Tag: Records

Transcription: Pennsylvania Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 – Beaven to Eyre

Transcription: Pennsylvania Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 – Beaven to Eyre

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The following is my transcription of the Pennsylvania Church and Town Records dated between 1708 and 1985, for surnames Beavan to Eyre (in alphabetical order).

 

Pennsylvania, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 - Aubrey Bevan - small
Pennsylvania Church and Town Records

CHESTER FRIENDS CEMETERY

On the west side of Edgmont Avenue between Sixth and Seventh Streets, Chester, Pa.

____________________

The image above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

 

PENNSYLVANIA CHURCH AND TOWN RECORDS

Beavan, Ann

Died February 18 1768 Aged

Grave No.

39

Beavan, Aubray

Died February 12 1761 Aged 56 years

“ “

40

Beavan, Jane

Died

“ “

52

Bond, Benjamin

Died June 27 1858 Aged 76 years

“ “

98

Bond, Margaret

Died February 28 185- Aged 72 years

“ “

99

Brobson, Rebecca

Born the 23rd of 10 month 1790

Died the 3rd of 5 month 1864

“ “

106

Brobson, William

12-18-1785; 12-30-1858

“ “

105

Burk, Emeline T.

Died

“ “

43

Byre, Abigail

Born Jun 6 1786 Died July 9 1858

“ “

115

Byre, Elizabeth

“ “

112

Byre, Jacob

Died August 20 1826

In the 83rd year of his age

“ “

111

Byre, Jacob

“ “

116

Cobourn, Tacey

11-6-1813; 11-14-1848

47

Chestnut, Lizzie L.

Daughter of John and Phoebe J. Chestnut

Born June 7 1861 Died January 10 1880

“ “

139

Chestnut, Mamie A. Lane

Daughter of John and Anna Chestnut

Died August 8 1860 Aged 15 months

“ “

137

Churchman, Sally B.

Wife of Jesse M. Eyre

Born September 20 1813 Died March 21 1846

“ “

51

Cowpland, Caleb Esq.

Who departed this life the 12th day of

the 10th month 1757 in the 67th year

of his age

“ “

16

Cowpland, Sarah

Wife of Caleb Cowpland Died

“ “

17

Davis, Carolina

Born September 21 1830 Died April 1 1852

“ “

128

Davis, Susanna

Born July 26 1837 Died March 20 1852

“ “

127

Dick, Thomas B. Esq.

Who departed this life April 21 A.D.1811

Aged 43 years 1 month

Draper, Richard H.

Born September 28 185- Died November 12

1851

“ “

135

Dyer, William

“ “

69

Engle, Joseph

Died October 8 1857 Aged 88 years

“ “

130

Engle, Susanna

Wife of Joseph Engle

Died July 15 1253 Aged 75 years

“ “

129

Eyre, Abigail

Died

“ “

63

Eyre, Arabella

Daughter of William & Susan Eyre

Died

“ “

48

Eyre, Elizabeth

Wife of Jonas P. Eyre

Born the 1st month 13 1813 Died

“ “

134

Eyre, Jane

Died

“ “

65

Eyre, Jonas P.

Born October 25 17- Died

“ “

132

Eyre, Joshua

Son of David W. and Mary P. Eyre

Died the 2nd Month 25 1856

Aged 9 months and 17 days

“ “

133

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Virginia Marriage Records, 1700 to 1850

Transcription: Virginia Marriage Records, 1700 to 1850

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Transcription of the Virginia Marriage Records, 1700 to 1850, pg 186.

Cocke; Virginia, Marriage Records, 1700-1850
Virginia marriages (click image for full size view.)

June 1, 1758. Thomas Lewis to Susanna Ellis, daughter of John Ellis; sec., Joseph Ellis; witn., Valentine Wood.
October 27, 1747. William Pryor to Sarah Wood; sec., Valentine Wood; witn., Henry Wood.
April 3, 1744. William Cannon, Jr., to Elizabeth Lewis; sec., John Lewis; witn., H. Wood; certificate of consent from Elizabeth’s father, Charles Lewis; witn., John Lewis and Robert Morgan [X].
April 19, 1742. James Cooke, Jr., to Mary Anne Chastain ; sec., Henry Wood; witn., Joseph Dabbs and Isaac Bates.
March 4, 1742. George Watwood to Mary Taylor; sec., James Robinson; witness, Henry Wood.
October 11, 1755. Thomas Riddle to Agnes Mims; sec., Wm. Robards; witn., Valentine Wood; certificate of consent from David Mims; witn., Hezekiah Pin-year and Drury Minis.
August 21, 1753. Abraham Sallée to Elizabeth Woodson; sec., John Woodson; witn., Anthony Christian, Alexander Grant.
July 1, 1742. Samuel Ridgeway to Mary Bellamy; sec., Charles Lewis; witn., H. Wood.
November 20, 1753. Joseph Dawson [X] to Judith Dudley; sec., James George; witn., David Murray.
April 28, 1753. Benjamin Bradshaw [X] to Anne McBride; sec., John McBride; witn., William Pryor; certificate of consent from John McBride; witn., Agnes Lane, Elizabeth McBride.
July 3, 1743. Edmund Gray to Mary Mayo; sec., Geo. Dabbs; witn., H. Wood; certificate of consent from William Mayo; witn., George Carrington, Joseph Scott.
January 17, 1736. John Williamson to Prudence Cox; sec., Charles Turnbull; witn., H. Wood.
December 19, 1733. Nicholas Davies to Judith Randolph; sec.,  Middleton Shaw; witn., H. Wood.
May 17, 1738. William Stith to Judith Randolph; sec., Nicholas Davies; witn., Will Randolph.
March 16, 1742. Hutchings Burton to —-———; sec., William Allen; witn., H. Wood.
December 8, 1734. Joseph Scott to Sarah Mayo; sec., John Barnit [X]; witn., H. Wood; certificate of consent from William Mayo, father of Sarah; witn., James Marye and William Allen.
November 20, 1751. Guy Smith to Anne Hopkins; sec., Will Pryor; witn., H. Wood. ‘ W
September 14, 1747. Thomas Massie to Susanna Holland; sec.,. Henry Martin; witn., H. Wood.

186

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: In Memoriam card for Obeline D. Roy.

Transcription: In Memoriam card for Obeline D. Roy.

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Following is my transcription of the In Memoriam card from the funeral of Obeline D. Roy.

In Memoriam for Obeline D. Roy.
In Memoriam for Obeline D. Roy.

 

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

OBELINE D. ROY

1906 – 1986

O gentlest heart of Jesus ever present in the Blessed Sacrament, ever consumed with burning love for the poor captive souls in Purgatory have mercy on the soul of Thy departed servant. Be not severe in Thy judgment but let some drops of Thy Precious Blood fall upon the devouring flames and do Thou O Merciful Savior send Thy angels to conduct Thy departed servant to a place of refreshment, light and peace. AMEN.

May the souls of all the faithful departed through the mercy of God, rest in peace. AMEN.

HEMS BROTHERS MORTUARY

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson), who died in Cairns, Australia. A memorial service was held in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Washington on August 27, 1995.

Carolyn Alma Hodgson ObituaryCarolyn Alma Hodgson

A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 27, 1995, in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Wash. Mrs. Hodgson died of a ruptured aorta Aug. 19 in Cairns, Australia, at age 52.

She was born March 14, 1943, in Becker County, Minn. Her maiden name was Johnson. She moved to the Northwest in 1957 and graduated from Central Washington State College. She married Donald L. Hodgson on June 18, 1966. They lived in Beaverton, and she taught at Oregon Episcopal School and worked for ‘Timberline Lodge.

They moved to Papua New Guinea in 1982.

Surviving are her husband; sons, Eric of Dallas, Texas, and Fernando of Gresham; daughters, Anaka of Bradleboro, Vt., and Leyla Bartruff of Troutdale; mother Esther Johnson of Battle Ground, Wash; sister, Alice Olsen of Battle Ground; brothers, Stanley Johnson of Arlington, Wash., and Arvid Johnson of Battle Ground; and four grandchildren.

Disposition by cremation.

Remembrances: Lae Hospital Save the Children Fund, in care of Bethel Lutheran Church, 12919 N.E. 159th, Brush Prairie, Wash. 98606.

________

The image of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

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Harold Everett Redetzke+ + + + OBITUARY – HAROLD EVERETT REDETZKE + + + +

May 18, 1935 – October 12, 2002

Harold Everett Redetzke, age 67, died on Saturday, October 12, 2002 at his home in rural Sebeka, MN. Harold was born to Elmer and Margaret (Kimball) Redetzke on May 18, 1935 in Butler Township, MN. Harold was united in marriage to Norma Eckert on June 8, 1957 in Sebeka, MN. They lived in Foxhome, MN for several years and then moved beck to Sebeka where Harold tanned until retirement. Harold served on the Red Eye Township Board for a few years and was a member of Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church. Harold underwent heart transplant surgery on September 27, 1987 at the University of Minnesota Hospital.

Redetzke, Harold Everett; MemorialHarold is survived by his wife Norma Redetzke of Sebeka, MN, to their union were born five children; two daughters, Diane Steinkraus and her husband Ronnie of Sebeka, MN, Debbie Redetzke of Lincoln, Nebraska; three sons, Myron Redetzke and his wife Pam of Sebeka, MN, Marvin Redetzke and his wife Lori of Sebeka, MN, Calvin Redetzke and his wife Joni of Sebeka, MN; seven grandchildren, Lacey Eckman and her husband Justin, Shawn Redetzke, Jeremy Redetzke. Levi Steinkraus, Evette Steinkraus, Reid Redetzke, and Logan Redetzke; five sisters, Delilah Hasbargen of Frazee, MN, LaVern Milbradt of Sebeka, MN, Donna Super and her husband George of Menahga, MN, Joyce Slininger and her husband Bill of St Cloud, MN, Darlene Hought and her husband Konnie of Foxhome, MN; two brothers, Marlyn Redetzke and his wife Joyce of Sebeka, MN, Donald Redetzke and his wife Roseann of Ely, MN; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, brother Gordon, infant sister Mavis and nephew Corey Hought.

[Handwritten: ‘Herbert Redetzke (Bro.)’]

Memorial Services were held on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 at 1:30 P.M. at Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church in Sebeka, MN with Reverend Mark Manning officiating. Organist was Hilda Mary Schoon and congregational hymns were “In the Garden,” “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Softly and Tenderly Jesus is Calling.” Honorary Pallbearers were Glen Kimball, Randy Redetzke, Daniel Besonen, Ryan Milbradt, Larry Huotari, Benny Olson and Gerald Olson. lnurnment will be at Green Hill Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Cardini — Behrens Funeral Homes of Sebeka and Menahga, MN.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Tombstone: Anna E. Blythe (nee Murray)

Tombstone: Anna E. Blythe (nee Murray)

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Tombstone of Anna E. Blythe
Tombstone of Anna E. Blythe
The following is a transcription of the tombstone of Anna E. Blythe. Anna died August 9, 1925 in Danville, Vermilion, Illinois, USA.

Anna E. Murray

wife of

Charles E. Blythe

1873 – 1925

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is available online.

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is available online.

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Previously, I wrote about the Incest Prevention App called ‘Sifjaspellsspillir’ or ‘Incest Spoiler’. It was created by University of Iceland students for a contest by the Íslendingabók database and its purpose is to alert two people of a possible familial connection when they tap their phones.

Later, in a related story, the “Icelandic Roots: Genealogy, Heritage, & Travel” website announced its release of the Icelandic genealogy database through their site.

The database is available with a monthly or yearly subscription. Access is also available to organizations and researchers by contacting them.

While continuing to add names and other great features, the database also links you to events, dates, occupations, cemetery records and burials, photos and more.

They will assist with your genealogy research by helping you find your family tree, connecting you with family members, and  providing ancestry charts and reports. All this is possible through their popular “Cousins Across the Ocean” project or you can complete their online request form for more information.

If you’re interested in finding out more, there are tips for using the database, and they also explain its history. If you have Icelandic research to do, this site and database are well worth checking out.


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Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles

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US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles.

U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 of Frank Niles
U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 of Frank Niles

 

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U1257
NAME: Frank John Niles
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: West Milton, Miami, Ohio
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: None

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 57; DATE OF BIRTH: June 18, 1885

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: West Milton, Ohio

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Bobbie Niles, West Milton, Ohio

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: Harry Sexhour, West Milton, O.

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS:   West Milton, Miami, Ohio
(Number and street or R. F. D. number)     (Town)     (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1                         16-21630-2      Frank Niles
(Revised 4-1-42)     (over)                                   (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

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The first consideration when starting to research your genealogy is creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

 

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.
The importance of creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.

I have been a computer user from the day of the old single-use word processors. Therefore, I tend to digitize everything into my own digital library of valuables from family photos, tax documents, bills, bank records, correspondence – and of course, genealogy records, genealogy databases and data.

I’m not a novice. I’m well aware of the pitfalls of relying on a digital library, but I’m as guilty as the next person for procrastination and rationalization.

When it comes to doing the tasks necessary to ensure my genealogy records are secure and permanent, I tend to think, “It’s OK, I’ll do it later.”

There are, however, some very serious pitfalls of putting these things off.

Some of the compelling reasons for digitizing records include:

  • Immediacy of sending genealogy records digitally over the internet.
  • Ease of organization, storage, searching and reproduction.
  • Ability to share family genealogy records between yourself and others.
  • Retain genealogy records in condition at the time of scanning to safeguard against the inevitable ravages of time on physical documents, etc.
  • More and more genealogy records are “born-digital”, never having been in physical form at all.

The digital backup we are used to is not sufficient to safeguard and archive records. The process required includes:

  • Storing with background, technical and descriptive information.
  • Storing records in several locations.
  • Archiving for a very lengthy period of time.
  • Saving genealogy data at a very high resolution.
  • Periodically backing up stored genealogy records to new media to prevent loss of data.
  • Converting file formats and media to new ones to avoid obsolescence.
  • Ensuring access to the digital genealogy records collection.

For my own digital archive storage, I am using a 1 terabyte hard drive and save all important genealogy documents and photos to it. If my sum total of research at this point wasn’t as large as it is, I would use the ‘cloud’ as a backup. But there are limits to the quantity of data it will hold.

All of my original genealogy files and data are on my computer.

I also transfer the files periodically to a new backup using the newest technology and format.

I don’t believe in using CDs, DVDs or even flash drives for permanent storage at all as I’ve had too many fail.

photo credit: Sean MacEntee via photopin cc


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Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

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Following is my transcription of the biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely from the Dictionary of National Biography.

Featured image: Replica of the first Fort Hall in Pocatello, Idaho.

Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography
Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography

DR. OSCAR B. STEELY.

 

Greater than the responsibility of almost any other line of human endeavor is that which rests upon the physician; the issues of life and death are in his hands, and the physician’s skill and power must be his own; not by gift, by purchase or influence can he acquire it. If he would retain relative precedence, it must come as the result of superior skill, knowledge and ability, and these qualifications are possessed in a marked degree by Dr. Oscar B. Steely, who is not only numbered among the representative physicians and surgeons of the state, recognition of this fact having been made by Governor McConnell in his “appointment as surgeon general of Idaho, but his executive ability, force of character and strong personal magnetism have caused his election and reelection to the responsible office of mayor of the progressive city of Pocatello, where he resides.

Doctor Steely was born in Belleville, Pa., on August 22, 1862, a son of William and

055

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography

Sarah (Baker) Steely, natives of Pennsylvania, to which commonwealth his early paternal German ancestors emigrated in the early Colonial days, as did the progenitors of his mother, who came from England at about the same period of time, and both his maternal and paternal great-grandfathers patriotically served in the long and bloody contest of the Revolutionary war.

Doctor Steely received his preliminary literary education in the public schools of his native place, thereafter continuing his studies in the Bloomsburg State Normal School and Literary Institute, from which he was graduated with a high standing, thereafter matriculating at the famous University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1883, in the meantime engaging in pedagogic work in Philadelphia, where he held the office of supervising principal of the public schools of the city for four years, thereafter entering Jefferson Medical College, where he completed the prescribed course, being graduated therefrom with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1891.

Thus thoroughly prepared and equipped for his profession, he served one year as surgeon in the Jefferson Hospital, and in 1892

056

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

located in Pocatello, Idaho, and entered at once upon a successful and far-reaching practice, being the ofiicial physician and surgeon of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, of which he is still in incumbency, and he has been very successful both as a physician and a surgeon. His private practice in both medicine and surgery is one of the largest in the state, controlling a large clientele of leading citizens, and manifesting a liberality and generosity in his treatment of the poor and unfortunate which have bound them to him as with hooks of steel. He stands high in medical circles, was a member of the Pennsylvania State Medical Association and the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, while his papers and articles on medical and surgical subjects take rank as authoritative, and his incumbency of the office of surgeon general was marked by a careful, conservative, but at the same time progressive administration of the duties connected therewith.

A man of strong character and unbounded energy, he has ever stood true in all the relations of life and has acquired a high and well-deserved popularity. He was a candidate of the Progressive Young Men of Pocatello for

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Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

mayor of that city in I902 and after a stirring canvass was elected by a very complimentary vote, and he is now in the incumbency of the office, having been elected on the Republican ticket in 1903 by a handsome majority to the second term, running far ahead of the rest of the ticket, and thus proving himself not only a very efficient but an exceedingly popular mayor, ever maintaining a high dignity and performing the duties of the position to the decided advantage of the city.

In county, state and national political affairs he has been an active force in the Republican party. discharging with fidelity and advantage to the people every trust his party has reposed in him. In the last Republican state convention he was distinctively honored by being placed in candidacy for governor of the state, lacking only three votes of securing the nomination. In educational lines his influence and labors have been effective and far-reaching. and he is at present the president of the school board of Pocatello. and he has been an earnest and public spirited member of the board for the last six years. Fraternally he has attained the Knight Templar degree in the Masonic order, being the high priest of the

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Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

local chapter, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and the Eagles.

In Denver, Colo., on December 31, 1900, Dr. Steely was united in matrimony with Miss Bernice H. Smith. a native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of Edwin K. and Helen A. Smith, also natives of the old Bay state. They have one son, Hobart H., and their attractive home possesses a most pleasing atmosphere of cultured hospitality.

It is not too much to say of Dr. Steely. as has been said by several who are excellent judges of character. that his qualifications would dignify and elevate any office in the gift of the people of his state. He has held responsible positions with great ability, has adorned every walk in life in which he has been found, and is an inspiration and example to good men of all classes, while his advice is held most valuable in business and financial circles, and his careful and conscientious execution of every duty has gained him high prestige.

Progressive men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont and Oneida counties, Idaho. 1904.

059

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Virginia Marriage Records, 1700-1850; ‘C’ Surnames

Transcription: Virginia Marriage Records, 1700-1850; ‘C’ Surnames

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Virginia Marriage Records, 1700-1850; ‘C’ Surnames

 

(Featured image above: Cocke’s Mill, Albemarle County, Virginia.)

September, 1789, Clements, John, & Nancy Walthall, (d. of William).
January, 1797, Clements, Joseph, & Susan A. Woodson.
December, 1830, Clements, John, & Martha Webster.
Nov. 13, 1788, Cliborne, Leonard, & Fanny Tanner. Robt. Tanner.
April 14, 1767, Cobbs, John Catlin, & Rachel Smith. Richd. Booker.
December, 1768, Cobbs, Samuel, & Elizb. Munford.  John C. Cobbs.
Jan. 8, 1812, Cobbs, Thos., & Nancy I. Hurt.
Dec. 24, 1764, Cocke, Stephen, & Ann Jones, (d. of Richard).
Nov. 25, 1767, Cocke, James Powell, & Elizb. Archer. Consent of Wm. Archer.
April 11, 1769, Cocke, Chasteen, & Martha Field Archer. Wm. Archer.
Feb. 3, 1779, Cocke, Thos., & Margaret Jones. Stith I-Iardaway.
June, 1794, Cocke, James, & Mary Lewis, (d. of Eliza).
January, 1825, Cocke, Chastain, 8: Sarah Meade Eggleston, (d. of Everard.)
July 10, 1787, Coffee, Thos., & Mary Knight, (d. of Chas.)
March 16, 1784, Cofiery, Barnard, & Agnes Jennings, (d. of Wm.)
Sept. 23, 1769, Cogbill, Charles, & Frances Bottom.
Sept. 18, 1824, Cole, John H., & Harriet Hudson.
March 13, 1781, Coleman, Cain, & Mary Wilson. John Wilson.
July 22, 1782, Coleman, Burrel, & Lucy Bevill, (d. of James).
Dec. 29, 1787, Coleman, Archer, & Eliza Bevill.
October, 1796, Coleman, Wm., & Nancy Clay.
May, 1799, Coleman, Robt., & Elizb. Perkinson.
December, 1805, Coleman, Jesse, & Frances Southall, (d. of John).
March, 1807, Coleman, John, 8: Mary Tally.

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Cocke; Virginia Marriage Records, 1700-1850
Marriage Records of Virginia – some ‘C’ surnames.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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The ancestor quest: humor, poems and prose for Genealogists.

The ancestor quest: humor, poems and prose for Genealogists.

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I have gathered and transcribed several items of humor, poems and prose for Genealogists that have touched me in some way. The ones I have selected and printed below are my favorites of the hundreds that can be found – and the ones that hit home the most.

 

Leaf Divider

 

Dear Ancestor

 

Your tombstone stands among the rest;
Neglected and alone
The name and date are chiseled out
On polished, marbled stone.
It reaches out to all who care
It is too late to mourn.
You did not know that I exist
You died and I was born.
Yet each of us are cells of you
In flesh, in blood, in bone.
Our blood contracts and beats a pulse
Entirely not our own.
Dear Ancestor, the place you filled
So many years ago
Spreads out among the ones you left
Who would have loved you so.
I wonder if you lived and loved,
I wonder if you knew
That someday I would find this spot,
And come to visit you.

Leaf Divider

 

 Genealogy – where you confuse the dead and irritate the living.

 

Leaf Divider

 

Murphy’s Law for Genealogists

 

The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated and at which the platform collapsed under him turned out to be a hanging.

When at last after much hard work you have solved the mystery you have been working on for two years, your aunt says, “I could have told you that.”

You grandmother’s maiden name that you have searched for four years was on a letter in a box in the attic all the time.

You never asked your father about his family when he was alive because you weren’t interested in genealogy then.

The will you need is in the safe on board the Titanic.

Copies of old newspapers have holes occurring only on the surnames.

John, son of Thomas, the immigrant whom your relatives claim as the family progenitor, died on board ship at
age 10.

Your gr. grandfather’s newspaper obituary states that he died leaving no issue of record.

The keeper of the vital records you need has just been insulted by an another genealogist.

The relative who had all the family photographs gave them all to her daughter who has no interest in genealogy and no inclination to share.

The only record you find for your gr. grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff’s sale for insolvency.

The one document that would supply the missing link in your dead-end line has been lost due to fire, flood or war.

The town clerk to whom you wrote for the information sends you a long handwritten letter which is totally illegible.

The spelling for your European ancestor’s name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation.

None of the pictures in your recently deceased grandmother’s photo album have names written on them.

No one in your family tree ever did anything noteworthy, owned property, was sued or was named in wills.

You learn that your great aunt’s executor just sold her life’s collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer “somewhere in New York City.”

Ink fades and paper deteriorates at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

The 37 volume, sixteen thousand page history of your county of origin isn’t indexed.

You finally find your gr. grandparent’s wedding records and discover that the brides’ father was named John Smith.

Leaf Divider

 

Whoever said “Seek and ye shall find” was not a genealogist.

 

Leaf Divider

 

Strangers in the Box

 

Come, look with me inside this drawer,
In this box I’ve often seen,
At the pictures, black and white,
Faces proud, still, and serene.

I wish I knew the people,
These strangers in the box,
Their names and all their memories,
Are lost among my socks.

I wonder what their lives were like,
How did they spend their days?
What about their special times?
I’ll never know their ways.

If only someone had taken time,
To tell, who, what, where, and when,
These faces of my heritage,
Would come to life again.

Could this become the fate,
Of the pictures we take today?
The faces and the memories,
Someday to be passed away?

Take time to save your stories,
Seize the opportunity when it knocks,
Or someday you and yours,
Could be strangers in the box.


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Genealogy Transcription: New England Marriages Prior to 1700; Kni – Kno.

Genealogy Transcription: New England Marriages Prior to 1700; Kni – Kno.

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Following is my transcription of “New England Marriages Prior to 1700″ for surnames starting with ‘K’ from Knight to Knowles, and all varied surnames of spouses.

 

_________________________________

 

NEW ENGLAND MARRIAGES PRIOR TO 1700

 

Knight - U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700

445

KNIGHT, Joseph (1673-) & Martha (GIBSON) LILLEY, w Reuben; 4 Apr 1699; Woburn
KNIGHT, Lawrence (-1728) & Elizabeth INGERSOLL, m/2 John BATTEN 1729; 2 Nov 1696; Salem
KNIGHT, Macklin?/Mautlyn?/Matting? & Dorothy _?_; b 1643; Boston
KNIGHT, Michael & Mary BULLARD; 20 Oct 1657; Woburn
KNIGHT, Nathan & Mary [WESTBROOK]; b Mar 1693/4; Portsmouth/Scarboro
KNIGHT, Philip (-1668) & Margery __?__, ?m/2 Thomas BATEMAN, m/3 Nathaniel BALL 1670/1; b 1647; Charlestown/Topsfield
KNIGHT, Philip & Margaret [WILKINS]; b 1669; Topsfield
KNITE, Philip (1669-1696) & Rebecca [TOWNE] (1668-); b 20 Aug 1693; Topsfield
KNIGHT, Richard (1602-1683) & Agnes [COFFLEY?] (-1679); b 1632; Newbury
KNIGHT, Richard & 1/wf __?_; Hampton, NH
KNIGHT, Richard & Dinah ? ; b 15 May 1642; Boston Y
KNIGHT, Richard (-1680) & 2/wf? [Sarah ROGERS] (-1685+); b 16 Jan 1648(9?), b 1647?, 1648+/- Newport, RI
KNIGHT, Richard & Joanna __?__ (not Ann CROMWELL, w Thomas, m/3 John JOYLIFFE/JOLIFFE, see Robert KNIGHT); b 1652?; Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Julian __?__; b 1664; Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Hannah (TOWNSEND) HULL [ALLEN], w Thomas, w Hope, m/4 Richard WAY 1687; b 1680; Boston/Dover, NH?
KNIGHT, Richard & Remember GRAFFTON/GRAFTON; 10 Apr 1685; Marblehead/Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Sarah [KEMBALL] (-1727, New London); b 1689; Charlestown
KNIGHT, Richard & __?__; b 1690; RI
KNIGHT, Richard (1666-) & Elizabeth [JAQUES] (1669-); b 1697; Newbury
KNIGHT, Robert (1585, 1590-1676) (ae 86 in 1671?) & _?__; b 1631, ca 1620?; York, ME
KNIGHT, Robert (ae 51 in 1666) & 1/wf b 1640; Boston/Salem/Marblehead/Manchester
KNIGHT, Robert (-1655) & 2/wf Ann CROMWELL, w Thomas, m/3 John JOYLIFFE 1656/7; b 1652; Boston
KNIGHT, Robert (1667—1739+) & 1/wf Abigail WILLSON/WILSON; 3 Feb 1686; Ipswich/Manchester
KNIGHT, Roger (1596-1673) & [Anne] __?__; b 1636, b 13 Jul 1633; ?Portsrnouth, NH
KNIGHT, Samuel (1649-) & Amy [CARLE]; ca 1670, bef 27 Jul 1676; Kittery, ME
KNIGHT, Samuel (-by 1715) & Sarah ( __?__ ) HOW, w Abraham; 16 Oct 1685; Roxbury
KNIGHT, Samuel (1675-1721) & Rachel CHASE, m/2 S. MUNKLEY; 19 Jul 1700; Tisbury/Charlestown/Sudbury
KNIGHT, Walter & Elizabeth __?__ (-1634?); b 1610?
KNIGHT, Walter (1587-) & ?2/wf [?Ruth GRAY]; b I642, b 1620?, 1635?; Salem
KNIGHT, William (-1655/6) & 1/wf [?Emma POTTER]; b 1638, b 1635?; Salem/Lynn
KNIGHT, William (-1655/6) & 2/wf Elizabeth (?LEE) BALLARD/BULLARD], W William, m/3 Allen BREAD; aft 1639; Salem
KNIGHT, _ ?__ & Sarah __?__ (1665-1727): New London
KNIGHT, __?__ & Sarah __?__; Boston
KNIGHT, Walter & __?__; b 1651; Braveboat Harbor
KNOTT, Andrew & Susanna __?__; b 1689; Boston
KNOTT, George (-1648) & Martha ? _ (-1673/4); b 1630?, b 1634; Sandwich
KNOTT, Richard (-1684) & Hannah (DEVEREUX) [GREENFIELD], w Peter, m/ 3 Joseph SOUTH by 1689; ca 1674?, aft 1672, ca 1672; Marblehead
KNOWER/KNOWES, George (1617, 1697?-1675) & Elizabeth __? _; b 1650; Charlestown
KNOWER, Jonathan & Sarah [WINSLOW]; b 1685, b 1680; Malden/Charlestown
KNOWLES, Alexander (-1663) & __?__; b 1634?; Fairfield, CT
KNOWLES, Edward (1671-1740) & 1/wf Ann RIDLEY; 27 Feb 1699/1700; Eastham
KNOWLES, Eleazer (?1645-1731) & Mary _ ? _ (-1732); ca 1681?, b 1683; Woodbury, CT
KNOLLYS, Rev. Hanser (1598-1691, in Eng) & Anne? …ENEY (-1671, in 63rd y); Dover, NH/Eng
KNOWLES, Henry (?1609-1670) & _ ? _ [POTTER] (-1670+); b 1645; Warwick, Rl
KNOWLES, Henry & __?__
KNOLLES, John (-1685) & Elizabeth (WILLIS?/BILLS?], w Ephraim DAVIS?; b 1641; Watertown/Eng
KNOWLES, John (-1705) & Jemima ASTEN/AUSTIN (1641-]; 10 Jul 1660; Hampton, NH

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The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images.

To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.

 


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Dates and details: Keep a genealogy resource file.

Dates and details: Keep a genealogy resource file.

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Everyone knows that Portland is in Oregon, don’t they, but what year did that area develop?

 

Did you know that in earlier times, it was in the Oregon Territories?

 

Hmm.

 

And when did Saskatchewan become a province, eh?

 

These details about states, provinces, counties, and other events, can be overwhelming if you try to remember them all.

 

Don’t.

 

keep a genealogy resource file

Start to develop and keep a genealogy resource file; or you could file papers in your family Genealogy folders or create a computer folder in your Genealogy master folder with specific dates and places to keep track of.

For example, you may need to know when your ancestors emigrated into the USA, in order to determine where to research their entry. Although you may think you know a great deal about Ellis Island and immigration, it was used for screening immigrants from these dates only – January 1, 1892 to 1924.

However, during those years over 400,000 immigrants were screened via the Barge Office (at the tip of Manhattan) in 1891 before the official immigration office was opened. Those dates, 1892-1924, would be useful to have in a handy form, wouldn’t they?

Before that time, Castle Garden (Castle Clinton) at the southern tip of Manhattan, NY City, was an immigrant receiving center from August 1,1855 to April 18, 1890 – more good dates to know.

Search “US immigration, timeline” for more information, including how to search both Ellis Island and Castle Garden records.

Did your ancestors come to North America from another country?

Ireland, for instance?

It would help to know dates of the major famine periods in Ireland, (search “famines, Ireland”) as well as where most emigrating Irish families landed in Canada or the United States.

Or, if they crossed the sea to England, where might they have landed there?

ArchivesIf you are searching censuses in England, many counties changed boundaries several times, particularly after the 1974 Boundary Changes, but some changed prior to that time.

One line of my family lived in the Black Midlands, and their town (Dudley) changed counties several times between Staffordshire and Worcestershire. I was sure that others must have recorded the county incorrectly, until I found an article detailing the various changes in boundaries!

Search online for “British counties, changes” and you will find several excellent sites with details.

You can imagine how important this information could be when searching through Censuses! I’ve learned to check on maps, and look in nearby counties, states, provinces, when researching an ancestor’s residences over time.

We are used to registering every life event with the government, but such was not the case in our ancestors’ days.

For example, passenger lists were not required to be recorded and filed until 1865 in Canada, 1820 in the USA, 1837 in much of England.

In Germany, some vital statistic registrations began in 1792, others not until 1876, varying by state, and they were not kept in a central repository. In general, birth, marriage, death registrations were not required until a state/county or province was formed and had a center for records.

This date of “vital statistics” is remarkably varied throughout the world, and you will need to have the details for each place, in order to search successfully and efficiently for your ancestors.

My personal Genealogy Resource File includes the following (based on my particular ancestors):

  1. Canadian Provinces/Territories, dates of Confederation and Civil Registration – and maps!
  2. Canadian ships passenger lists source (at Library & Archives)
  3. Border Crossings dates, and Passport requirements for both US and Canada
  4. Canadian land grants periods
  5. U.S. States (PA, CT, NY, MA, ME, WA, OR) and county borders, history of formation
  6. Immigration dates for Ellis Island, Crystal Garden
  7. US cities receiving immigration ships; dates
  8. Dates of US wars from 1600-1945
  9. UK Civil registrations, where held
  10. UK counties, border changes, where to find details
  11. Scotland, Ireland church registrations, census dates
  12. The German Palatine emigration paths
  13. Blank Census forms for Canada, USA, UK

…and much more! Pensions, social insurance records, railway historical maps – there is no end to the variety of resources available to help you.

I also have old and current maps of all sorts including of villages, land grants, towns, county borders, plus details of various historical events which might have impacted on my ancestors’ lives.

All of these resources in a genealogy resource file would make your research more efficient and accurate, plus these resources will allow you to provide correct citations of the sources you find.

Enjoy your research and build up your own personalized Genealogy Resource File!

Now that you understand some of the common issues of internet genealogy, you may want to look at other helpful resources.

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About the Author

Celia Lewis, MA, is a Genealogy Consultant who loves both mysteries and families, finding Genealogy research a perfect fit! Now retired, she enjoys having the time to pursue her passions, along with spending time with her five grandchildren.

photo credit: waterlilysage via photopin cc


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The UK National Archives’ site “The Cabinet Papers”: UK government history.

The UK National Archives’ site “The Cabinet Papers”: UK government history.

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Flag of UKWhat is available to researchers on “The Cabinet Papers” site?

Records from 1915 to 1982 including full text is searchable from this site. Some of these records, however, have been redacted under the Public Records Act.

These records include:

  • Decisions and discussions of cabinet.
  • Background reports and papers provided for cabinet ministers before cabinet meetings.
  • Handwritten notebooks of the Cabinet Secretary. Only those after 1941 survive.
  • Publications that describe the Cabinet office and procedures.

Records of the various committees and associated bodies including the Chiefs of Staff Committee are not digitized. It is possible to discover topics of discussion through diaries, memoirs and correspondence of those holding positions within and involved in government.

Digitisation of Cabinet secretaries’ notebooks are in progress, while those prior to March 1964 are already available and searchable.

There is a 30 year rule in place, during which Cabinet records remain unavailable to the public, resulting in conclusions and memoranda for Cabinet meetings of 1978 to 1982 have been made available and searchable online.

Links to relevant topics are:

Other features of this site include:

Studies

Government

Writing Frame

Historical Maps


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Alanson and Gardner Adams, Brothers in Arms in the War of 1812

Alanson and Gardner Adams, Brothers in Arms in the War of 1812

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I mentioned in a previous post about William B. Coon, who served as a soldier for the United States in the War of 1812 and was the father of Civil War casualty David Coon, that I would be writing about Alanson Adams (fifth great grandfather to my kids) who was father to David Coon’s first wife Mary Ann Adams.

 

Alanson and Gardner Adams both fought in the War of 1812.

 

Alanson Adams
Alanson Adams

Alanson was born April 16, 1792 to Joseph Adams (born 1756) in Williston, Vermont, United States and was the brother of Gardner Adams.

Alanson and Gardner Adams - Muster Roll
Alanson and Gardner Adams – War of 1812 Muster Roll.

Alanson worked as a farmer until he enlisted along with his brother Gardner on January 28, 1813 for service as soldiers for the United States in the War of 1812, both as Privates with Captain Samuel R. Gordon and Captain (later Lieutenant) Valentine R. Goodrich’s Company of the 11th Infantry Regiment in Vermont.

On February 28, 1814, Alanson’s brother Gardner was recorded to be sick in hospital at Brownsville. He had been shot in the leg, and as a result of this injury, he received a military pension after his discharge on January 28, 1818, just one day following the discharge of his brother Alanson.

Submit Hall
Submit (Mitty) Hall

Alanson married Submit “Mitty or Malinda” Hall in 1840 and they had the following children: Elam Dennis Adams (1821-1897), Martha Marie Adams (1827-1861) and Mary Ann Adams (1824-1859), first wife of Civil War veteran David Coon (fourth great grandfather to my kids). Throughout his life, he worked as a farmer (early years), labourer in manufacturing and as a shoemaker.

Sometime between 1840 and 1844, Alanson and his family relocated to Licking County, Ohio, living there until after 1860, when they are recorded in the census at Fold du Lac, Wisconsin, where he is shown living near his son Elam Dennis Adams.

The wealth of Alanson and his family appears to have fluctuated considerably. In 1850, he owned $600 value in real estate, yet in 1860 his wealth had reduced to just $100 in personal goods (no real estate), and then in 1870 he owned $1,000 in real estate. It is unknown whether Alanson had any personal wealth in 1880 as he is showing in the Canadian census to be living with the family of his son Elam Dennis Adams, while still in Fold du Lac, Wisconsin.

Alanson and his family were members of the Baptist Church.

Alanson died April 23, 1881 while living in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The following obituary was published in the Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth of Tuesday, April 26, 1881, on page 4.

 

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest. Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history. We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man. During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent. A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time. Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations. Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers. Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor. In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812. He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane. At the latter place he was wounded. Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country. He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress. To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day. By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history. Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State. In 1818 he was married. The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years. In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio. Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided. Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years. He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best. The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

Sources:

  1. Payroll of a Company of Infantry Commanded by Lt. Valentine R. Goodrich, the Eleventh Regiment of the United States, for the Months of January and February, 1813, online [], accessed.
  2. Emily Bailey, “Mary Ann Adams,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  3. Coon, David, death certificate no. Widow’s Claim to Pension – Emma and Hiram Coon (1864).
  4. Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams (31 Mar 1869).
  5. Adams, Alanson obituary, Fond du Lac Commonwealth, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Tuesday, April 26, 1881, Pg. 4.
  6. 1840 US Census, , (Burlington, Chittenden, Vermont); 541, Roll: 48; Page: 541; Image: 101, Family History Library Film: 0027439, 48, Original data: Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. (NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29, National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  7. 1870 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); Page: 285B, Roll: M593_1713; Page: 285B; Image: 577, Family History Library Film: 553212, Roll: M593_1713, Image: 577, National Archives and Records Administration, n.d., Washington, D.C..
  8. 1880 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); 212A, Roll: 1425; Page: 212A; Enumeration District: 41, Family History Film: 1255425, 1425, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, USA, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  9. 1800 US Census, , (Williston, Chittenden, Vermont, USA); 350, Roll: 51; Page: 350; Image: 195, Family History Library Film: 218688, 51, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  10. Adjutant-General, “Adjutant-General’s Report,” jpg, Roll of Capt. V. R. Goodrich’s Company (: accessed ).
  11. “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.

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Google Tools, Tips and Tricks for Genealogy

Google Tools, Tips and Tricks for Genealogy

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In my 12+ years of genealogy experience, I have become very attached to the Google tools, tips and tricks for genealogy research!

 

Once I discovered these tools, I haven’t looked back. I use them frequently in the course of my research.

 

Free Genealogy Search Help

This is the one Google search tool I use most often – and therefore I’m listing the direct link here. It creates a series of searches using different groupings of keywords from the input boxes for given names, surnames, birth and death places.

Easy Google Genealogy Searcher

Provided by Ancestor Search, this page provides several pre-set custom Google searches and tools. This is especially valuable for those who are not familiar with the codes and conventions for custom searching in Google. Below are basic descriptions and hints for effective use of each search tool. The tools on this page include:

Google Genealogy Search

  • Use (“) quotation marks around a specific word or phrase to be included “as is” in your results.

Search for Genealogy Surname Websites

  • This tool is valuable for finding websites with specific surnames in the title, most especially when surnames are also common English words in every day use such as ‘Mason’ or ‘Forest’; are also ‘given’ or ‘first’ names like ‘James’ or ‘Stuart’. In addition, this search helps to delve into more obscure sites that are deeper in Google results.

Google Book Search

  • An inordinate amount of valuable genealogy data exists within books and publications that in the past were not easily searchable. Google has taken great strides in digitizing ‘in copyright’ and ‘out of copyright’ material for access online. This tool searches the full texts of books digitized by Google. Although not as high in quality as vital records such as births, deaths and marriages, when such records are not available or cannot be found, this is the next best thing. A great benefit of material obtained this way is that it is frequently in narrative form, recounting actual events and circumstances, adding ‘flesh’ to the ‘bones’ of most genealogy research.

Google Blog Search

  • Tool for searching within other blogs. This can be very helpful for finding data compiled by other genealogists who have their own blogs.

Google Newspaper Search

  • Search for obituaries, news stories or other items appearing in newspapers. Be sure to use the surname as well as specific keyword(s) in your search.

Google Search Within or Excluding a Genealogy Site

  • Enter the keyword(s) and relevant site name in the appropriate boxes and select either ‘only with’ or ‘excluding’ in the drop-down box.

Search for Sites Similar To

  • Enter the url of a site you’d like to use as an example. Useful for finding similar sites on a specific topic.

Search for Gedcom Files

  • GEDCOMS are valuable files created by genealogy software for easy transfer and import of data in a manageable size. For this to be useful, it is necessary to have software to either convert to a viewable format or with the ability to import.

Search US Newsgroups for Genealogy Queries

  • Newsgroups are online communities of like-minded researches who post information, queries and answers. To limit results to just genealogy sites, add the word ‘genealogy’ to the search string.

Search for Definitions of Genealogical Words

  • The Google Dictionary searches for definitions for dated words, terms and acronyms. Very useful for finding the meanings of old-fashioned terminology frequently used in genealogy data and research.

Google Genealogy Calculator

  • An amazing tool for calculating are or distance using old-fashioned words and phrasing (i.e. calculating dates using mathematical functions: [1927-82] or converting old fashioned measures into contemporary measures (i.e. 40 rods in miles). If an immediate result is not shown, the page will likely list another calculator to use (i.e. arpents – no answer shows, but an arpent calculator appears toward the bottom of the results page).

Search for Genealogy Images

  • A tool to search for images by keyword using file type and size filters. This is actually quite an amazing little tool. I always use it when reseraching and I’m constantly amazed at how many images it finds on obscure websites that I never would have found.

Search by Location

  • Perform a keyword search filtered by location using address, city, state, and or code.

Google Search for a US Street Map

  • Search for specific locations (old or recent) to locate nearby landmarks (i.e. civic buildings, schools, churches, hospitals, etc.)

Google Search by Language and Country

  • This tool is invaluable for those seeking to search websites in a specific language and/or from a specific country.

Google Translate Text

  • A quick and easy tool for translating snippets of text. Select the languages of conversion from the drop-down box.

Translate a Genealogy Web Page

  • To translate a full web page, type the full url (including ‘http://’) into the search box and select the languages of conversion in the drop-down box.

Google Search by Family Tree

  • This is the one Google tool I use the most. It’s ideal for searching for specific combinations of names and relationships, thereby eliminating a great deal of ‘chaff’.

Following are more generic tools that can be very effective for genealogy related searches:

‘Related Images’ Image Scrolling

  • Every keyword search produces a set of links in the ribbon across the top of the screen. Click on ‘Images’ to go to only image results. Then, across the top of every Google image results page is a list of any ‘related search’ links that exist. Just hover over a link to view a preview ribbon of images from that search.

Image Search

  • This search can be very useful for trying to identify photos by individuals, locations, etc. by uploading the photo for Google to compare to other photos on the Internet to finds similar photos. Searches can be filtered for only faces, clip art, high-res, etc.

Results from Those We Know and Trust

  • When signed into Google+ and with the search options set to allow personal results, Google will highlight results from within your own Google+ community with this icon.
  • If you wish to toggle personal results off, just click on this icon in the top right of your screen.
  • Here is an image of some of my own personal results after searching for the town in which I live:

    Google Plus Personal Results

Include or Exclude Words in Search Results

  • To make sure certain words are included in the search without regard for order, use the ‘+’ symbol (i.e. Christian +Keefer). Likewise, to exclude words, use the ‘-‘ symbol (i.e. Christian -Keefer).

Ensure an Exact Phrase or Group of Words in Search Results

  • Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of the string that you wish to be exact in your search results (i.e. “Christian Keefer”).

Using a Wild Card Effectively

  • Wild card searches are especially effective in genealogy. With Google, the ‘*’ can be used in place of a word if there could possibly be more than one choices in a phrase or if you don’t know what the word might be. For a wildcard search, insert the ‘*’ wildcard in place of the word(s) in question.  (i.e. “Christian Keefer” “* Jacques”). In this example, the missing first name is represented by the ‘*’ and search results come up showing several possible first name possibilities.

Narrowing Search Results

  • Despite our first instinct to throw as many words as possible into a search, this actually can defeat the purpose. The extra words will most likely result in unrelated results due the the extra word(s). Start with as few words as possible and add ‘key’ words to your search in an attempt to narrow your results.

Targeted Searches

  • To search only specific sites, add the ‘site:’ prefix to the desired url (i.e. site:emptynestthemes.com). You can also search specific site types, domains and/or countries signified by a url suffix. Just add the same site prefix when searching (i.e. ‘site:edu’ for education sites; ‘site:ca’ for Canadian sites).
  • To find related websites, use the prefix ‘related:’ in front of the site’s url (i.e. related:emptynestthemes.com).
  • To search for specific file types, use the  ‘filetype:’ prefix in front of the desired file extension within your search string (i.e. filetype:png chilliwack schools).
  • To find definitions with Google, use the ‘define:’ prefix in front of the term to get a list of definitions from several online dictionaries.
  • Search for any numbers in a specific such as price ranges by placing two dots ‘..’ between the two numbers (i.e. Chilliwack real estate $100,000..$300,000).
  • Google can be used as a calculator. Just type in the equation using symbols to represent the functions. (i.e. 100*10, 100/10, 100-10, or 100+10). The first entry in the search results page will be the answer to the equation entered.

 


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 14 Nov 2014

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 14 Nov 2014

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The following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates and additions to 14 Nov 2014.

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Street-in-Wales.jpg” alt=”FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates” width=”343″ height=”245″ /> FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org

Albania

Australia

Canada

Czechoslovakia

South Africa

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com

United Kingdom

United States

 


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – May 27, 2014

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – May 27, 2014

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The following are the newest FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates and additions to May 27, 2014.

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/se.gif” alt=”Ancestry.com Updates and Additions” width=”346″ height=”216″ /> FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Brazil

Canada

Chile

China

Czechoslovakia

New Zealand

Peru

Spain

Ukraine

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Belgium

Italy

Indonesia

Netherlands

Peru

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

 

 

 


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Genealogy News Bites to May 26, 2014

Genealogy News Bites to May 26, 2014

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Following are the recent Genealogy News Bites and Headlines to May 26, 2014

 

Genealogy News Bites

Genealogy News Bites and Headlines

National Archives

The National Archives at St. Louis thanks WWII Navy veteran Paul Wittmer

The National Archives at St. Louis staff extended a special thanks to World War II U.S. Navy Veteran Paul Wittmer on April 14. During World War II, Wittmer served on six war patrols on the USS Tinosa SS-283. He was part of the crew responsible for the capture of the famed Japanese I-401 submarine taken at the end of the war and returned to Pearl Harbor from Japan

Green Valley News

Genealogy Today: Historic diseases, epidemics our ancestors faced

Those of us born in the latter half of the 20th century may not realize how many diseases we’re no longer subject to that once affected our ancestors’ lives. Probably the world’s best known epidemic is the Great Plague of London in 1665. The last in a

Genealogy Canada

The Empress of Ireland – May 29, 1914

The sinking of the RMS Empress of Ireland at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River in 1914 had a great affect on the people of Canada, as more than 1,000 people lost their lives when the ship was stuck by the SS Storstad on that fateful foggy morning

Family History Libraries offers FREE scanning

You can now take your photos and other documents to your nearest Family History Library and scan them for FREE! They have recently installed a customized Lexmark multifunction product (MFPs) which quickly scan photos or

Olive Tree Genealogy

Never Before Seen Photographs from World War One Frontline

In keeping with Memorial Day weekend in the United States, here is a link to an interesting story with photos.  A Viscount in the Armoured Cavalry Branch of the French Army  left a collection of hundreds of glass plates taken during World War One that have never been published before. The images show the daily life of soldiers in the trenches, destruction of towns and military leaders

WW2 Collection on Fold3 FREE until May 31, 2014

Find your family heroes in Fold3′s vast collection of WWII documents, records, and images, including draft registration cards, Army enlistment records, Navy muster rolls, “Old Man’s Draft” registration cards, missing air crew reports, casualty lists, and more.  You can also explore records that provide historical context, such as Navy war diaries, submarine patrol reports, naval press

An index to Niagara area Loyalists and their Land Certificates

Image 160 Index of names H 1140 Canadiana.Org has digitized 21 films of the Heir & Devisee Commission Papers (Heir & Devisee Commission papers 1797-1854, found in their Heritage Collection), and that’s a good thing for genealogists

Dallas Morning News

Q&A: Maud Newton on why we’re obsessed with genealogy

Maud Newton’s fascination with charting her family tree puts her very much in line with a renewed American interest in genealogy — a journey that today can be assisted by the apparent precision of DNA analysis and instant online access to centuries of

Ancestry.com Blog

Finding Ocean State Ancestors: Rhode Island Research Guide

The history of Rhode Island is tied to religion and trade. Settlement began with Roger Williams, who in 1636 went to present-day Rhode Island after being banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his religious views

Quaker Calendars & Dates: In Just Two Days, Tomorrow Will be Yesterday

There is no doubt about it: Quaker dating in letters and meeting minutes is confusing! When you begin researching Quaker records, you may be tempted to “correct” the dates that you find. You would not be alone in thinking this way. Let’s take a look at the reasoning behind the Quaker calendar and dating practices and how to interpret them

Find A Grave Mobile App for iOS: Update

As we continue to improve the mobile app for iOS, your feedback is crucial—we are constantly checking the comments and requests that come in through mobilefeedback@findagrave.com. In fact, this latest release is in response to a problem we’ve heard a lot of you report, and we think we’ve solved it in a way that will help make things easier

Should You Go Fast and Far? Or Slow and Sure?

For Mother’s Day, I wrote a post about taking your tree back as far as you can go on your matrilineal line:  I Can Take My Tree All The Way Back to Eve. How Far Does Your Matrilineal Line Go? Some who saw the headline for the post thought I meant Adam and Eve from the Bible

Linking AncestryDNA to Trees – Now Even to Shared Ones

You can link your AncestryDNA test results to only one tree, but it can be any tree that you are an editor on. If you would like to link your DNA results to a tree that someone has shared with you, you will need to be an editor on this tree

Genea-Musings

Calling all Genealogy Jamboree Attendees: Ancestry Needs You!

Ancestry depends on user input to help mold the future generation of their offerings. A range of opportunities are being planned here at SCGS for participants to share their impressions of upcoming Ancestry features across multiple products.  These will include both focus groups and individual interviews all four days of the conference

The National Archives Blog

Using WordPress to manage our web content

During our website redesign process, the goal has been to make our site as efficient, effective and satisfying as possible for visitors. The web team has written a series of

The best of Friends

The National Archives – full of national treasures, and a national treasure itself. The Friends of The National Archives is a registered charity and voluntary organisation, dedicated to supporting the

FamilySearch.org Blog

New Online Collection of Civil War Records Released in Observance of Memorial Day

In conjunction with Memorial Day, FamilySearch.org announced today significant updates to its free Civil War historic record collections online. The new FamilySearch.org/civil-war landing page provides a quick overview of the vast array of historic records and aids for those researching casualties and veterans of the Civil War

RootsTech 2015 Call for Presentations

RootsTech 2015 will be held February 11-14, 2015 at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. We are calling for dynamic presentations that inform and educate both those seeking to begin and those who are seeking to continue discovering their family story through technology

Norway Celebrates Its 200th Anniversary—Online Data Making It Easier to Trace Your Norwegian Roots

If you have family roots in Norway, you have a celebration coming up. The bicentennial of Norway’s independence is May 17th. There are almost as many descendants of Norwegians in the U.S. (4.5M) as there are in Norway today (5M). Norwegians are the 10th largest American ancestry group in the US

NARAtions

Digitization of Alaska Records

Your participation and feedback is essential to the operations of the National Archives. As part of ongoing budget adjustments, the National Archives at Anchorage will close in the coming months, and archival records will be moved to the National Archives at Seattle

Library and Archives Canada

New finding aids available online

Library and Archives Canada has begun an initiative that will see the digitization and transcription of several significant finding aids. Adding these finding aids online will help users find material much more easily. We will continue to add other finding aids throughout the year, but so far

Discover Magazine

Ancient Cave Skeleton Sheds Light on Early American Ancestry

Genetic studies have pointed to a Siberian ancestry for modern Native Americans. Most researchers believe the first Americans (Paleoamericans) migrated from northwest Asia via Beringia, the now-submerged land bridge

photo credit: reinvented via photopin cc


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