Tag: Letters

Researching Welsh Quakers in Pennsylvania.

Researching Welsh Quakers in Pennsylvania.

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Welsh Quaker ancestors are the cultural group from which the majority of the ancestors of my children originate (on my husband’s side).

 

One of the benefits of researching this culture is that the people were religious, often educated (could read and write) and were very good at documenting vital statistics and events. As a result, there are several very good written resources available that directly cite or are based upon this documented data.

The following are valuable, highly informational links to texts and websites focusing on Welsh Quaker pioneers in Pennsylvania.

 

Texts

William Penn
William Penn

Websites


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Genealogy Database

Genealogy Database

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Athelwulf, King of Wessex
Athelwulf, King of Wessex

Our Blythe Genealogy Database

After extensive work, my genealogy database is now updated and links can be found in the upper menu or in the left sidebar. There are thousands of surnames and the extensive lineages include Welsh Quaker immigrants to the USA, French Canadian, Acadian, American pioneers, Canadian pioneers, French, British, Welsh, German, Scandinavian and medieval and royal genealogies.

The database includes extensive facts, sources and some images.


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The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

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The UK National Archives  has a free online search, but there are problems. Some knowledge has always been necessary to search the catalogue with any success.

The Discovery Service makes it easier for everyone – novice to expert – to search and use the collection.

The user is able to search the collection, explore and browse, whether for genealogy research and/or scholastic purposes.

Discovery is a digitized document delivery service that will make it easier to search for genealogy records such as wills and testaments, court proceeding transcription and order digitized genealogy records.

To experience Discovery, visit the Labs section of the National Archives website, the place they release new online services for customers for testing and to provide feedback. New features are being added to Discovery regularly and the latest release includes advanced search and fixes existing problems in previous versions.

The Discovery service will be fully tested and approved before it replaces any other services.

The National Archives holds over 22 million historical government and public records, doubling in just over two years and making it one of the largest archive collections in the world. From Domesday Book to modern government papers and digital files, the collection includes paper and parchment, electronic records and websites, photographs, posters, maps, drawings and paintings.

The old catalogue offered a free search of the collection, but had its problems. A minimum knowledge level was necessary to be able to effectively search the collection. This required level of knowledge made it difficult for new users to take advantage of the search.

The National Archives Discovery Service implemented a system that makes it easier for users of all levels.


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Let’s all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.

Let’s all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.

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I have been researching my family’s genealogy for over twenty years and my appreciation of the tireless and volunteer contributions in the pursuit of genealogy is endless.

 

All of our continuing efforts to expand our own genealogies do contribute to the cumulative effort of us all to save and expand our genealogical resources.

 

At one time, the only options for researching outside one’s own community were to depend on the mail system at the time or to travel to the location involved.

Although mail was relatively inexpensive, the flexibility of performing research oneself was lost. There was no opportunity to just dive right in and pursue a lead found in the return information. One would then have to mail another request, and then another, and then another – making this process time-consuming.

Submit Hall
Submit Hall

Travel to the location(s) in question could be very expensive, but resulted in the opportunity to pursue leads found while on site. If new information led to other organizations, agencies, museums, archives, etc. within the area, it was possible to also visit and do further research. This option provided a much more timely method of researching.

Genealogy has evolved considerably with the advent of the personal computer. Now, one can travel the world, visit museums and historical sites, communicate with organizations virtually, as well as doing research using free and paid sites online. The immediacy and flexibility of researching genealogy is something to be marveled at.

How was this possible?

This evolution started with passionate and dedicated volunteers and individuals who began transcribing physical records, collecting photos and images of documents, and placing them in online archives, databases and in specialty archive sites. For the most part, these resources were free and available to everyone.

With some sadness, I have watched a major shift take place in the short time since I began. As the popularity of genealogy became evident, commercial sites and paid services suddenly appeared online – the most noted of which being Ancestry.com .

Barker, William Sr. - Accused in Salem Witch Trials
Barker, William Sr. – Accused in Salem Witch Trials

It was still possible to find considerable free information and resources online, but those who had the funds and wanted to save time and effort could pay for subscriptions to make their search easier. Those of us with limited funds began setting up our own sites posting tips and information for other genealogists.

The newest shift I’ve been seeing is the trend for paid services and sites to ‘buy out’ free resources and add them to their paid catalog, leaving paid sites as the only option.

I still consider genealogy as a historical ‘treasure hunt’, one which I pursue with great effort and pleasure. I love nothing better than to discover an obscure site offering valuable information and this blog has provided the venue for me to post this information and assist others.

All links I find to valuable sites can be found in the ‘Genealogy Links’ tab above. Another update with dozens of new links will be completed soon.

Ambler, Joseph and Williams, Ann Wedding Certificate. Let's all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.
Ambler, Joseph and Williams, Ann Wedding Certificate.  Let’s all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.

I think it is important for us to try and preserve the free resources that remain, and possibly add new ones. This is only possible through the efforts of volunteers and the willingness of those of us researching to share information for free. I have made all information from my research available in the ‘Blythe Database’ in the tab above, including sources. Unfortunately, in order to include photos and images, I would have to start my own server. I do wish I could though, because the gold in the genealogy treasure for me has always been photos and images of documents, etc. I will say, though, that the images in my articles are either owned by me, credited to the rightful owner or under free commons license (credit requirements). Feel free to use any images on my site, but please be sure to include the photo credit. A credit to this site on the ones I own (uncredited) would be appreciated.

How can we all help to encourage and preserve free information?

Here are just a few ideas.

  • Start a website of your own and freely post any information you are willing to share.
  • Donate physical items to genealogical and historical societies, museums, libraries and archives that provide free services to the field.
  • Start a newsletter or contribute to existing newsletters to collect and provide information to other researchers.
  • Offer your services to anyone researching in your area through services such as RAOGK (Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness), which has since shut down indefinitely due to the illness and death of its Administrator, Bridgett Schneider.
  • Volunteer in ways to add to or improve what is available. Examples include transcription of documents, taking and submitting photographs of historical and/or genealogical importance, voluntary work at a location providing free services and resources, and conducting and documenting interviews for first hand accounts.

I am still actively pursuing my research and operating my sites, Empty Nest Ancestry and Blythe Genealogy. All data I’ve accumulated, including images, documents, links and sources is available for free access and download on Blythe Genealogy. Feel free to check it out by searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the upper drop down menu.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

If you have new information of relevance to genealogy, or are willing to volunteer your services to provide research in your area on behalf of others and would like to spread the word about your own efforts in this regard, or just plain news of interest, please let me know and I’d be glad to post it here.

Guest posts are welcomed but are subject to Editor review and may not be accepted. If accepted, the author will be given credit for the article and can include two nofollow links.

Please consider making information you have available to others in any way possible and for as little cost as possible and volunteer and/or donate to those who do if you can. Let’s keep our voluntary and free networks operating and providing for researchers in the future.


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Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

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The first consideration when starting to research your genealogy is creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

 

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.
The importance of creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.

I have been a computer user from the day of the old single-use word processors. Therefore, I tend to digitize everything into my own digital library of valuables from family photos, tax documents, bills, bank records, correspondence – and of course, genealogy records, genealogy databases and data.

I’m not a novice. I’m well aware of the pitfalls of relying on a digital library, but I’m as guilty as the next person for procrastination and rationalization.

When it comes to doing the tasks necessary to ensure my genealogy records are secure and permanent, I tend to think, “It’s OK, I’ll do it later.”

There are, however, some very serious pitfalls of putting these things off.

Some of the compelling reasons for digitizing records include:

  • Immediacy of sending genealogy records digitally over the internet.
  • Ease of organization, storage, searching and reproduction.
  • Ability to share family genealogy records between yourself and others.
  • Retain genealogy records in condition at the time of scanning to safeguard against the inevitable ravages of time on physical documents, etc.
  • More and more genealogy records are “born-digital”, never having been in physical form at all.

The digital backup we are used to is not sufficient to safeguard and archive records. The process required includes:

  • Storing with background, technical and descriptive information.
  • Storing records in several locations.
  • Archiving for a very lengthy period of time.
  • Saving genealogy data at a very high resolution.
  • Periodically backing up stored genealogy records to new media to prevent loss of data.
  • Converting file formats and media to new ones to avoid obsolescence.
  • Ensuring access to the digital genealogy records collection.

For my own digital archive storage, I am using a 1 terabyte hard drive and save all important genealogy documents and photos to it. If my sum total of research at this point wasn’t as large as it is, I would use the ‘cloud’ as a backup. But there are limits to the quantity of data it will hold.

All of my original genealogy files and data are on my computer.

I also transfer the files periodically to a new backup using the newest technology and format.

I don’t believe in using CDs, DVDs or even flash drives for permanent storage at all as I’ve had too many fail.

photo credit: Sean MacEntee via photopin cc


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Transcription: Civil War Letters of Private David Coon (1824-1864)

Transcription: Civil War Letters of Private David Coon (1824-1864)

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Transcription of the final pages of this extensive project of the Civil War Letters of Private David Coon was completed April 10, 2013.

 

David Coon and Mary Ann Adams circa 1843.
David Coon with his wife Mary Ann Adams in about 1843.

Page 1…

FOREWORD.

The following letters, written by David Coon to his wife and children, are here collected, carefully copied from the originals. Many of the letters were written on such scraps of paper as were available, the ink being often very poor — in one instance at least, made from the juice of pokeberries gathered on the battlefield, — so that they have become greatly faded by the lapse of time, and a number are quite difficult to decipher.

David Coon enlistment record.
David Coon enlistment record.

It is desired in this way to preserve for his children and grand-children, the letters, giving in a simple and direct way, some of the experiences of a private soldier through a por-tion of one of the greatest campaigns of the Civil War.

Dedication to E. D. Matthews on Coon Letters
This is the dedication to E. D. Matthews on the first page of the transcription of David Coon’s letters by John, David’s son and E. D. Matthews’ brother.

David Coon enlisted from Green Lake County Feb. 26, 1864, in Co. A, 35th Wisconsin infantry. With his regiment he remained at Camp Randall until May 10, when he was ordered to join Hancock’s Corps in Virginia, participating in many of the great battles of that terrible campaign until Aug. 25, 1864, when he, with nearly the whole regiment, was captured at the battle of Ream’s Station. He was taken first to Libby prison, Richmond, and afterward transferred to Salisbury, N. C., where he died Nov. 2, 1864.

David Coon was a good man, a kind husband and father, a true soldier of the American type, not only a patriot but a philosopher.

In loving remembrance these words are penned by his son,

John W. Coon, M. D.

Wales, Wis., July 16, 1913.

 

Page 2…

GRAND ARMY CORNER.

By H. W. Hood.

(From the Madison Democrat, January 12th, 1913.)

THE THIRTY-SIXTH WISCONSIN.

 

A goodly number of survivors of the 36th Wisconsin infantry are dwelling upon the Pacific Coast. They hold reunions from time to time, and it goes without saying that they heartily enjoy themselves when together.

In August, of 1903, when the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic was held at San Francisco, several members of the regiment from east of the Rocky Mountains were in attendance, and on the 18th day of the month they met with their comrades of the coast, and then had an unusually good time together. At that meeting Colonel C. E. Warner, of Windsor, was chosen President and James M. Aubery, secretary. Aubery enlisted February 29, 1864, in Company G of the 36th, and was, September 1, ’64, promoted to the position of sergeant major of the regiment. November 1, same year, he was made quartermaster sergeant, and on the 15th of June, 1865, was commissioned second lieutenant of Company G, but was not mustered as such. In the year 1900, he published a history of the service of his regiment, — a book containing 430 pages. It has about it many excellent features, and is good reading. It would be a good thing if every regiment could have had so able a historian.

On the occasion of this reunion, there were present,

 

Page 3…

Colonel Warner, wife and daughter; Captain Austin Cannon, Company H, who came from Pennsylvania; Charles A. Storke, Company G, of Santa Barbara, daughter and son-in-law; Judge James Paris, Company H, and wife, of Long Beach; A. T. Large, Company D, Los Angeles; William Patton, Company H, Berkeley; William Bright, Company I, Santa Cruz; David Kribs, Company I, and wife; Frederick Jennings, Company H, Lamorie; J. W. Thomas, Company K, and wife, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin; George Clark, Coimpany B, Midway; James LeTellier, Company C; W. S. Hengy, Company B., and wife, Oroville; James M Aubery and two daughters, Los Angeles; Mrs. Skeels, Menomonie, Wisconsin; E. M. Chamberlain, Company D, and wife, Albany, Wisconsin.

After a season spent in reminiscences and renewing their ancient comradeship, they sat down to a feast — twenty-eight of them — given by Comrade Large. The spread before them made it plain that their host was not only Large by name, but of heart. They had a jolly time of it.

On the 12th of last September several of those old badgers gathered again at table, at Los Angeles, Comrade Storke being the genial host. He was chosen chairman of the meeting and Comrade Aubery, secretary. On that occasion there were present, Comrades Storke, Aubery, Clarke and wife, Jennings, Parish, and Large, of those mentioned above; also F. A. Wilde, Company F, Kingman, Arizona; Robert Moorhouse, Company G, Heber, California; J. V. Bartow, Company G, Long Beach; Edward Parish, Company H, Los Angeles, wife and daughter; Captain Wesley S. Potter, Company D,

 

Page 4…

Pasadena; George W. Raymer, Company D, Madison, Wisconsin; Benjamin Bailey, Company A, San Diego.

I have been looking over the records to see how the comrades named above fared in their term of service of a year and a third. Colonel Warner was so wounded at the battle of Deep Bottom, Virginia, August 14, ’64, that it was necessary to amputate his left arm. Chales A. Storke was taken prisoner at Cold Harbor, June 1, ’64. W. H. Patton was wounded at Petersburg, June 18, 1864. William Bright was wounded at the same place, same day. David Kribe was taken prisoner at Ream’s Station. Frederick Jennings was wounded in the battle at Petersburg, June 18, ’64, J. W. Thomas was wounded at Petersburg, George Clarke was sun-struck July 14, ’64, Edward Parish was wounded June 18, ’64, at Petersburg, F. A. Wilde was taken prisoner June 1, ’64, at Cold Harbor, Robert Moorhouse was taken prisoner the same day, George W. Raymer was wounded near Petersburg, June 18, ’64.

The Thirty-sixth was recruited under President Lincoln’s call, February 1, 1864, for 500,000 men. It was quickly recruited at Camp Randall to the maximum number under direction of Colonel Frank A. Haskell, who had been adjutant of the 6th Wisconsin. He was commissioned colonel on the 23d of March. The regiment left Camp Randall on the 10th of May and was in Washington on the 14th. It served till the close of the war in the first brigade, second division, second army corps.

This is a brief sketch of the service of the regiment:

 

Page 5…

It was at Spottsylvania May 18-21, North Anna river May 23-26, Totopotomy May 28-31, Bethesda Church June 1, Cold Harbor June 1-12, before Petersburg June 16-18. It was in the siege of Petersburg from June 16, ’64 to April 2, 1865. In the meantime it was on the Weldon railroad June 22-23, demonstration north of James river at Deep Bottom August 13-20, where Colonel Warner lost his left arm, Ream’s Station August 25, Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run, October 17-28, Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865, Watkin’s House March 25. It was in the movement, March 28-April 9, that terminated in the surrender of General Lee. On the second day of May it started for Washington, where, on the 23d of that month, it marched in the Grand Review that was the formal close of the war. On the 17th day of June the regiment left Washington for Louisville, Kentucky, going into camp on the north side of the river, at Jeffersonville, Indiana. There on the 12th of July it was mustered out of the service and started for Madison, where it arrived on the 14th, and was disbanded on the 24th.

Colonel Haskell was killed at Cold Harbor June 3, ’64, and Colonel John A. Savage, who succeeded Haskell, died July 4, ’64, of wounds received June 18, at Petersburg. Colonel Harvey M. Brown, of Columbus, who succeeded Savage, was, because of wounds received June 18, discharged October 27, ’64. He was succeeded by Colonel Warner.

No other Wisconsin regiment lost so many men during a corresponding term of service as the Thirty-sixth. The original

 

Page 6…

Strength of the regiment was 990. It received twenty-four recruits, making in all, 1,014. Of these, 156 were killed in action or died of wounds, 172 died of disease and 12 of accidents, — making a total loss of 340, or 43-1/3 per cent. Of all who enlisted in the regiment.

I am taking these figures from the report of the adjutant general of the state in 1866. Comrade Aubery, in his history of the regiment, makes his figures a little different. Abuery says that during the first two months of the real campaigning of the regiment there were losses as follows: 273 killed and wounded— averaging 34 every week, five a day; 61 killed outright— eight a week, one a day; 221 wounded— 26 ½ a week, nearly four a day; 336 killed, wounded and prisoners— 42 every week, six a day. At the charge of Cold Harbor there were 17 killed and 53 wounded in about the time it takes to tell it. At Bethesda Church there were killed, in the charge, 49, wounded, 79.

The Thirty-sixth was one of the hardest fighting regiments of all in the service from all of the states and its losses were among the greatest. Every survivor feels proud of having been a member of it.

 

Page 7…

Camp Randall, Madison, Reb. 28th, 1864.

Dear Wife and Children:-

Well, I didn’t go back to bid you good-bye. I found it necessary when I got to Berlin to come right on to this place in order to get in in time to make arrangements to secure my bounty, &c. I have enlisted in the 36th regiment, and yesterday was taken into a room with nine others and stripped naked, and passed examination so slick that there wouldn’t have been any chance at all of getting clear if I had been drafted, but Orange Snell was thrown out, the last man I should have thought of.

Tomorrow we are to be mustered in. We expect our company will be “A”, as it is the first one of all. Messs. Vergin, Putnam, Dewey, Wm. Luckey, Gordon and Mart Haskill are all in the same company; all accepted but the two last, their case is not decided yet. Luckey is my bunk partner. Thos. And Jess Brown are in the same reg. but another Co. We are in Luman’s quarters to-day, as there was no good chance for writing in the barrack. Palen and Sol. Reynolds go into the 18th Colts Co. Little Lester Stephens goes into the 16th.

Now about the pay and bounty. I expect $165 local bounty, which I think we had better pay for the sugar bush, 40, and all of our other debts, and you will get $5.00 a month from the state, and I think I can send home $5.000 a month more; and I hope Herbert will be able to raise your own provisions and some to spare. Plant an acre of beans, and Emma must help hoe them and work in the garden, &c.,

 

Page 8…

and do the best you can, all of you.

The Government bounty I want to have salted down, so that it will keep. I got 44 brooms and sold at $2.00 per doz. Poor little things. Got the things you sent for and left them at L. A.’s. I wish you had them. I had a chance to get the brooms and myself bro’t down to Berlin, and did not get a chance to go to see Hiram and Dennis, and I have thought that it was best perhaps that I should have left the way I did, as it spared us all the pain of parting that we should have experienced had I not expected to return before my final departure. Herbert, I expect Mr. Dunlap will send for a hundred buckets, and I want you to tighten the hoops and let him have as good as there is. I have been thinking that we are a good deal better off than the rest in the neighborhood that have left, in having a team and a boy old enough to use it and take care of things, and I hope you will succeed and take good care of things. I must close for this time, hoping to write again in a few days when we get a little settled. You needn’t write until I write again.

Your affectionate husband and father,

D. Coon.

P.S. – Herbert, try and get Mr. Locke to take that lumber to Berlin if he is going, so that he can to to Brushes, and get that, and the rest from Poysippi.

 

Page 9…

Camp Randall, March 2, 1864.

Dear Wife and Children:

Well, we were mustered into Uncle Sam’s service yesterday, and here we are tight, to-day not allowed to go out of camp, and we can’t go out any day without a pass from headquarters, and the orders are not to give any of us a pass to-day. There was several hundred left camp yesterday for Dixie for the old regiment.

Now I will give you a history of the time I had about my local bounty. There was a man from Green Lake town on the care that wanted a few men for their town to fill their quota. They offered $200.00, to be deposited in the bank at Ripon by the first of April. He took my name for one, but found on getting here that he didn’t want me, so I engaged to another man for $165 cash down, but found afterwards that he didn’t take down my name, and got the number he wanted without me, so I was out again and the bounties were falling. I then heard that my Green Lake man’s men hadn’t all come on and he still wanted more. I then went to him (I knew where he put up) Monday morning engaged to him, making the thing sure this time. That same afternoon I saw the Captain. He told me that he had done the best for me, got me into some town for $150.00 cash down. I told him I didn’t want to be credited to that town, I had made other arrangements, that I couldn’t afford to lose $50.00. He said they had to make out the muster roll in order to muster us in and they couldn’t make out the roll without crediting us to some town and that was the best chance they could find, and when the roll was made out they couldn’t be altered, &c.

 

Page 10…

I gave them to understand that I wasn’t satisfied, so they concluded to make out a new muster roll and put me into Green Lake, and so it is at last.

Joe Howard, Wormwood, his boy, T. L. Hall and Jesse Brown was all thrown out on examination. Paln, J. Snell, Cross, Sol. Reynolds not mustered in yet. L. A. gave me an empty housewife. If we should stay a good while here we may get a chance to come home, but it is doubtful. I can’t think of the name of the place where that cousin Margaret lives. Please tell me. As I couldn’t get out to get writing materials I borrowed what I could get, but such a place to write, playing cards, swearing and all sorts, but I am thankful that all are not of that kind. I attended the best prayer and conference meeting last night that I have attended in the state. A Miss Hobart is lecturing in camp on temperance, &c. She is to lecture tonight. I wish you would write as soon as you can. You may expect a letter from me as often as once a week while we stay here. I must stop. Kiss the babies for pa. Herbert had better let Chas. Have that calf skin towards the shoes, if he will take it.

Yours affectionately,

D. Coon.

P. S. – Direct Co. A. 36 Reg., Campb Randall, Madison.


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David Coon: A Civil War story… and tragedy.

David Coon: A Civil War story… and tragedy.

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I spent a great deal of time transcribing the typewritten copies of handwritten letters of David Coon to his wife and children from Confederate prison, marking the days until his subsequent death from disease. The original transcriptions were completed by his son, Dr. William B. Coon in 1913, one for each family member. My father-in-law now holds one of the transcribed sets of letters.

 

David Coon and Mary Ann Adams
David and Mary Ann (Adams) Coon

David Coon, born February 10, 1824 in Beekmantown, Clinton County, New York, was the son of William B. Coon and Clarissa Haskel Williams. David Coon was the 4th great grandfather of my children on their father’s side by adoption.

My husband’s father-in-law, Marshall Matthews Blythe was the son of Louise Matthews, who was adopted by Dennis William Matthews, son of Elam Dennis Matthews and grandson of David Coon.

On June 15, 1843, David married his first wife, Mary Ann Adams, daughter of Alanson Adams and Submit Hall, in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont. In subsequent years, they had seven children: Alonzo Beckwith Coon, Edgar Coon, Herbert William Coon, Emma E. Coon, Hiram Southwick Coon, Elam Dennis Coon and Orilla (Mary) Coon. Mary Ann died June 3, 1859.

Between 1843 and June of 1844, he was living in Licking County, Ohio and in 1844, started a wagon making business with his brother-in-law Elam Dennis Adams. He is shown in records of November 27, 1854 in Waushara County, Wisconsin, living on 40 acres of military bounty land at the SE Quarter of NW Quarter of Section 12, Township 19. He is recorded in the 1860 census for Bloomfield, Waushara County, Wisconsin, farming his land.

David married his second wife, Isabel Ann Hall, daughter of Benjamin Hall and Eliza McReynolds on November 24, 1859 in Leon, Waushara County, Wisconsin. They added to the family with three more children: John Williams Coon, Matthew Edgar Coon and Jedidah Wood Coon. Isabel Ann was the cousin of David’s first wife Mary Ann as Benjamin and Submit were brother and sister, both children of John Hall and his wife Submit.

John Williams Coon, MD
John Williams Coon, MD

Assuming that the responsibilities of caring for such a large family as a widower were too much for David after the death of Mary Ann, the younger children went to other families. Elam Dennis went to the Matthew’s family, who later adopted him. He took the last name Matthews. Orilla went to live with a family named Ellis, who later adopted her, and Hiram lived with a different Matthews family (although related to the family who took Elam) but later returned to live with his father and his father’s new wife, Isabel.

Leaving his farm close to Bloomingfield in Waushara County and proceeding to Berlin to enlist in the army, he was told he had to leave right away to proceed to Madison. His departure for camp Randall was so quick, he did not have time to go back and tell his family he was leaving. They only found out in a letter dated February 28, 1864 that he “…enlisted in the 36th Regiment.” David enlisted in the Union army from Green Lake County on February 26, 1864 and served as a Private in Co. A, 36th Wisconsin Infantry, and is recorded on his military documents dated August 15, 1861 as being 5 feet, 8 3/8 inches in height with blue eyes and sandy hair. The following is an excerpt from the foreward of the original typed transcription of David Coon Letters, prepared in 1913 in Wales, Wisconsin by his son, John W. Coon, MD.

“David Coon was a great man, a kind husband and father, a true soldier of the American type, not only a patriot but a philosopher.” During his service in the Civil War, David wrote frequently and consistently, approximately one letter per week, to his wife and children, his devotion to all being very evident. Even if he did not have any stationary to write on he made sure they knew he was okay. He once wrote a letter on the label of a condensed milk can. As described by his son John W. Coon, MD in the typed transcription he prepared of his father’s letter home, “Many of the letters were written on such scraps of paper as were available, the ink being often very poor — in one instance at least, made from the juice of pokeberries gathered on the battlefield.”

Forest Cemetery, Stephens Point, Portage County, Wisconsin
Forest Cemetery, Stephens Point, Portage County, WisconsinSources

David was stationed with his regiment at Camp Randall until May 10, 1864, where he nursed the sick at the hospital before being sent to battle. He was then ordered to join Hancock’s Corps in Virginia where he participated in many of the noted great battles of that campaign.On May 8, 1864, he sent a letter to his family telling them that he was to be sent away to Washington to join General Grant’s Army.The regiment moved from battle to battle. They hardly ever had time to rest. During a battle, Coon was captured by a Confederate officer and was handcuffed for two hours. The officer let him go with a note of warning. Coon wrote to his family, “He offered to let me go back to the regiment but wanted me to promise to be a better boy.”Not until August did the regiment start to travel again. They went to Richmond where they fought against the rebels. When they finished they returned to their camp near Petersburg. On August 25, 1864, he, along with 11 officers and 175 other men from the regiment, posted themselves at Reams Station on the Weldon Railroad. Before long, he, along with 133 other men from his regiment were reported missing. On August 27, Coon wrote a letter to his family telling them that he and 127 other men had been captured and taken prisoner. He talked about how the officers and guards had treated them fairly until then and he wrote that he was expecting to be sent to Libby Prison in Richmond and for his family to keep up courage. That was his last letter. He was first held in Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia, then at Belle Isle, later being transferred again to Salisbury Prison in North Carolina.

Salisbury Prison was one of the best Confederate prisons. However, soon after David and the other men arrived, the conditions grew worse. The prison became over crowded with 10,000 people in a space that had reached capacity one year before Coon arrived. Living in these terribly overcrowded conditions, one third of the prisoners, or 35,000 men, died. David Coon was one of these. The diary of James Canon, a Sergeant in the same company, states in a simple entry dated November 2, 1864, “David Coon died today.” He was buried the same day in Forest Cemetery at Stephens Point, Portage County, Wisconsin.

Souces:

  1. Matthews, Dennis, 1910 US Census, Louisa County, Iowa.
  2. Coon, David, 1860 US Census, Bloomfield, Waushara County, Wisconsin; Ancestry.com .
  3. David Coon and Family tombstone, Stevens Point Cemetery, Wisconsin.
  4. Emily Bailey, “David Coon and Family Background,” e-mail message from < [email protected]> to Christine Blythe, 19 Nov 2006.
  5. Emily Bailey, “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message from <[email protected] aol.com> to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  6. Military Bounty Land Warrant – David Coon – 27 Nov 1854.
  7. Act of Sept. 28 1850 Land Warrant Card – Coon, W.B. and Coon, David.
  8. Military Bounty Land Location Record.
  9. Military Bounty Land Warrant Certificate – Coon, William B.
  10. David Coon, “Hiram Coon Biographical Information,” e-mail message from < [email protected]> to Christine Blythe, 21 Nov 2006.
  11. Widow’s Declaration of Pension – Isabel Ann Coon (5 M ar 1865).
  12. Statement of Pension Claim of Nathan H. Matthews (16 Mar 1870).
  13. Coon, David, death certificate no. Widow’s Claim to Pension – Emma and Hiram Coon (1864).
  14. Sworn Statement re Matthew Coon’s Birth, compiler, (27 Feb 1867).
  15. Statement re David Coon’s Children.
  16. Claim for Increase of Widow’s Pension – Coon, Isabel – 22 Aug 1865 (22 Aug 1865).
  17. Widow’s Pension Statement – Isabel A. Coon (15 Se p 1893).
  18. Notice of Death of Isabel Coon to Pension Agent.
  19. Wisconsin Civil War Volunteers Roster – C (Coon), Wisconsin Historical Museum online
  20. Claim for Widow’s Pension – Isabel A. Coon (1865).
  21. Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams (31 Mar 1869 ).
  22. Statement of Isabel Coon re Custody of Children (4 M ay 1870).
  23. Sworn Statement of Isabel A. Coon re Orilla Coon (2 8 Jun 1869).
  24. Statement of Minister re Marriage of David and Isabel Coon (24 Mar 1875).
  25. Statement of Clerk re Missing Marriage Record of David Coon (8 Apr).
  26. 1850 OH, Licking, Alexandria, M432_702, Page 170 Dwelling 66, Family 68
  27. http://web.archive.org/web/20000601082635/http://madison.k12.wi.u s/wright/civilwar/36regmet.

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The UK National Archives’ site “The Cabinet Papers”: UK government history.

The UK National Archives’ site “The Cabinet Papers”: UK government history.

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Flag of UKWhat is available to researchers on “The Cabinet Papers” site?

Records from 1915 to 1982 including full text is searchable from this site. Some of these records, however, have been redacted under the Public Records Act.

These records include:

  • Decisions and discussions of cabinet.
  • Background reports and papers provided for cabinet ministers before cabinet meetings.
  • Handwritten notebooks of the Cabinet Secretary. Only those after 1941 survive.
  • Publications that describe the Cabinet office and procedures.

Records of the various committees and associated bodies including the Chiefs of Staff Committee are not digitized. It is possible to discover topics of discussion through diaries, memoirs and correspondence of those holding positions within and involved in government.

Digitisation of Cabinet secretaries’ notebooks are in progress, while those prior to March 1964 are already available and searchable.

There is a 30 year rule in place, during which Cabinet records remain unavailable to the public, resulting in conclusions and memoranda for Cabinet meetings of 1978 to 1982 have been made available and searchable online.

Links to relevant topics are:

Other features of this site include:

Studies

Government

Writing Frame

Historical Maps


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Awesome links for genealogy and family tree research in Canada.

Awesome links for genealogy and family tree research in Canada.

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I love Canada and I’m proud to be Canadian.

 

But…

 

I learned very quickly when I started researching, that Canadian genealogical data available online can be sporadic and difficult to find.

 

Because genealogy research in Canada can be problematic, this post lists ‘awesome’ links for genealogy and family tree research in Canada.

 

Upper Canada governmentIn the beginning, I literally spent hours online searching key phrases and keywords looking for information and the results were disappointing. Most of these sites are not optimized for search engines and one must dig through a lot of dirt to find the ‘gems’ – and there are some gems.

Once I found great sites for Canadian family genealogy research, I made a point of saving them to my ‘favourites’ and quickly built up quite a list of valuable links related to my own research.

Here are the best sites for Canadian genealogy research that I have found with some background information and tips and hints. I feel that these ten links provided 90% of the verifiable data I obtained regarding Canadian ancestors.

  1. Archives of Canada – Although this site can be confusing and difficult to navigate, it’s well worth the time and effort. There is a wealth of information available here. My advice? Think of it as a genealogical treasure hunt and explore every link you come across that may be relevant to your research. Be sure to bookmark and/or record the ones you find valuable as it can be very difficult to find them again later. To get you started here are my favourite links within the archives collection:
  2. Automated Genealogy – This site provides detailed and proofed transcriptions of the Canadian Censuses as well as links to other genealogy projects.
  3. Veterans’ Affairs Canada – Records and Collections – This collection includes the Books of Remembrance; the Canadian Virtual War Memorial; and Diaries, Letters and Stories.
  4. Commonwealth War Graves Commission – This site is for research of Commonwealth soldiers and veterans who died during wars.
  5. Dictionary of Canadian Biography – Great dictionary of biographies of prominent and noted Canadians.
  6. Rootsweb – A global collaborative site of user input data, family genealogy histories, documents and information.
    • Message Boards – Canada
  7. Canada GenWeb
  8. Cyndi’s List – This site leads you through numerous links to resources for Canadian genealogy research.
  9. Olive Tree Genealogy – The Canadian section of this site contains numerous links for Canadian genealogy research – some of them being quite obscure and valuable.
  10. Familysearch.org – A free site from the LDS that has improved substantially over the past few years, making available original documents, transcriptions, etc.
  11. Ancestry.ca – A paid site that is well worth the money to attempt to fill in the gaps not filled by using the free resources and sites available.
    • Drouin Collection – French Canadian collection of parish and church records from 1608 to 1935.

 

The following is my complete list of sites for Canadian research.

 

Association, Organization or Society

Culture

Location

Genealogy Sites

History

Military

Record Types

 


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Time capsule of 1795: Placed by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams?

Time capsule of 1795: Placed by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams?

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A time capsule of 1795 has been discovered in the Massachusetts Statehouse while the water system was being worked on.
A time capsule of 1795 has been discovered
A time capsule of 1795 has been discovered in the Massachusetts Statehouse while the water system was being worked on.

Removed from the granite cornerstone, it is believed the capsule was placed by Samuel Adams, Governor of Massachusetts, Paul Revere and others at the beginning of construction of the Statehouse during the Revolutionary War period..

It is believed it may hold newspapers and coins, and is known to contain a Paul Revere plate and papers from the 17th century, among other items.

The condition of the capsule, which was originally made of cowhide, is not known and there may have been some deterioration. More will be known when the contents are revealed next week. It is planned to xray the capsule prior to its opening.

This same time capsule had been removed previously in the mid-1800’s and the contents placed in a copper box. Extra precautions were taken at the time to ensure good condition in future.

As soon as it was discovered, museum curator Pamela Hatchfield was called in. She has been systematically chiseling at the cornerstone to free the box, the process taking several hours.

The time capsule will be returned to the site next year.

In October of this year, another time capsule dating to 1901 was discovered in the Old State House, the first seat of government for the state. It had been placed in a lion statue on top of the building and held newspaper clippings, a letter from the journalists of the time, and a book on foreign policy.

It has not yet been decided whether to reinstate the box as is or whether new items will be added when reburied.

The 1901 time capsule items are currently on display at the Statehouse.

photo credit: Boston Public Library via photopin cc


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Transcription – Civil War letters of Pte. David Coon now completed.

Transcription – Civil War letters of Pte. David Coon now completed.

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I’m very happy to say I have finally completed the transcription of the 100+ pages of letters from Pte. David Coon to his family during his time of service and his capture and imprisonment by Confederate forces in Libby Prison and then Salsbury Prison, where he died late in 1864.

I do apologize for taking so long, but it was a great deal of work and had to be done when I could find time amid my responsibilities updating and maintaining my four blogs and my daily responsibilities as a wife and mother of two young adults.

I have divided the transcription into individual website pages containing 10 pages of letters each. The pages can be easily scrolled through using the page navigation links at the bottom of each web page.

This is a treasured artifact of our family. We do not hold the original letters, but we do have an original typed transcription of the letters completed in 1913 (interestingly enough, 100 years old as of this year) by David’s son Dr. John W. Coon.

My Signature


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Ancestry.com Offers a New Beta Image Viewer

Ancestry.com Offers a New Beta Image Viewer

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Beta Image  ViewerOne big problem I’ve noticed with the image viewer at Ancestry.com in the past was that it was rigid. There was no flexibility of movement. Scrolling, namely zeroing in on one key point in a document that was larger than the monitor screen was difficult. I was forced to switch between the horizontal and vertical scroll bars to focus on specific parts of the document.

This new beta image viewer at Ancestry.com is a huge improvement, although there is still room for further improvement.

This image viewer allows flexible scrolling using the ‘grasping hand’ cursor we’re all used to. Just place the cursor on the part of the document you want, and move it to where you want. It’s that easy!

The negative I’ve noticed is that the scroll feature is slow and not at all smooth. It feels almost like you have to stop and wait for the image to catch up with you. It’s necessary to slow your movements down to accommodate the speed limitations of the viewer.

The bottom line is that the improvements in this beta image viewer are going to make all of our lives easier, but I eagerly look forward to more improvements in the future, please!!


photo credit: shawe_ewahs


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

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FamilySearch.org andAncestry.com Updates and Additions” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Archer-William-November-9-1814-Virginia-Patriot-Richmond-VA-Page-4.pdf-2014-04-02-10-54-022.png” alt=”FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions” width=”261″ height=”212″ /> Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

 

FamilySearch.org

Italy, Catania, Caltagirone, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1861-1941

Russia, Nizhni Novgorod Poll Tax Census (Revision Lists), 1782-1858

South Africa, Orange Free State, Estate Files, 1951-2006

Spain, Cádiz, Testaments, 1531-1920

Georgia, Probate Records, 1742-1990

Maine, State Archive Collections, 1718-1957

Missouri, Cole County Circuit Court Case Files, 1820-1926

Montana, Big Horn, County Records, 1884-2011

Nevada, Marriage Index, 1956-2005

 

Ancestry.com

Michigan, Genesee County, Marriage Index, 1836-1934

Michigan, Kalamazoo County, Riverside Cemetery Index

Michigan, Monroe County, Obituary Index,1821-2012

Michigan, Western Michigan Newspapers, Marriage Index, 1959-2011

Oklahoma, Oklahoma County, Marriage Index, 1889-1951

U.S., Dawes Commission Index (overturned), 1896

U.S., Index to General Correspondence of the Record and Pension Office, 1889-1904


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The Gift of Family History

The Gift of Family History

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If you have a genealogy buff on your Christmas list, you’re one lucky person – give them the gift of Family History!

No sitting for hours scratching your head, trying to figure out what to get them for Christmas!

The best gift anyone can give to a genealogist is a gift membership to Ancestry.com or Ancestry.ca or Ancestry.uk, and so on, and so on…

You can ask anyone into genealogy what tool they use and value the most and I promise that the vast majority will say ‘Ancestry.whatever‘ online.

Purchasing the gift membership is easy. Just click on the ‘Gift Membership’ button at the top of the site’s page; select the membership, length and start date; and enter the recipient’s email.

Ancestry.com sends a link to gift cards you can print for under the tree. The recipient receives an email on the start date of the membership.

I just wish one of those on my gift list was a genealogy buff. Life would be so much easier.

photo credit: mysza831


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – August 11, 2013

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – August 11, 2013

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Stone-Ann-Will.jpg” alt=”Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” width=”379″ height=”375″ />Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

 

FamilySearch.org

England

Korea

New Zealand

Sweden

United States

 

Ancestry.com

Canada

Hungary

Poland

Romania

Russia

Serbia

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

 


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Transcription: Civil War Letters of Private David Coon (1824-1864) – In Progress

Transcription: Civil War Letters of Private David Coon (1824-1864) – In Progress

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David Coon and Mary Ann Adams circa 1843.
David Coon with his wife Mary Ann Adams in about 1843.

First, I must apologize for taking so long to get back to this transcription project, because it’s been over a month since the last batch of pages was transcribed.

Today I posted the transcription of pages 100 to 110. This is the second to last batch.

The next will be pages 111 to 121 and will complete the project. Yeah!

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

(Although all effort has been made to transcribe these ‘error free’, I am only human and errors can and will be made. It is advisable to always use the primary source as your basis for entering data in your genealogy. I transcribe these documents in order for them to be searchable. You will never find a document transcribed for which there is no original image in my database. Individuals who appear in my database are linked.)

 

 

 


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The best gifts for genealogists during a cash-strapped holiday season.

The best gifts for genealogists during a cash-strapped holiday season.

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For my recommended Christmas gifts for genealogists list for 2013, I thought I’d concentrate on more obscure, lower cost gifts. Some could even be used as stocking stuffers. Last year’s list was for higher end, higher priced, technically focused gifts for genealogists. So, for this year, I’ve come up with a list of lower priced gifts suitable for anyone interested in genealogy in any way, even if they’re tentative amateurs or are just exploring the possibilities without wanting to make a large financial investment in the beginning.

 

HumorMug - My family tree is  full of nuts.

  • First of all, when in doubt, inject a little humor in your gift giving. It’s well appreciated, especially by those of us who chase dead people, frequent graveyards, and dig through musty libraries and archives. One example is the Mug Full of Nuts on the cafepress.com website.
  • The Book of Bad Baby NamesThe book of Bad Baby Names would be a wonderfully funny, almost unbelievable gift for the genealogist. The authors have scoured old records, censuses, etc. to find the most unusual, unfortunate and just plain funny names given in the past.

 

ToolsStone Rubbing Kit gift

  • An ideal gift for those of us who are fascinated with graveyards, this Stone Rubbing Kit would be a wonderful and fascinating gift. There are certain important gravestones that I would love to get rubbings of.
  • Magnimark magnifier and bookmarkThis MagniMark 7-1/2″ x 2-1/2″ magnifier and bookmark is ideal because of its portability, ease of use, and the ability to use it as a bookmark within the pages of the old books or documents one might need it for.

 

Gift CardsGoogle ebooks gift card

  • I am always searching historical books and publications on the Google eBooks site. Where the books are free, I download them and use them as I need to. For paid titles, however, I do think twice and a gift card to invest toward the books in my online library would be a welcome gift. It’s important to note, however, that the gift card is a new venture for Google eBooks and may not be available at all outlets yet.
  • Although my entire collection of genealogy research is digital and available within my genealogy software, there are occasions when I like to put something to pen, paper, scissors and glue – such as scrapbooking. Two years ago I created a scrapbook for my in-laws about their ancestors for the previous five generations and the scrapbooking supplies were handy. A gift card for scrapbooking supplies from any store would be welcomed.

 

Magazine Gift SubscriptionsCanada's History Magazine

  • The one thing I always look forward to is my Canada’s History magazine subscription. I’ve been a subscriber since it’s original title was ‘The Beaver’ (Canada’s national animal). I was saddened when I learned that certain racy connotations of the word beaver were influencing and negatively impacting its performance on search engines and a name change was in order. A gift subscription to a history or genealogy magazine would make a great stocking stuffer.

 

Miscellaneous GiftsThe Book of Myself Project

  • I can certainly speak for myself and I’m sure most other genealogists would agree with me that once we start working on our genealogy, our focus is all to the past. “The Book of Myself, A Do-It-Yourself Autobiography in 201 Questions,” by Carl Marshall and David Marshall would be a great exercise in exploring one’s own personal history and documenting it. After all, our present will soon become the past.
  • The “Our Family Tree Tapestry Afghan” would be a wonderful way of honoring history and genealogy through textile and thread. This is one gift that would one day become a family heirloom.

 

Gifts that Only Take a Little Imagination and Effort

  • Heritage Recipes – Either purchase or create a cookbook featuring the recipes of childhood and cultural history. In my case, Acadian and French Canadian recipes would matter the most.
  • Historical Treasure Chest – Create a treasure chest containing copies of everything you can and would like to include that would help the recipient with their genealogy research, including photos, documents, newspaper clippings, publications, etc.

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – January 24, 2013

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – January 24, 2013

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FamilySearch.org

Canada

Canada Census Mortality Schedules, 1871

Canada, Upper Canada Census, 1842

Czech Republic

Czech Republic, Censuses, 1843-1921

Czech Republic, Land Records, 1450-1889

Estonia

Estonia, Population Registers, 1918-1944

Germany

Germany, Westfalen, Minden Citizen Lists, 1574-1902

Peru

Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1995

Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997

Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996

Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890-2005

United States

California, Probate Estate Files,1833-1991

Florida, Key West Passenger Lists, 1898-1920

Louisiana, First Registration Draft Cards, 1940-1945

Maine, State Archive Collections, 1790-1966

Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003

Ohio, Scioto County Recorder 1885-1887

Ohio, Stark County Probate Records, 1886-1921

Oklahoma, Probate Records, 1887-2008

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Passenger Lists, 1883-1945

United States, Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1820-1908

United States, Confederate Navy and Marine Service Records, 1861-1865

United States, Index to General Correspondence of the Pension Office, 1889-1904

United States, Mexican War Index and Service Records, 1846-1848

 

Ancestry.com

Australia

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870

 

Canada

Border Crossings: From Canada to U.S., 1895-1954

Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1801-1928

 

Sweden

Sweden, Church Records, 1500-1941

 

United Kingdom

UK, Civil Divorce Records, 1858-1911

UK, Recommendations for Honours and Awards Index, 1935-1990

 

United States

Alabama, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908

Arkansas, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908

Florida, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908

Hawaii, Honolulu, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1900-1959

Kansas, Naturalization Abstracts, 1864-1972

Kentucky, Naturalization Records, 1906-1991

 

Louisiana, Naturalization Records, 1836-2001

Massachusetts, Boston, Census, 1707

Mayflower Births and Deaths, Vol. 1 and 2

Michigan, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908

Minnesota, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908

Mississippi, Naturalization Records, 1908-1991

New Jersey, Warren County, Obituary Index, 1848-1914

North Carolina, Mecklenburg County, Birth Index, 1865-2012

North Carolina, Naturalization Records, 1872-1996

Ohio, Columbus, Union Cemetery Index, 1847-2012

Ohio, Marriages, 1803-1900

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Marriage Index, 1885-1951

Texas, Divorce Index, 1968-2002

U.S., Citizenship Case Files in Indian Territory, 1896-1897

U.S., County and Regional Histories and Atlases, 1804-1984

U.S., Records of Aliens Pre-Examined in Canada, 1922-1954

 

 

 

 


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Transcription Update – Civil War Letters of Private David Coon

Transcription Update – Civil War Letters of Private David Coon

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I finally got around to transcribing more pages of David Coon’s Civil War letters to home.

Today I added pages 79 to 90, and will hopefully add at least another ten pages in the next week.

Only 23 more pages to go!

 


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familylink.com Database Updates and Additions

familylink.com Database Updates and Additions

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FamilyLink.com databaseFor those of you looking to break down brick walls in your genealogy research, now’s the time to run (don’t walk) to the familylink.com database.

They have just completed a major update of existing databases as well as introducing new ones. The changes encompass over 14,000,000 updated items and over 37,000,000 newly uploaded items.

I have provided a snapshot of the extensive list of titles updated on the familylink.com database site. I have a complete and very large .pdf file of the 29 page catalogue of the database and document updates. Just comment to request a copy with your email address and I will send it to you as soon as possible.

  • Surname genealogies from A-Z
  • Regimental, battle and other histories
  • Canadian Regimental Histories
  • American Decorations: List of Awards of the Congressional Medal of Honor, 1862-1926
  • American Genealogy (1915)
  • Personal autobiographies and histories
  • Historical Magazine and Notes and Queries Concerning the Antiquities, History and Biography of America, Series 1 and 2
  • Romance of Genealogy
  • War of the Rebellion
  • The National Guard
  • Sketches Illustrating the Early Settlement and History of Glengarry in Canada
  • Major Index to Pension List of the War of 1812 (Vol. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6)
  • Memoirs of the Late War, Vol. 1 and 2
  • New Hampshire Genealogical Record (Genealogical Magazine, numerous volumes)
  • Passages From the Life of Henry Warren Howe (diary and letters of the Civil War)
  • Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography (numerous volumes)
  • Virginia Magazine of History and Biography (numerous volumes)
  • Toronto, Hamilton and London, Society Blue Book – 1900
  • History of the County of Bruce – 1906
  • Peace River Country, Canada
  • The Canadian Biographical Dictionary, Ontario – 1880
  • Pioneer Life in Zorra -1899
  • History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)
  • Presbyterian Pioneer Missionaries
  • Shanty, Forest and River Life
  • The Brazier – 1 Apr 1917
  • Patents of Canada from 1824 to 1849
  • Berlin Celebration of Cityhood, 1912
  • Provincial Histories of Canada
  • Business and Professional Directories
  • Inscriptions and Graves
  • Work of the Canadian Archives
  • Diary of a Voyage from Scotland to Canada
  • The Voyages and Discoveries of the Cabots
  • Histories and Documents of Canadian Universities
  • The War of 1812-1815
  • Histories of Canadian Natives and Chiefs
  • Histories of American Indians
  • Church and Clergy Histories
  • Canadian Government Personnel and Histories
  • Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monuments
  • Histories of Government and the Laws
  • History of Abraham Lincoln
  • History of Negro Troops in the War of the Rebellion
  • Lincoln Memorial Collection, Relics of the War of the Rebellion
  • Prisoner of War Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies
  • English Surnames in 1601
  • Westmorland Wills
  • Parish Registers of England and Wales
  • Directories of Society and Titled People
  • County Histories of England
  • Catholic Church Histories of England
  • Academic Registers of England
  • Oliver Cromwell’s Letters and Speeches
  • City Directories
  • Official US Service Records

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