Co. Belle Fontaine, Dec. 30th 1815, I.R. Feby 29, April 30, June 30, Aug. 31, I.R. & S.A.M.R.. Dec. 31st 1817, & I.R. Feby 28 & April 30th. On command at Belle Fontaine – I.R. & S.A.M.R. Belle Fontaine, Mo. June 30th 1818, Present – sick in [gas] – I.R. Capt. J. McGunnigle’s Co. Aug. 31st 1818, Preseent – I.R. Oct. 31 & Dec. 31st 1818, On furlough – S.A.M.R. Capt. L. Gantt’s Co. Dec. 31st 1818, I.R. Feby 28 & April 20/19. On furlough – Mo. Ret. July 1819, Discharged, July 8th 1819. – Discharged at Franklin, Mo. [Ty], July 3/19, to take effect July 8/19, term expired – See Pension Case.

54:  Adams, Alanson, Private

Organization: 11th US Infy; Cols. Campbell, E.W. Ripley & Moody Bedel

Description:  5’11”;  blue eyes; brown hair; light complexion

Age:  21

Occupation:  Farmer

Birth Place:  Pittsfield Mass.

Enlistment Date:  Jany 28 1813

Enlistment Place:  Burlington Vt.

Enlisted By:  Capt. V.R. Goodrich

Enlistment Period:  Jany 27 1818

Remarks:  Capt. Sam’l Gordon’s Co Book 1813, Mustered in Co. from Lt. V.R. Goodrich’s Co. June 30/13 – M.R. Capt. V.R. Goodrich’s Co. Dec. 30th 1813, Feby 28 & S.A.M.R. June 30/14. Present – M.R. Aug. 30th 1814. In Gen’l Hosp’l, wounded July 25 or 26th 1814 – I.R. Capt. Jno. Bliss’ Co. Sackett’s Harbor, Nov. 1814, I.R. & M.R. Dec. 31st 1814, D.R. Feby 16, I.R. & M.R. Feby 28, & May 15th 1815. Joined Oct. 26th 1814, by consolidation & absent in Hosp’l at Williamsville or Greenbush – I.R. Lt. H. DeWitt’s Co. 6th U.S. Infy, Sackett’s Harbor, June – 1815. Dropped May 11th 1815 – Book 518 – Discharged at Greenbush, March 30th 1815, of wounds – wounded in right knee, at Bridgewater, July 25th 1814 – 11th U.S. Infy was made 6th after May 17th 1815.

54/2:  Adams, Alexander, Private

Organization:  24th US Infy

Enlistment Date:  July 28/12

Enlistment Period:  5 years

Remarks:  M.R. Dec. 31/13, Left sick at Buffalo, since Nov. 30/13 – Died sometime in Dec. 1813 – See Pension Case.

55:  Adams, Alex’r, Private

Organization:  26th US Infy; Capt. Swearingen

Enlistment Date:  July 13 1813

Enlistment Period:  1 year

Remarks:  S.A.M.R. Sackett’s Harbor, Dec. 31st 1813, Present – sick – S.A.M.R. Capt. Kinney’s Co. 25th Infy June 30/14, J’d Feby 28/14, Remarks:  from Capt. Swearingen’s Co. 26th Infy. Discharged June 20/14. Co. Book 1812 to 1814, Died Dec. [5]th 1812.

56:  Adams, Amajiah, Private

Organization: 9th US Infy; Capt. Chester Lyman

57:  Adams, Amos, Private

Organization:  [8th] US Infy; Col. P. Jack

Description:  5’11 ½”; black eyes; black hair; dark complexion

Age:  20

Occupation:  Farmer

Birth Place:  Briar Creek, S.C.

Enlistment Date:  Nov. 22 or 26 1813

Enlistment Place:  Georgia

Enlisted By:  Lt. Gresham

Enlistment Period:  Nov 2[0] 1818

Remarks:  M.R. Jany 31st 1814 Present – I.R. Capt. F.B. Warlay’s Co. Camp Huger, Ga. Nov. 30th 1814, Absent at Savannah sick since Oct. 25th 1814 – I.R. Camp Flournoy, Ga. Jany 10, D.R. Feby 16 & I.R. Camp Flournoy, Ga. Feby 28th 1815. Present – D.R. Lt. J.H. Mallory’s Co. 7th US. Infy Nov. 30th 1815, Present – I.R. & S.A.M.R. Capt. R.H. Bell’s Co., Ft. Hawkins, Ga. Dec. 31st 1815, I.R. Feby 29 & I.R. & S.A.M.R. June 30th 1816. Present – I.R. Capt. J.F. Corbaley’s Co. Ft. Crawford, Aug. 31. Oct. 31, I.R. & S.A.M.R. Dec. 31st 1816, I.R. Feby 28, April 30, I.R. & S.A.M.R. June 30, & I.R. Sept. 1st 1817. Present – I.R. Ft. Scott, Ga. Feby 28th 1818. On command – Orders dated Fort Gadsden, July 3rd 1818. Transferred from 5th to 3rd Co. – I.R. Capt. J. S. Allison’s Co. Ft St Marks, Aug. 31st 1818. Joined by transfer from 5th Co. & on command at Fort Gadsden – I.R. Ft Hawkins, [???] Oct. 31st 1818, Rect’g – I.R., S.A.M.R. & Mo. Ret. Ft St Marks, E. Fla. Dec. 31st 1818. Discharged, Nov. 21st 1818, term expired – 5th US Infy was made 4th after May 17th 1815. – Discharged from Capt Jno. R. Corbaley’s Co. at Fort Hawkins, Nov. 22nd 1818, term expired – See Pension Case.

58:  Addison, Allen B. or Alex B., Ensign

Organization:  [15th] US Infy; Col. Richard Dennis

Remarks:  Mo. Rets. Ft Johnson, SC, April 8, May & June 1814, at Fort Johnson, S.C. on duty, not properly attached to any company – I.R. Capt. Wm A. Remarks:  Blount’s Co. Ft Johnson, SC., Aug. 31, R.R. Sept, Oct 23, I.R. Oct. 31, R.R. & I.R. Dec. 31st 1814 & Roll Jany 22nd 1815. Joined from late Capt. Robeson’s Co. at Ft Johnson – Recruiting in S.C. since Aug. 21st 1814 – I.R. Ft Johnson, S.C. March 28th, & I.R. Capt. Wm Tisdale’s Co. May 1st 1815. Present – I.R. Capt. Wm O. Taylor’s Co. June 30th 1815, Discharged, June 30th 1815 – Borne as 3-Lieut. Aug. 31st 1814 & 2nd Lieut. from Sept. 1814.

59:  Aggus, Abner (Argus, Aggust), Private

Organization:  2nd US Infy; Capt. Robert Purdy

Enlistment Date:  Apl 22 1805

Enlisted By:  Capt. Hooks

Remarks:  Co. Book 1805 to 1807. Present at Pittsburgh, April, 25th 1805 – Capt. Jno. Campbell’s Co. Book. Joined Co. Sept. 24th Remarks:  1805. – Present at Fort Adams, Nov. 8th 1805 & April 24th 1806 – at Natchitoches, Oct. 16th 1806, at New Orleans, Dec. 2[0]th 1806 & April 2nd 1807 – Drummer – Deserted from Mississippi, June 7th 1807 – Tried by Ct Me at N. O. in Capt. Nicholas’ Co. 7th U.S. Infy May 27th 1813. Selling whiskey…

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine.

 

Report on the Operation by 27th (City of Winnipeg) Battalion, on the morning of September 15th 1916.

____________

28

Reference Sheets COURCELETTE and LE MOUQUET 1/5,000.

__________________________________________________

Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 1
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg 1.

The Battalion left the BRICKFIELDS at 2.00p.m. on 14th Sept. and proceeded to Brigade Headquarters at X.ii.a.2.2. arriving there at 5.00p.m. Two platoons of D Coy. relieved the right Company of the 29th Battn. in front line by 6.30.p.m. The Battn. left Brigade H.Q. at 9.00p.m. and proceeded to the front line to take up position in Assembly Trenches. Owing to congestion of trenches this was not completed till 4.25a.m. The Battn. frontage extended from R.35.c.2.9 1/2 to R.35.c.6.5. Battn.H.Q. were located at R.35.c.4.3. At 6.20a.m. the artillery barrage opened, 50 yards in advance of German trench and the first wave commenced crawling over. As the barrage lifted the Battn. advanced on to the  first German Line and reached the trench, the Germans threw up their hands and surrendered. At least 70 dead Germans were counted in this trench This objective was reported to Battn.H.Q. as being taken at 6.27a.m. The Battn. followed up the barrage closely andmet very little opposition at SUNKEN ROAD, Germans surrendering in large numbers. By this time the first wave was nearly wiped out and the second wave took its place. A Company then swung to the left and captured its last objective with one Corpl. and 15 O.R. C and D Coys. reached their objectives and immediately commenced to dig in. This was reported to Battn. H.Q. at 7.40a.m. The line held ran from R.35.b.5. ? 1/2 on SUNKEN ROAD, through R.30.c.0.2. to R.30.c.5.2. Garrison holding this line consisted of 120 all ranks and 4 Lewis Guns located in advance posts at R.30.c.0.2 – 1.2. – 3.2. – 5.3. Owing to casualties the following reinforcements were sent up from B Coy.: – 1 platton to A Coy. on the left and 2 platoons to D Coy. on the right. 4 Officers only were left. Lieuts. McElligott, Holdsworth, Hamilton and Terndrup. Lieut Holdsworth showed great courage and devotion to duty until killed by an enemy sniper. Lieut. Hamilton n the left flank carried on under most trying conditions even after being buried by shells. He was eventually severely wounded on the afternoon of the 16th inst. Enemy attempted to advance up SUNKEN ROAD but were driven off by our Lewis Gun fire. A large number also advanced into a field South West of COURCELETTE and commenced sniping our frontage from this flank. Our Colt and Lewis Guns dealt with the satisfactorily. Two patrols of 1 Lewis gun and 30 men each from the 31st Battn. pushed on towards COURCELETTE but were forced to return to our line owing to the barrage fire. At 11.25p.m. 15th Sept. Lieut. McElligott took command of the whole of our frontage of 3 Coys. and showed great courage and ability in the organizing and consolidation work. The enemy artillery fire was very intense for 48 hours on our front line.
Colt Machine Guns.
Colt machine guns followed behind the third wave and took up positions as follows :-
No. 1 gun at R.30.c.5.1.
No. 2 gun at protecting gap at R.29.d.10.? 1.2.
No. 3 gun at R.35.b.6.7. This gun did excellent work on small parties of Huns who persisted in creeping up towards our new front line.
No. 4 gun was located on a knoll in rear of SUNKEN ROAD and covered our left frontage. When No. 2 gun had established themselves Sergt. F.W.Haines pointed out a German machine gun and crew with a number of snipers dug in in a shell hole 200 yards away. Pte. Stewart opened up with a belt knocking out a number of the party. Sgt.Haines, Corpl. Hancock and Pte.Stewart dashed forward under cover of our machine guns and captured a new model German Maxim. Germans to the number of 6 Officers and 16O.R. surrendered. Sergt.Haines, waving his revolver, motioned them to evacuate in pairs. They filed out and were marched to the  Field Ambulance party near by where they were used as stretcher bearers. The enemy hadthrown away the feed block of the captured gun but after considerable careful searching this was located in a shell hole. The gun was then mounted and turned on enemy snipers, causing considerable casualties.

2.

29

Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 2
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg. 2.

Communication. Our Signallers advanced behind the fourth wave and ran three separate lines to the final objective. These were joined up laterally in the front line, SUNKEN ROAD and the German front line. Communication, however, could not be kept as all the wires were broken by shell fire.
Battalion Scouts were utilized in the following manner :-
Two Scouts each to the following tasks :-
1. The taking of the German front line.
2. The taking of SUNKEN ROAD.
3. The taking of the left Coy.objective.
4. The taking and sonsolidation of the final objective by all Coys. All these Scouts reported successfully yo Battn.H.Q. on the completion of their observation.
Runners were employed continuously and although 75 per cent became casualties, a good number of messages were got through.
Visual Signalling was attempted with flags and flappers but this drew the enemy’s fire and could not be carried on.
Carrying Parties. During the first 24 hours, owing to the intense barrage it was only possible to get through very limited supplies. Coys. and Sections were instructed to collect water, ammunition, bombs and rations from the dead. Our stretcher bearers worked unceasingly carrying out the wounded. The following day, 16th Sept., 7 parties were organized and succeeded in getting through to the front line with tea, mulligan, rations, water, ammunition and bombs. These parties, under Lieut.Coombes and Reg.Sgt.-Mjr.Underwood also succeededin evacuating the wounded, burying the dead and cleared up the battle field. A salvage dump was established at SUNKEN ROAD. A good supply dump was also established in the old German front line. Great credit is due to Reg.S.M. Underwood for the success of this work.
The Battn. evacuated the trenches at 2.00a.m. 17th Sept. 1916 and proceeded to Brigade Reserve (5th Cdn.Inf.Bde.) at X.ii.a.2.2.
Our casualties amounted to Killed 5 officers,   67   O.R. –
Wounded 7  do. 243   do.
Missing     1  do.   71   do.
Total All Ranks 394.
At 8.00p.m. 17th Sept. 1916 the Battn. was relieved by the 1st Cdn.Battn. and proceeded to bivouacs at the BRICKFIELDS near ALBERT.
Prisoners captured by the Battalion amounted to 200.

[Signature of Officer Here]
Lieut. Col.
Commanding 27th (C.of W.)Battn.
6th Inf.Bde., 2nd Canadian Div.

19.9.16

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.



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Alanson and Gardner Adams, Brothers in Arms in the War of 1812

Alanson and Gardner Adams, Brothers in Arms in the War of 1812

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I mentioned in a previous post about William B. Coon, who served as a soldier for the United States in the War of 1812 and was the father of Civil War casualty David Coon, that I would be writing about Alanson Adams (fifth great grandfather to my kids) who was father to David Coon’s first wife Mary Ann Adams.

 

Alanson and Gardner Adams both fought in the War of 1812.

 

Alanson Adams
Alanson Adams

Alanson was born April 16, 1792 to Joseph Adams (born 1756) in Williston, Vermont, United States and was the brother of Gardner Adams.

Alanson and Gardner Adams - Muster Roll
Alanson and Gardner Adams – War of 1812 Muster Roll.

Alanson worked as a farmer until he enlisted along with his brother Gardner on January 28, 1813 for service as soldiers for the United States in the War of 1812, both as Privates with Captain Samuel R. Gordon and Captain (later Lieutenant) Valentine R. Goodrich’s Company of the 11th Infantry Regiment in Vermont.

On February 28, 1814, Alanson’s brother Gardner was recorded to be sick in hospital at Brownsville. He had been shot in the leg, and as a result of this injury, he received a military pension after his discharge on January 28, 1818, just one day following the discharge of his brother Alanson.

Submit Hall
Submit (Mitty) Hall

Alanson married Submit “Mitty or Malinda” Hall in 1840 and they had the following children: Elam Dennis Adams (1821-1897), Martha Marie Adams (1827-1861) and Mary Ann Adams (1824-1859), first wife of Civil War veteran David Coon (fourth great grandfather to my kids). Throughout his life, he worked as a farmer (early years), labourer in manufacturing and as a shoemaker.

Sometime between 1840 and 1844, Alanson and his family relocated to Licking County, Ohio, living there until after 1860, when they are recorded in the census at Fold du Lac, Wisconsin, where he is shown living near his son Elam Dennis Adams.

The wealth of Alanson and his family appears to have fluctuated considerably. In 1850, he owned $600 value in real estate, yet in 1860 his wealth had reduced to just $100 in personal goods (no real estate), and then in 1870 he owned $1,000 in real estate. It is unknown whether Alanson had any personal wealth in 1880 as he is showing in the Canadian census to be living with the family of his son Elam Dennis Adams, while still in Fold du Lac, Wisconsin.

Alanson and his family were members of the Baptist Church.

Alanson died April 23, 1881 while living in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The following obituary was published in the Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth of Tuesday, April 26, 1881, on page 4.

 

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest. Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history. We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man. During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent. A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time. Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations. Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers. Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor. In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812. He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane. At the latter place he was wounded. Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country. He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress. To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day. By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history. Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State. In 1818 he was married. The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years. In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio. Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided. Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years. He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best. The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

Sources:

  1. Payroll of a Company of Infantry Commanded by Lt. Valentine R. Goodrich, the Eleventh Regiment of the United States, for the Months of January and February, 1813, online [], accessed.
  2. Emily Bailey, “Mary Ann Adams,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  3. Coon, David, death certificate no. Widow’s Claim to Pension – Emma and Hiram Coon (1864).
  4. Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams (31 Mar 1869).
  5. Adams, Alanson obituary, Fond du Lac Commonwealth, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Tuesday, April 26, 1881, Pg. 4.
  6. 1840 US Census, , (Burlington, Chittenden, Vermont); 541, Roll: 48; Page: 541; Image: 101, Family History Library Film: 0027439, 48, Original data: Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. (NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29, National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  7. 1870 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); Page: 285B, Roll: M593_1713; Page: 285B; Image: 577, Family History Library Film: 553212, Roll: M593_1713, Image: 577, National Archives and Records Administration, n.d., Washington, D.C..
  8. 1880 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); 212A, Roll: 1425; Page: 212A; Enumeration District: 41, Family History Film: 1255425, 1425, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, USA, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  9. 1800 US Census, , (Williston, Chittenden, Vermont, USA); 350, Roll: 51; Page: 350; Image: 195, Family History Library Film: 218688, 51, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  10. Adjutant-General, “Adjutant-General’s Report,” jpg, Roll of Capt. V. R. Goodrich’s Company (: accessed ).
  11. “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 26, 2014

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 26, 2014

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Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions.
FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

The list is extensive and will break into multiple pages as June 18th seems to have been a very busy, productive day at FamilySearch.org.

The countries with the most additions are Italy, Netherlands, Brazil, United States and Poland.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

Belgium

Bolivia

Brazil

Canada

Chile

China

Croatia

Czechoslovakia

Denmark

El Salvador

Germany

Honduras

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Italy

Mexico

Netherlands

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Russia

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Ukraine

United Kingdom

  1. England, Kent, Manorial Documents, 1241-1976
  2. England, Norfolk, Parish Registers (County Record Office), 1510-1997
  3. England, Norfolk Register of Electors, 1844-1952
  4. Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598-2009
  5. United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914-1920

United States

Venezuela

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Canada

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


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Genealogy News Bites to 12 Jun 2014

Genealogy News Bites to 12 Jun 2014

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Following are the current genealogy news bites and headlines up to June 12, 2014.
Genealogy News Bites
Genealogy News Bites and Headlines

Ancestry.com Blog

Comments on Y-DNA and mtDNA Tests

As many of you know, we announced last week that we’re retiring our Y-DNA and mtDNA tests. Unfortunately, we didn’t explain clearly our rationale for our decision, which has led to confusion. We’d like to take this opportunity to share the thinking that went into our decision making process.

Ancestry.co.uk Blog

Does This Make Angelina Jolie Kate Middleton’s Fairy Godmother?

While anxiously waiting for the release of the movie Maleficent (a “Sleeping Beauty” origin story about the malevolent fairy, in case you haven’t heard), film buffs Ancestry.ca have discovered that Elle Fanning has more in common with the character she portrays, Princess Aurora, than she may have thought. Fanning is actually the 22nd great-granddaughter of King Edward III, making her a long-lost princess. Her connection to King Edward III, who ruled from 1327-1377, makes Fanning of royal blood, a princess both on and off the big screen.

Library and Archives Canada

Newly Digitized Microfilms on the Héritage Portal

The following is a list of digitized microfilms that have been recently added to the Héritage website. Please note that the titles have been translated for convenience, the records are still in the language of origin. Searching in the original language will improve search results.

Library and Archives Canada releases an updated version of the Immigrants from China database

Last month was Asian Heritage Month, and the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) updated their database to include references to the C.I.9 certificates issued to people of Chinese origin born in Canada and wanting to leave Canada for a limited time without losing their Canadian status.

Find colour photos of Canadian Second World War soldiers

Did you know that Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has rare colour photographs from the Second World War? During that time period, colour film was a new and untested medium for most professional photographers. These images were captured on Kodak Kodachrome film by members of the Canadian Film and Photo Unit (CFPU) in the days and weeks following D-Day, on June 6, 1944.

UCSF News Services

Mexican Genetics Study Reveals Huge Variation in Ancestry

The genetic diversity of Mexican populations is reflected in the composition of chromosomes of mixed ancestry throughout Mexico. Three major Native American components are distributed across northern, central/southern, and southeastern regions of the …

NARAtions

Have Your Say: Revising the Digitization Strategy

In September 2007, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requested public input on a Draft Plan for Digitizing Archival Materials. Incorporating feedback from the public, NARA issued the Strategy for Digitizing Archival Materials for Public Access, 2007-2016 in May 2008. The strategy has served NARA well: the online catalog has over 2 million digital objects, the public has access to over 235 million images, and there were over 1.2 billion views of NARA content on Wikipedia in FY13.

The National Archives

Disturbing the ground: a Normandy landing

The plan of attack was to hit the long distance footpath, the GR 223, before lunch. If we could get out of Caen, the map promised us a glorious walk through the Normandy countryside. Even archivists sometimes have the need to shake the dust from their cardigans and get away from history. So much so, that I felt the ancient abbey marked in a field (doubtless a ruin) was not going to be worth a detour…

Sacramento Bee

Pa. county to create ancestry record search engine

The slowly fading pages kept at the Bucks County Courthouse chronicle one final act of charity by a Catholic saint and the 15-percent inheritance tax collected by the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The last will and testament of St…

Olive Tree Genealogy

Honouring WW1 Soldiers – a New Website

A few of my remembered soldiers In January Olive Tree Genealogy was pleased to be asked to help beta test a new website Lives of the First World War. Lives of the First World War is one of the Imperial War Museum’s major centenary projects, which looks to uncover the life stories of the men and women who served Britain and the Commonwealth during the First World War…

Births of Children of slaves, 1804-1835 in New Jersey

An interesting database came online recently on the New Jersey State Archives website. It’s called Births of Children of slaves, 1804-1835  in New Jersey According to the website The records in this series are the direct result of “An act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery” passed by the New Jersey Legislature…

Who Do You Think You Are? Returns!

The fifth season of the American version of Who Do You Think You Are? begins July 23 on TLC  For those who aren’t familiar with Who Do You Think You Are? it is a genealogy show produced by Lisa Kudrow and Dan Bucatinsky. The new season, which will also feature new journeys with Valerie Bertinelli, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Kelsey Grammer, Cynthia Nixon, Rachel McAdams and her sister  Kayleen…

Geneapress

The Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy to Hold …

Dallas, Texas – June 12, 2014 – The Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG) announced today that the fourth annual Forensic Genealogy Institute (FGI) will be held March 26-28, 2015, at the Wyndham …

ABC News

Smithsonian explores ancestry of Shriver family in DC

Smithsonian explores ancestry of Shriver family in D.C.. By The Associated Press. June 11, 2014 – 05:51 am. Email; Print. Decrease Increase Text size. WASHINGTON (AP) – Anthropologists from the Smithsonian have been analyzing the remains of 16 …

Slate Magazine Blog

One of New York’s Most Legendary Catholic Figures Was Also Jewish

A New York Times feature on new research into the geneaology of Cardinal John O’Connor, the New York City archbishop who died in 2000, makes the case that the influential Catholic figure’s mother was born Jewish—which, according to one tradition by …

Newswise

Deeper Than ancestry.com, ‘EvoCor’ Searches for Gene Relationships

Our bodies are as vast as oceans and space, composed of a dizzying number of different types of cells. Exploration reaches far, yet the genes that make each cell and tissue unique have remained largely obscure. That’s changing…

photo credit: Spanish Flea via photopin cc


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UK National Archives treasures: WWI war diaries now online.

UK National Archives treasures: WWI war diaries now online.

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One site I always make sure to return to is the UK National Archives site. This time, I’m returning to check out the third batch of 724 WWI war diaries from France and Flanders available at their First World War 100 portal.

WWI war diaries from the front.
WWI war diaries from the front.

It’s on this site I’ve found some of the oldest and most intriguing finds of my genealogy research, including the fifteenth century wills of Ann Stone, Hannah Stone and Robert Stone of Wyke Regis, Dorset. These are not just the transcriptions we’ve become used to finding, but are high quality scans of the original wills. Luckily, I’ve had some experience transcribing ‘ye olde Englishe’, so I was able to transcribe them for this site.

The war diaries recently made available provide a glimpse into the daily lives and circumstances of those who took part in the hostilities, especially at the front.

Some highlights from the war diaries now available are:

  • a sports day programme dated 31 October 1917, which notes pillow fighting, wheelbarrow races and wrestling on mules (WO 95/2524/3),
  • two photos giving a ‘how to’ and ‘how not to’ guide to laying trench boards (WO 95/2670/1),
  • three photos of battalion officers from 7th Battalion Black Watch Fife (one of these photos is shown above) (WO 95/2879/5), and
  • sketch of a ‘snapshot’ view from the front (which notes ‘dead animals’ and even a ‘dead Frenchman’) (WO 95/2970/3).

Are you interested in playing a role in digitizing, tagging, and capturing data from WWI war diaries?

To participate and contribute, go to the Operation War Diary website.

It is highly recommended that a modern browser be used since www.operationwardiary.org uses advanced browser features and is designed to be used on a PC with IE version 9 (or higher), or with latest versions of Firefox, Chrome, and Safari on a Mac.

photo credit: Hampshire and Solent Museums via photopin cc


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I wait with bated breath for the completion of two amazing new digitization projects by Library and Archives Canada.

I wait with bated breath for the completion of two amazing new digitization projects by Library and Archives Canada.

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WWI Soldier in serviceWWI Expeditionary Force personnel and service records.

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has announced they will be digitizing 640,000 service and personnel records of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).After being housed at LAC, these files are the most heavily consulted collection and the amount of research being conducted through the use of the paper documents and LAC is anxious to digitize them to preserve the originals for future generations.

Unfortunately, this project will require closure of portions of the collection, starting with letters A through D being closed March 2014 and expected to be available digitally online sometime in the summer. LAC will be unable to provide personal consultation and copying services from the closed collections.

This collection in particular is of interest to me because of my research into our two family members who were killed in WWI: Philias Joseph Albert Emery, who was missing and assumed killed during the preparations at Vimy Ridge; and Joseph Turmaine, who was missing in action and assumed dead at the battle of Courcelette.

The project is expected to be complete sometime in 2015.

LAC requests that interested parties consult the Fact Sheet: Digitization of Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files.

Upper Canada governmentDigitization and indexing of millions of government administrative and personal documents.

This digitization project is expected to triple the digitized content LAC already has available online for free.

New content being added to the Héritage website will include, in part: Civil Secretary’s letter books of Upper Canada; despatches from the Colonial Office; general index to the Public Archives of Canada; Heir and Devisee Commission; Lower Canada, declarations of aliens; port records; and Upper Canada land books and sundries.

photo credit: Toronto Public Library Special Collections via photopin cc
photo credit: BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives via photopin cc


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Ancestry.ca offers free access to military records for Canadians

Ancestry.ca offers free access to military records for Canadians

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Canadian army soldier's notebookFree access to military records for Canadians on Ancestry.ca is a definite opportunity not to be missed.

For the period of November 7 to 12, 2013, the numerous (over 4.4 million) military records available include:

  • Military Honours and Award Citation Cards, 1900-1961.
  • Nominal Rolls and Paylists for the Volunteer Militia, 1857-1922.
  • Canada, War Graves Registers: Circumstances of Casualty, 1914-1948
  • CEF Commonwealth War Graves Registers, 1914-1919
To trace possible military heroes in your family, visit www.ancestry.ca/honouryourheros.

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