Tag: Nova Scotia

Historic Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne.

Historic Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne.

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One of the best things we did on a trip we took to Nova Scotia a few years ago was to see the Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne.

 

Historic Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne.
Historic Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne (Click on the image to see it in full size.) The top image at right is of our son and daughter listening to the fascinating tales associated with the burials. The lower image (although difficult to make out in the dusk) is of our family gathered with the tour guide at Fort Anne prior to the tour.

This was during our long awaited driving tour of Acadian heritage sites in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada.

The first stop we made in Nova Scotia was at a campground near Annapolis Royal and I spotted a ‘newspaper’ on the counter at check-in. It caught my eye because the top of the page showed a picture of a man with his name written underneath – ‘Alan Melanson’. This peaked my interest as Melanson is my mother’s maiden name and the Melansons are one of the pioneer families to settle in Acadia.

It seemed that Alan Melanson was the tour guide for the Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne, prompting Mark, the kids and I to check it out the next day. Once Alan arrived we got into a conversation about my Melanson family and how we are related to him.

In the image above, the tour guide holding the lantern at the gravestone is Alan Melanson, a distant cousin as we both descend from Charles ‘dit La Ramée’ Mellanson, one of the two sons of the founding couple of the Melanson family in Acadia.

The photos on this website were taken by a photographer snapping shots the evening we toured the old graveyard. He had asked permission to take pictures with the kids in them and we agreed in return for copies.

Later on, we found that Erin and Stu’s photos were on the Fort Anne Graveyard Tour’s website!

I took this image directly from the Fort Anne Graveyard Tour website, except that I captured the picture of the crowd in front of the fort building as it includes myself, my husband Mark and our two teenagers, Erin and Stuart. One of the images in the clip features Erin and Stuart under lamplight at the gravestone.

I would highly recommend this tour to anyone. Alan Melanson is an engaging and entertaining host, injecting humor and insight into his tour.

It’s not hard to imagine some of the colorful characters buried in this centuries old graveyard.


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Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

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Transcription: Documents related to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton.

____________________________________________________

The following are transcriptions from photographic images of approximately half of a collection of documents related to the marriage of Elizabeth Sampson and Clifford Carter of Sampsonville, County of Richmond, Nova Scotia, Canada. The second half of the transcriptions and links to the actual document images will be published either tomorrow or the day after.

Fine print in the margins was indecipherable due to image quality.

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my son Clifford Carter (who is within twenty one years) to Elizabeth Sampson.

his
Philip  X  Carter
mark

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my daughter Elizabeth Sampson (who is within the age of twenty one years) to Clifford Carter.

Mr. Vinny Sampson
his
X
mark
Witness

Laura Sampson

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

29/

May 20/16

No……………………191

Clifford Carter

AND

Elizabeth Sampson

MARRIAGE LICENSE AFFIDAVIT

Rich

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

(There is indecipherable fine pring text in the left 1″ margin, due to image quality.)

FORM OF AFFIDAVIT

I, Clifford Carter
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
labourer make oath and say as follows :

I, and Elizabeth Sampson
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
are desirous of entering into the contract of
marriage, and of having our marriage solemnzed at Sampsonville
in the County of Richmond.

I am the age of nineteen and eleven months years, and the said
Elizabeth Sampson, is
under twenty one years.

I am a bachelor and the said Elizabeth
Sampson is a spinster.

Philip Carter & Vin Sampson of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond labourers, both whose consent to such marriage is required, has consented thereto in writing

(Two lines of ‘struck-through’ text that is unreadable.)

I believe that there is no affinity, consanguinity, prior marriage or other lawful causes or legal impedment to bar or hinder the solemnization of our marriage.

Sworn to at St. Peters in the
County of Richmond
this 16th
day of May 1916.

Clifford Carter
Signature of Deposed

Before me,
A. J. MacCuish
Issuer of Marriage License

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

___________

V 29

Richmond – 1916

Carter, Clifford

Sampson, Elizabeth

—————-

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Here are more documents related to this marriage.

—————-

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

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I had to post this article as soon as I saw it. Visiting this graveyard was one of the best family experiences we’ve ever had – and it was a great opportunity to explore our own family history.

As a matter of fact, the tour guide, Alan Melanson and I are 7th great grandchildren of Charles Mellanson and Marie Dugas (Charles was a son of the original Melanson couple – Pierre and Priscilla.)

Stuart, Erin and Alan Melanson in graveyard.
My children, Erin and Stuart, sit through an enthralling tale told by fellow ‘Melanson’ cousin, Alan Melanson, the very informative and entertaining tour guide.
It’s been a century since Fort Anne became Canada’s first administered national historic site, but much of the history surrounding the once hotly contested grounds in Annapolis Royal, N.S., is still shrouded in mystery.

On Monday, a team of researchers hope to use new technology to unlock some of the old secrets buried within Fort Anne’s Garrison Graveyard, which is one of the oldest English cemeteries in Canada.

“To understand where we’re going, we need to understand where we’ve been,” said Ted Dolan, Parks Canada’s site and visitor experience manager for historic sites in southwestern Nova Scotia.

“Any additional information that we have as to what happened on our landscape in the past is really going to inform us as to who we are and where we come from.”

Dolan describes Fort Anne as “the most fought-over piece of land in Canadian history since European colonization.” Originally fortified by the Scots as early as 1629, the site was later taken over by the French, before it fell to British troops in 1710. It would remain a regular battle scene for another 50 years.

While over 200 British headstones still stand in the Garrison Graveyard, Dolan said researchers believe there could be more than 2,000 people buried at the site whose wooden markers have since decayed over time.

In addition, prior to 1710, Dolan said French soldiers and Acadians from the region were buried at the nearby St. Jean-Baptiste parish, which had a cemetery located close to the fort.

While researchers aren’t completely sure where the French and Acadian cemetery is, he said they have a “pretty good idea. . .”

Read on . . .

Source: Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries | CTV News Atlantic


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Preparations underway to commemorate 100th anniversary of Halifax Explosion | CTV Atlantic News

Preparations underway to commemorate 100th anniversary of Halifax Explosion | CTV Atlantic News

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Special ceremonies will be held Wednesday to mark the 100th anniversary of a disaster of epic proportions. 

Two thousand people died and 9,000 were injured after the Norwegian relief vessel SS Imo collided with a French munitions ship laden with explosives, the SS Mont Blanc, in Halifax in 1917.

All of it is fascinating to new generations learning about the Halifax Explosion for the first time in Saint Patrick’s Church, which was damaged but still standing after the blast.

“They’re learning it in school because of the 100th anniversary and they have to be the next generation who passes it on,” says historian and author Blair Beed.

General awareness signs of the Halifax Explosion are popping up all over the city. A mass grave for unidentified victims was spruced up for the occasion, and a powerful sense of pride can be felt in the north end, which bore the brunt of the blast.

Work is wrapping up on the revitalized Fort Needham Memorial Park, where the main ceremony will take place. A new plaza has been constructed, along with landscaping around the bell tower. Even the upgraded playground evokes memories of what happened in December of 1917.

“It is a place that reflects the devastation and appropriately pays tribute to those who were killed and injured, balanced against the functionality of a park,” says Craig Walkington of the Halifax Explosion Anniversary Advisory Committee.

Firefighters, too, will again mark the anniversary. For them, the day marks an important commemoration for a department devastated by the blast.

 “We lost nine members from the Halifax Fire Department, and still, to this date, is the largest loss of firefighter life in one single incident,” says Division Commander Brad Connors. “So it’s pretty significant for us to remember that event and to pay homage to those members.”

A permanent memorial was revealed on the Boston Common Thursday commemorating the explosion. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh and other city officials joined Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil and Halifax Mayor Mike Savage for the unveiling of the large plaque.

Read on…

Source: Preparations underway to commemorate 100th anniversary of Halifax Explosion | CTV Atlantic News


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Canada Post issues Halifax Explosion stamp marking 100 years since the disaster | CTV Atlantic News

Canada Post issues Halifax Explosion stamp marking 100 years since the disaster | CTV Atlantic News

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THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Monday, November 6, 2017 7:29AM AST
Last Updated Monday, November 6, 2017 11:25AM AST

 

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia Lt.-Gov Arthur J. LeBlanc has unveiled a Canada Post stamp that commemorates the Halifax Explosion.

The stamp depicts the moments after the munitions vessel SS Mont Blanc collided with the SS Imo in Halifax harbour on Dec. 6, 1917.

The image of the ships is depicted with a newspaper headline from 1917 saying “Halifax Wrecked.”

Designer Larry Burke says the challenge was to tell the story in a way that had enough impact so people would understand the “enormity” of the tragedy.

Burke says the newspaper headline “really says everything”, and he knew it had to be at the heart of the stamp’s concept.

The massive explosion that resulted from the harbour collision killed 2,000 people, injured 9,000 and left 25,000 homeless.

 

Source: Canada Post issues Halifax Explosion stamp marking 100 years since the disaster | CTV Atlantic News

 


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Province to help African Nova Scotians get title to land given centuries ago | CTV Atlantic News

Province to help African Nova Scotians get title to land given centuries ago | CTV Atlantic News

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HALIFAX — The Nova Scotia government says it is poised to help black residents who have struggled for decades to gain clear title to land that has been in their families since many arrived as Loyalists in the 1800s.

African Nova Scotian Affairs Minister Tony Ince issued a statement Monday saying an announcement for “new supports” will be made Wednesday in Cherry Brook, a predominantly African Canadian community east of Halifax.

“We have made a commitment to deal with these systemic issues … to ensure that we don’t repeat what has gone on in the past,” Ince said in an interview.

He declined to release any details about the government’s plan.

In the 1800s, the Nova Scotia government provided land to black and white Loyalists, but the Crown didn’t present land titles for black settlers, creating long-standing confusion over ownership in 13 predominantly black communities.

The province’s announcement came the same day an expert panel presented a report on anti-black racism in Canada to the UN Human Rights Council, saying the specific challenges facing African Nova Scotians had to be dealt with.

The UN experts said they were particularly concerned with the province’s failure to properly implement the Land Titles Clarification Act of 1963, which was introduced to help people of African descent get title to land that had been given to their families long ago.

The act was supposed to provide a simple and inexpensive method for clarifying land titles, but Nova Scotia residents told the panel that the process had become expensive, unjust and discriminatory, resulting in many rejected claims. Funding for the program had also dried up over the years.

“Residents must bear the burden for submitting all the documentation, as well as the application, lawyer and surveyor fees necessary to have the land title clarified,” the report said.

“(The) Department of Natural Resources … acknowledged that the process was unclear and stated they were attempting to pilot a project to assist residents in the community to obtain the title to their property … The working group emphasized that the act must be implemented in collaboration with, and for the benefit of, the affected population group.”

Ince said he couldn’t explain why it has taken so long for the province to fix the problem.

“I can’t speak to what other governments did,” he said. “From the African Canadian community (point of view), it’s not a surprise. Those are issues that we live and deal with on a daily basis.”

The CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, Christine Hanson, said she was pleased to learn the government is taking a new approach.

Read more…

 

 

Source: Province to help African Nova Scotians get title to land given centuries ago | CTV Atlantic News


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Children’s books explore restoration amidst tragedy of Halifax Explosion | CTV Atlantic News

Children’s books explore restoration amidst tragedy of Halifax Explosion | CTV Atlantic News

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Michael Tutton, THE CANADIAN PRESS

HALIFAX — A fresh generation of children’s books is finding the grace notes in Halifax’s worst moment — a massive explosion that levelled much of the city 100 years ago but inspired acts of kindness that still resonate.

The books vary on how closely they approach the widespread injury and nearly 2,000 deaths that resulted from the massive Halifax Explosion of Dec. 6, 1917, when a French munitions ship collided with a Belgian relief vessel in the city’s wartime harbour.

Still, as hurricanes and earthquakes batter communities around the globe, the retelling of Halifax’s time of trial tend to come together in their desire to find hope amidst the floods and rubble.

“I didn’t want to dwell on the destruction, but more on the help that people gave,” said Marijke Simons, author of The Flying Squirrel Stowaways: from Nova Scotia to Boston (Nimbus), one of two picture books for young children that recall how Boston residents rushed north in a train to assist.

Other books deal with the experiences of a Halifax newsboy, and of an orphaned girl who loses her family.

The Christmas tree given each year as a gift by Halifax to its southern neighbour is a key theme for Simons as well as for illustrator Belle DeMont and her father John DeMont in their book The Little Tree by the Sea: From Halifax to Boston with love (Nimbus).

The main character in The Little Tree by the Sea is an imaginary tree that grows on the slope of Citadel Hill overlooking the city, calling out in alarm as the Mont Blanc collides with the Imo.

Belle DeMont’s fiery depiction of the blast doesn’t shy away from the terror of the event, though the story shows just a few examples of injured citizens.

Canary yellow streets and pea green city buildings prior to the event move into more sombre indigos and deep purple skies and seas afterwards, as the tree’s cry for help drifts across the water to Boston.

Read more…

 

Source: Children’s books explore restoration amidst tragedy of Halifax Explosion | CTV Atlantic News


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Apr 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Apr 2015.

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Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Apr 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions.

 

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Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

 

Australia

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New Zealand

United Kingdom

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photo credit: Vogan via photopin (license)


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

 

Archives.
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions.

Australia

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Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

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Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to 30 Jan 2015.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/small_288022773.jpg” alt=”Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” width=”240″ height=”159″ /> Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

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Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

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Brazil

Canada

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United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide


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