Tag: MyHeritage

The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

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During Pride Month in June, LGBT people interested in family history received interesting news. Beginning next year, the world’s largest genealogy organization, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will release a redesigned website that will include same-sex families.

FamilySearch.org, sponsored by the Mormons, first said in 2015 that it would add a feature for same-sex relationships, the Deseret News reported. Now, the major overhaul to the website’s system should be ready by 2019.

There are several other family history sites – Ancestry.com is probably the best known – that already allow same-sex recognition. In addition to Ancestry, other major sites are Israel-based MyHeritage and England-based Findmypast. FamilySearch is the only one that is totally free for all of its databases.

For LGBT genealogists, the FamilySearch news was a pleasant surprise . . .

Read on . . .

Source: The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation


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How much it costs to research your family tree | AOL Finance

How much it costs to research your family tree | AOL Finance

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Money doesn’t grow on trees, which is too bad, because it would make researching your family tree a lot easier.
If you aren’t careful, or even if you are, you could end up spending a small fortune while researching your family history.
Just ask Lana Rushing, who owns a public relations firm in Los Angeles. In the spring of 2014, she was on a vacation in Ireland and stopped by the library in Dublin, hoping to learn more about her mother’s side of her family tree. She came away inspired to learn more, soon after subscribing to a genealogy website, getting her DNA tested and traveling in order to search for clues about her past. It’s a hobby that can get costly.

 

“All told, I have spent about $4,800 so far, but it has been worth every penny,” says Rushing, who isn’t including in her tally the cost of that vacation to Ireland.

Most people who spend money researching their family probably do feel that the expense is worth it. After all, looking at genealogy isn’t something one has to do, like paying for car repairs. People do it because they want to. Still, if you’re looking for ways to research your family tree and want to know what you’re in for, or if you want to spend more money in order to dig up more roots, you have a number of things you can spend money on.

 

Genealogy sites.

 

Ancestry.com is likely the best-known of these sites; an annual subscription starts at $189 ($99 for six months). For the money, you’ll receive access to a seemingly limitless amount of historical data, including census and military records as well as birth, marriage and death certificates.

But there are other genealogy sites you may want to check out, such as FamilySearch.org (which is free and a good place to start), FindMyPast.com (starts at $9.95 a month; aimed at people with British and Irish heritage) and Afrigeneas.com (free, and for people researching African-American roots).

You can also use genealogy services without paying for them.

“Most public and state libraries subscribe to one or more genealogy services. These are available [online] at no cost to anyone with a library card, though Ancestry’s library collection can only be accessed from the library [building],” says Stacy Harris, a publisher and editor in Nashville, Tennessee.

 

Genealogy DNA testing services.

 

You know you are part Native American, Pakistani or Italian but are wondering, just how much? You could use companies like MyHeritage DNA, Family Tree DNA, AncestryDNA and 23andMe. Their prices generally range from $79 to $199, with sales sometimes popping up throughout the year.

That can get expensive, though, if you and a spouse or other family members are interested in your ancestry. For instance, over the holidays, Dana Freeman, a travel journalist in Burlington, Vermont, bought DNA kits for herself, her husband, her sister and brother-in-law for a total of $260.

She also purchased a six-month membership to Ancestry.com and is contemplating becoming a paid member to other ancestry websites and doing some travel-related research. She says that she has been interested in genealogy for some time, collecting information from relatives and keeping track of it in a hand-written family tree book she bought 20 years ago for nine bucks. Only recently did she begin spending money to learn more about her past.

“I fear though going forward this endeavor is going to be a lot more expensive,” Freeman says.

Read on . . .

 

Source: How much it costs to research your family tree – AOL Finance


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23andMe and MyHeritage pool their resources.

23andMe and MyHeritage pool their resources.

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The cooperation of 23andMe and MyHeritage to combine their databases for the benefit of their users opens a world of possibilities.
23andMe and MyHeritage
23andMe and MyHeritage pool their resources.

As I work year after year researching my family’s ancestry, it becomes apparent that genealogy researchers are becoming more protective of their information. As a result, access to information is more exclusive and expensive. Despite this, the use of online genealogy resources and databases has grown exponentially.

A surprising benefit of the commercial aspect of genealogy information is the increase in sites offering genealogy data, whether paid or free. Rather than competing against each other, free and paid sites have been cooperating – cross referencing each other’s resources and data, as with Ancestry.com bringing up and linking to free sites such as Library and Archives Canada, BillionGraves.com and FindaGrave.com, to name just a few.

Now, 23andMe, the DNA and genetics company, will be combining its own DNA ancestry database with the family tree database of MyHeritage.

Provide a saliva sample, and 23andMe will discover the geographic origins of ancestors and help connect people to unknown relatives. MyHeritage’s library of over 5.5 billion records, and their technology for automating ancestry research will enable the mapping of ancestral connections via historical records and family trees.

According to MyHeritage CEO Gilad Japhet, “DNA testing can connect you to relatives you never knew existed, who descend from shared ancestors centuries ago, but family trees and historical records are critical to map and fully understand these connections.”

The cooperation of the two companies will enable 23andMe to offer its 750,000 customers access to MyHeritage’s tools and data, and in return, MyHeritage will use 23andMe’s data, allowing the matching of DNA to explore family trees and connections.

23andMe’s Personal Genome Service and DNA tests will both be offered to MyHeritage’s 70 million registered users.

The integration of the two will occur gradually and is expected to be complete by early 2015.

photo credit: Spanish Flea via photopin cc


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MyHeritage, EBSCO to provide genealogy services for institutions.

MyHeritage, EBSCO to provide genealogy services for institutions.

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This press release brings great news for genealogy researchers. We’ve seen this in the past with Ancestry.com in libraries and Family Search through local LDS Family History Centers, and now MyHeritage will be partnering with EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) to provide genealogy services for worldwide institutions and libraries.
Ancestry and genealogy services for institutions
Providing genealogy services for institutions.

PRESS RELEASE
October 7, 2014

MyHeritage, the popular family history network, today announced a significant expansion into the institutional education market, with the launch of a dedicated, high-performance family history genealogy service for worldwide institutions and the signing of a strategic partnership with EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) to distribute it exclusively.

As the leading provider of online research content for libraries and other institutions, EBSCO’s partnership with MyHeritage reaffirms its commitment to providing first-class content to libraries at affordable prices.

EBSCO Senior Vice President of Product Management Michael Laddin, said: “MyHeritage brings to the table an unparalleled offering of a vast, content-rich database and innovative, easy-to-use technologies. With a proven track-record of supporting customers across the globe, we are very excited about this partnership and the value it will bring to libraries and other educational centers worldwide.”

The new, state-of-the-art MyHeritage Library Edition™ MyHeritage Library Edition™ empowers people to discover more about their family history and the lives led by their ancestors. It’s the first product servicing libraries that offers a one-stop-shop of global content, powerful technologies and remote access.

The MyHeritage Library Edition™ provides access to a vast collection of U.S. and international documents online, with images of original documents to enhance research and encourage critical thinking.

Key highlights include:

Vast Global Content

Educational institutions that deploy the MyHeritage Library Edition™ will be able to offer their patrons access to billions of historical documents, millions of historical photos and other resources in thousands of databases that span the past 5 centuries. Available in 40 languages, the MyHeritage Library Edition™ is the industry’s most multilingual family history search engine, breaking down geographical and language barriers in research. The data repository, one of the largest and most internationally diverse of its kind, includes birth, death and marriage records from 48 countries, the complete US and UK censuses, immigration, military and tombstone records and more than 1.5 billion family tree profiles. The database grows at an average pace of more than 5 million records each day.

Powerful Technology

The MyHeritage Library Edition™ builds upon MyHeritage’s deep investment in innovation. Its search engine’s automatic handling of translations, synonyms and spelling variations of millions of names in multiple languages is unparalleled. Its unique Record Detective™ technology takes research one step further by recommending additional records for each record discovered. This enhances research and helps users discover a lot more in less time.

Remote Access

Library members can use the MyHeritage Library Edition™ either at their local library or in the comfort of their own home using remote access.

photo credit: San José Library via photopin cc


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Genealogy News Bites – May 5, 2014

Genealogy News Bites – May 5, 2014

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genealogy news bites picsIn an effort to help ease the load of searching for genealogy news and genealogy events, I prepare a ‘Genealogy News Bites’ post to gather together what I feel are the most important or informative genealogy news headlines from the previous week (or thereabouts). Following are the most recent and relevant genealogy news headlines.

 

Olive Tree Genealogy

Victorian Reform School & Prison Records Online – A Contest!

John Wormald age 11 Reform School 1892 Ancestry.co.uk, Ancestry.ca and Ancestry.com have recently published some fascinating reformatory school and prison records from West Yorkshire

Irish Census Records 1821-1911 online

1821 Census Colebrooke (Aghalurcher, Fermanagh) Irish Census Records from 1821 to 1911 (with gaps 1861 to 1901) are now available online.  The earlier records are scattered and many have not survived but The National Archives of Ireland

Prosapia Genetics – Worth the Money?

Yesterday I decided to check out a website that has the genealogy community buzzing. The Examiner called it a “Groundbreaking GPS tool [that] finds your ancestors, genealogy, family tree and history”  Basically it is being touted as

Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Panel to discuss genealogy issues in La Verne – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

The panel sponsored by the Southern California Society of Professional Genealogists will provide members and guests with a special opportunity to meet in a roundtable setting

Beliefnet

Matthew 1:1-17; The Genealogy of Jesus (Cross-Reference Comparison)

Some believe that Matthew’s genealogy focuses primarily on the family tree of Jesus’ adopted father, Joseph, while Luke’s highlights the lineage of his mother, Mary. Another theory

Genealogy Canada

RCMP obituary card index and notices, 1876-2007

Here is an instance which demonstrates the co-operative partnership that exists between Ancestry and Family Search these days with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) obituaries card and notices between 1876 and 2007

OGS announces officers for 2014-2016

The slate of new officers for 2014-2016 was announced today at the OGS Conference. The president is Alan Campbell. Alan is from the Lambton Branch of the OGS.The vice president i…

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

Evernote Was Made For Genealogy | Eastman’s Online Genealogy …

Cyndi of Cyndi’s List has started a new section entitled, Evernote Was Made For Genealogy. She writes, “I will admit it. I’m an Evernote junkie. I love this tool and all it has to offer

Ancestry.com Blog

Don’t Let Mold Destroy Your Family History

Mold is a four-letter word. It can destroy your documents and it can make you sick. What do you do when you discover that great-grandpa’s Civil War letters or the family Bible has mold on it? Here are some tips


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