Tag: Scotland

British Ancestry: a mixture of genetic DNA from other populations.

British Ancestry: a mixture of genetic DNA from other populations.

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Genetic signatures have been found among Britons that strongly illustrate their historical roots from various locations of the UK, resulting in a highly detailed and descriptive map of genetic variations. The analysis shows clusters of genetic variation within the late 1800s, when the population was less migratory, and reflects historical waves of migration by a variety of groups of people into the island.

 

According to Peter Donnelly, the Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in Oxford, England, “The patterns we see are extraordinary. “The genetic effects we’re looking at are the result of, probably, thousands of years of history.”

DNA Map of UK migration.
Each symbol represents an individual at the center of their grandparents’ birthplaces. The tree (top right) DNA map of UK migration shows how the clusters are related. Photo credit: University of Oxford

Today, few Britons have ancestors from only one region of the United Kingdom. Therefore, it’s difficult to find patterns of genetic variation originating from a specific place.

However, the team found Britons that lived in rural areas and knew that their grandparents were all born within less than eighty kilometers. Since the DNA of these people was a blend of their grandparents’ DNA, it was expected that their genetic variations would be from within the geographic regions of their grandparents.

Participants were lumped into groups based specifically on their genetic DNA, and the geography of these groups matched significantly. Those from across central and southern Britain were in the most important cluster. Several groupings within this main group were much more isolated.

Those whose ancestry can be traced back to the archipelago, off the northeast coast of Scotland, fell into three distinct classes. This isolation most likely was a result of the islands creating difficulties in movement among various populations.

As well as the influence of geographic barriers, the overall picture resulted from migrations into and around the UK.

Genomes of people from continental Europe were analysed to gain insight into the scope of their ancestors’ contributions to Britons’ genetic ancestry. The flow of Anglo-Saxons from contemporary Germany into the UK after the departure of the Romans in 410 AD was indicated. Rather than displacing the resident population, they interbred.

Surprisingly, the Vikings, who occupied the UK during the four centuries from 700 AD to 1100 AD, had very little influence on the genetic makeup of Britons.

Britons or those with British heritage may conceivably use their DNA to trace the homelands of their ancestors.

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Sources:

Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.

Callaway, Ewan; UK Mapped out by genetic ancestry; http://www.nature.com/news/uk-mapped-out-by-genetic-ancestry-1.17136


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Genealogy Database

Genealogy Database

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Athelwulf, King of Wessex
Athelwulf, King of Wessex

Our Blythe Genealogy Database

After extensive work, my genealogy database is now updated and links can be found in the upper menu or in the left sidebar. There are thousands of surnames and the extensive lineages include Welsh Quaker immigrants to the USA, French Canadian, Acadian, American pioneers, Canadian pioneers, French, British, Welsh, German, Scandinavian and medieval and royal genealogies.

The database includes extensive facts, sources and some images.


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The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

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The UK National Archives  has a free online search, but there are problems. Some knowledge has always been necessary to search the catalogue with any success.

The Discovery Service makes it easier for everyone – novice to expert – to search and use the collection.

The user is able to search the collection, explore and browse, whether for genealogy research and/or scholastic purposes.

Discovery is a digitized document delivery service that will make it easier to search for genealogy records such as wills and testaments, court proceeding transcription and order digitized genealogy records.

To experience Discovery, visit the Labs section of the National Archives website, the place they release new online services for customers for testing and to provide feedback. New features are being added to Discovery regularly and the latest release includes advanced search and fixes existing problems in previous versions.

The Discovery service will be fully tested and approved before it replaces any other services.

The National Archives holds over 22 million historical government and public records, doubling in just over two years and making it one of the largest archive collections in the world. From Domesday Book to modern government papers and digital files, the collection includes paper and parchment, electronic records and websites, photographs, posters, maps, drawings and paintings.

The old catalogue offered a free search of the collection, but had its problems. A minimum knowledge level was necessary to be able to effectively search the collection. This required level of knowledge made it difficult for new users to take advantage of the search.

The National Archives Discovery Service implemented a system that makes it easier for users of all levels.


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Records and Documents from the Past Paint a Picture

Records and Documents from the Past Paint a Picture

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Edward VII at Balmoral Castle

I’m a visual thinker.

Every record I find provides information that helps to inform of the living conditions, financial circumstances,  physical health and social times of the people concerned. The more informative the record is, the more vivid is the picture it paints in my mind.

The best example of this I’ve ever seen are the Valuation Rolls of Scotland. I discovered them on ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk.

The one for Balmoral Estate was particularly interesting. I always thought of the estate as just a castle and its grounds but there was much more to it.

According to the 1915 Valuation Rolls, not only was the estate home to the royal family, but to the families of servants, merchants, farmers, gardeners, tradesmen, police officers and a doctor with responsibilities at the estate. To house all of these people and their families, the estate consisted of at least 38 houses and cottages. There were also other amenities present including stables, woodlands, gardens, a deer forest and grazing, a dairy farm, golf course, curling club, sanatorium (if you can call this an ‘amenity’), and there must have been telephone service, or at least plans to install it, as ‘telephone wire’ is listed.

It appears to have operated as its own little ‘town’. The only thing missing on the Rolls is the ‘mayor’ and council, and what town would need them with the royal family present?


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

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The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Feature image: Map of the kingdom of Prussia in the 18th century.

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Argentina

Australia

Canada

Chile

Croatia

Czechoslovakia

Denmark

Honduras

Hungary

Netherlands

Philippines

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Australia

Germany

Guam

Mexico

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

 


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The starvation of the Lady of Hay.

The starvation of the Lady of Hay.

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The story behind the starvation of the Lady of Hay.

 

William de Briouse, starvation of the Lady of Hay
William de Briouse, starvation of the Lady of Hay

William de Briouse III (25th great grandfather to my children, Erin and Stuart) was the son of William de Briouse II, Lord of Abergavenny (as well as Briouse, Bramber, Brecon and Over-Gwent) and his wife Berthe of Hereford.

He is believed to have been born about 1155 and he died August 9, 1211 and was buried August 10, 1211 in Paris. He married Maud (Mathilde) de Saint-Valéry, Dame de la Haie of the famed tale of the starvation of the Lady of Hay, (…and 25th great grandmother to Erin and Stuart), about 1170 or 1175. Maud de Saint-Valéry was the daughter of Bernard III, de Saint-Valéry and his wife Anora (Avoris).

William III and Maud had ten children: Marguerite de Briouse (1175-1255); Laurette de Briouse (1184-?); Eleanor (?-1241); William “the Younger” IV, de Briouse (1185-1210); Philip de Briouse; Matilda de Briouse; unknown; unknown; Reynold de Briouse, Lord of Abergavenny (1178-1227); and Isobel de Briouse (1184-?).

Hay Castle, starvation of the Lady of Hay
Hay Castle, location of the starvation of the Lady of Hay and her son, William IV de Briouse.

William III was descended from William de Braose, Lord of Braose, who had received great estates at the time of the conquest in England and had settled at Bramber. William III had also inherited lands in one of either Totnes or Barnstaple through his grandmother, and had also inherited great Welsh estates of his grandfather, Bernard de Neufmarche through his mother, Bertha, including that of Hay Castle in Wales (see right).

During the reign of Richard III, William III was Sheriff of Herefordshire between 1192 and 1199 and a Justice Itinerant for Staffordshire in 1196. Having been with Richard in Normandy in 1195, he received both Totnes and Barnstaple by agreement with his original co-heir.

Upon the accession and coronation of King John (24th great grandfather to Erin and Stuart), and having achieved a place in the King’s favour, he accompanied King John to Normandy in 1200, and was granted all lands he conquered from the Welsh. he was also made Sheriff of Herefordshire between 1206 and 1207. Other lands William III had acquired through various means during these years included Limerick (without the city), custody of Glamorgan Castle, Gowerland, Grosmont, Llantilio (or White Castle), and Skenfrith Castles. , but shortly after he began to fall from favour, although the reasons for this have never been clear.

From records in the Red Book of the Exchequer, it would appear that it was a quarrel about repayment of his agreed debts. The evidence shows that in 1207, he had only paid 700 marks in total, a small portion of what should have been paid based on the agreed 500 marks per year. After being five years in arrears, the crown had the right to seize his estates. It was learned that he had removed the stock, and the king’s bailiff then acted under orders to seize him.

William III’s friends having acted on his behalf, they met with the King and William was permitted to come to the King at Hereford to surrender his castles of Hay, Brecknock, and Radnor in repayment of his arrears. William III, however, failed to make any further repayment of the debt and the King sent his men to demand hostages of William, but supposedly against William’s advice, Maud refused them. Having reached a point of no return, William attempted to seize control of his castles. However, he failed at this and subsequently attacked Leominster. As the royal forces approached, he and his family fled to Ireland and his estates were seized by the King.

William III was harboured in Ireland by friends who promised to surrender him within a certain time. However, they only sent William III when John’s invasion of Ireland became imminent. William III proceeded no further than Wales, however, where he later offered 40,000 marks in return for his lands. William’s wife, Maud, was besieged by John in Ireland and fled to Scotland, where she, her son William and his wife were captured in Galloway and escorted to John at Carrickfergus. Using Maud as leverage, John bargained for repayment of the 40,000 marks. Yet again, however, payment was not forthcoming and William III was outlawed, resulting in his fleeing in disguise to France, where he died.

His wife, Maud, who was largely blamed for his downfall, was imprisoned with her eldest son William IV by John in Corfe Castle (see above) and they were both starved to death there.

The second son, the Philip de Briouse, Bishop of Hereford, returned to England on July 16, 1214, and paid a 9,000 mark fine for his father’s lands. As this son died very soon after, John allowed the lands to then pass to the third son Reynold de Briouse on May 26, 1216, who also, under Henry III, recovered the Irish estates.

Sources:

  • Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands./NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#BernardIISaintValeryA.
  • Dictionary of National Biography, Vols. 1-21; George Smith; Oxford Press, (1885-1990).
  • The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant; G.E. Cokayne with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I).
  • The Magna Carta Sureties; 1215; Weis, Frederick Lewis, Th.D. (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.), 5th Ed., c 1999.
  • A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire; Sir Bernard Burke (1883).

photo credit: creative commons license; wikipedia.org


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Medieval Genealogy Research: Myth vs. Fact

Medieval Genealogy Research: Myth vs. Fact

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I have found my many years of our family genealogy research to be both difficult and rewarding; especially medieval research when one has to distinguish between myth and fact. There is no feeling like breaking down a ‘brick wall’ and finding solid support and/or primary genealogy sources to document the finds.

 

There are a few sites for ancestry research that I consider to be ‘gold standard’. I have itemized these global and Canadian sites in my previous post ‘O Canada!‘ and on the site’s ‘Genealogy Links‘ pages.

Research into my husband’s royal and Welsh Quaker family history has been consistently rewarding and I was able to find sources without a great deal of difficulty – until I reached the medieval period. I spent a great amount of time searching for reliable and respected sites and usually had to resort to entering unsupported data until I could locate sources for verification.

The truth of the matter is that medieval genealogy research incorporates fact and myth and it can be very difficult to verify information as few primary sources are available.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy LogoThe one site I have found and rely upon the most is that of the ‘Foundation for Medieval Genealogy‘, a non-profit organization consisting of British genealogists and historians with a special interest in the medieval period. They seek to educate in, promote research in and publish results from the study of medieval genealogy.

It is possible to search for specific individuals. However, one thing I have learned is that name spellings can vary greatly. When researching one individual, I will usually search for them first and then close family members second. Once a family member is identified, it’s a simple matter of comparing the data of the others to identify duplicates for merge.

To access the digital collections, it is necessary to register. I have never registered, but I have been able to obtain information by using their open genealogical database that does not require registration.

Those responsible for this database have made every effort to cite the best possible sources in support of their conclusions and deductions. I especially like and respect the fact that they make it clear when information is speculative and provide detailed explanations of their conclusions. Any information that is speculative or unsupported is contained within square brackets (i.e. ‘[ ]’). Facts supported by sources are signified by numerical links to the source citation.

I consider this site to be the best source for medieval genealogy research and would not hesitate to recommend it for such.


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 5 Dec 2014.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 5 Dec 2014.

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Following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 5 Dec 2014.

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 5 Dec 2014″ src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/origin_3786077432.jpg” alt=”FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 5 Dec 2014″ width=”424″ height=”319″ /> FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 5 Dec 2014
FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Barbados

Canada

Puerto Rico

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Canada

Czechoslovakia

United Kingdom

United States


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

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Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Coons-and-Pettibones-436×600.jpg” alt=”Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.” width=”238″ height=”327″ /> FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Indonesia

Italy

New Zealand

Slovakia

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Bermuda

Canada

Hungary

Netherlands

United Kingdom

United States


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 26, 2014

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 26, 2014

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Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions.
FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

The list is extensive and will break into multiple pages as June 18th seems to have been a very busy, productive day at FamilySearch.org.

The countries with the most additions are Italy, Netherlands, Brazil, United States and Poland.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

Belgium

Bolivia

Brazil

Canada

Chile

China

Croatia

Czechoslovakia

Denmark

El Salvador

Germany

Honduras

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Italy

Mexico

Netherlands

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Russia

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Ukraine

United Kingdom

  1. England, Kent, Manorial Documents, 1241-1976
  2. England, Norfolk, Parish Registers (County Record Office), 1510-1997
  3. England, Norfolk Register of Electors, 1844-1952
  4. Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598-2009
  5. United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914-1920

United States

Venezuela

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Canada

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


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