Tag: files

Dates and details: Keep a genealogy resource file.

Dates and details: Keep a genealogy resource file.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

Everyone knows that Portland is in Oregon, don’t they, but what year did that area develop?

 

Did you know that in earlier times, it was in the Oregon Territories?

 

Hmm.

 

And when did Saskatchewan become a province, eh?

 

These details about states, provinces, counties, and other events, can be overwhelming if you try to remember them all.

 

Don’t.

 

keep a genealogy resource file

Start to develop and keep a genealogy resource file; or you could file papers in your family Genealogy folders or create a computer folder in your Genealogy master folder with specific dates and places to keep track of.

For example, you may need to know when your ancestors emigrated into the USA, in order to determine where to research their entry. Although you may think you know a great deal about Ellis Island and immigration, it was used for screening immigrants from these dates only – January 1, 1892 to 1924.

However, during those years over 400,000 immigrants were screened via the Barge Office (at the tip of Manhattan) in 1891 before the official immigration office was opened. Those dates, 1892-1924, would be useful to have in a handy form, wouldn’t they?

Before that time, Castle Garden (Castle Clinton) at the southern tip of Manhattan, NY City, was an immigrant receiving center from August 1,1855 to April 18, 1890 – more good dates to know.

Search “US immigration, timeline” for more information, including how to search both Ellis Island and Castle Garden records.

Did your ancestors come to North America from another country?

Ireland, for instance?

It would help to know dates of the major famine periods in Ireland, (search “famines, Ireland”) as well as where most emigrating Irish families landed in Canada or the United States.

Or, if they crossed the sea to England, where might they have landed there?

ArchivesIf you are searching censuses in England, many counties changed boundaries several times, particularly after the 1974 Boundary Changes, but some changed prior to that time.

One line of my family lived in the Black Midlands, and their town (Dudley) changed counties several times between Staffordshire and Worcestershire. I was sure that others must have recorded the county incorrectly, until I found an article detailing the various changes in boundaries!

Search online for “British counties, changes” and you will find several excellent sites with details.

You can imagine how important this information could be when searching through Censuses! I’ve learned to check on maps, and look in nearby counties, states, provinces, when researching an ancestor’s residences over time.

We are used to registering every life event with the government, but such was not the case in our ancestors’ days.

For example, passenger lists were not required to be recorded and filed until 1865 in Canada, 1820 in the USA, 1837 in much of England.

In Germany, some vital statistic registrations began in 1792, others not until 1876, varying by state, and they were not kept in a central repository. In general, birth, marriage, death registrations were not required until a state/county or province was formed and had a center for records.

This date of “vital statistics” is remarkably varied throughout the world, and you will need to have the details for each place, in order to search successfully and efficiently for your ancestors.

My personal Genealogy Resource File includes the following (based on my particular ancestors):

  1. Canadian Provinces/Territories, dates of Confederation and Civil Registration – and maps!
  2. Canadian ships passenger lists source (at Library & Archives)
  3. Border Crossings dates, and Passport requirements for both US and Canada
  4. Canadian land grants periods
  5. U.S. States (PA, CT, NY, MA, ME, WA, OR) and county borders, history of formation
  6. Immigration dates for Ellis Island, Crystal Garden
  7. US cities receiving immigration ships; dates
  8. Dates of US wars from 1600-1945
  9. UK Civil registrations, where held
  10. UK counties, border changes, where to find details
  11. Scotland, Ireland church registrations, census dates
  12. The German Palatine emigration paths
  13. Blank Census forms for Canada, USA, UK

…and much more! Pensions, social insurance records, railway historical maps – there is no end to the variety of resources available to help you.

I also have old and current maps of all sorts including of villages, land grants, towns, county borders, plus details of various historical events which might have impacted on my ancestors’ lives.

All of these resources in a genealogy resource file would make your research more efficient and accurate, plus these resources will allow you to provide correct citations of the sources you find.

Enjoy your research and build up your own personalized Genealogy Resource File!

Now that you understand some of the common issues of internet genealogy, you may want to look at other helpful resources.

____________________

About the Author

Celia Lewis, MA, is a Genealogy Consultant who loves both mysteries and families, finding Genealogy research a perfect fit! Now retired, she enjoys having the time to pursue her passions, along with spending time with her five grandchildren.

photo credit: waterlilysage via photopin cc


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
War of 1812: Preserve the pensions.

War of 1812: Preserve the pensions.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Save the pension records of the War of 1812.

You can help to preserve the War of 1812 pension records!

One of the benefits of the modern era of genealogy research is the massive and rapid digitization of records that could be centuries old, being held  schools, churches, government offices, archives, museums and private households.

Why is this beneficial?

  • Provides easy access to researchers.
  • Raises awareness of records, how they are stored, maintained and preserved.
  • Reduces the need for physical access to valuable records, helping to preserve them for future generations.I r

I recently read the post, “Victory at the Thames – War of 1812,” on the “Preserve the Pensions Blog.”

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) has been coordinating a national fundraising effort and is seeking donations from patriotic and military heritage societies, genealogical and historical societies, and corporations and individuals. Fold3.com and Ancestry.com are offering a dollar-for-dollar match of each donation.

Donations to this multi-year project will support the scanning of the pension files at the National Archives in Washington D.C. to create a searchable index to the images. The War of 1812 pension applications are a high priority project based on their value to genealogists and historians, and therefore the importance of preserving the fragile records.

This growing digital collection is available on Fold3.com’s website.


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.

Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.

After 50 years in storage at the Latter Day Saints (LDS) Church records vault, several online genealogy companies will collaborate in their efforts to index, digitize and publish billions of pages of genealogy files and records.

The companies involved in the endeavor are familysearch.org, ancestry.com, myheritage.com, and findmypast.com. On its own, familysearch.org was expecting the enormous project to take up to 300 years to complete. Rather than denying our generation and several others the opportunity of accessing all of the genealogy files and records, LDS’ familysearch.org, with the help of the other companies, will see the project completed in just decades, providing the opportunity for most of us to see its completion in our lifetimes.

I’ve never been one who complains about the charges for accessing records online. Considering the quantity of genealogy files and records being processed and the number of people required to do the job, the costs have to be covered somehow. Just imagine how much it used to cost when online access was not available and researchers either had to travel to site, or pay others to do the research on site – both at great expense.

Familysearch.org has released the following press release, which contains links to a very informative infographic about the project.

Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.FamilySearch Works to Put the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

February 4, 2014

See Related Infographic

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—FamilySearch International (online at FamilySearch.org) is leading the way in digitizing and providing access to billions of historical genealogical records by collaborating with commercial family history companies and the online community. This collaboration will carve centuries off the time needed to increase access to the world’s historical records, enabling millions more people to quickly discover, share, and preserve family memories for generations.

Recent announcements of agreements with commercial family history companies are some of the first installments in fulfilling FamilySearch’s desire to remove the traditional barriers to genealogical research. FamilySearch CEO, Dennis Brimhall, explains that joining forces with other organizations, where possible, brings significantly more financial investment and technological resources to the family history industry than the nonprofit community could provide on its own.

FamilySearch plans to collaborate on digitization projects with commercial family history companies to publish new historical records collections on FamilySearch.org that have never seen the light of the Internet. Working with individual industry leaders such as Ancestry.com , Archives.com, findmypast, Fold3, and MyHeritage will also increase and broaden access to the records FamilySearch has already published online. FamilySearch plans to involve many other interested organizations that will provide records, tools, and other resources to allow more people to build, preserve, and share their family trees online.

In a keynote address at the RootsTech 2013 conference, Brimhall shared FamilySearch’s vision to empower people globally to share their family memories and save them for future generations. “Imagine if your ancestors had easy access to computers, digital cameras, and family history websites that allowed them to upload, preserve, and share important family memories through photos, stories, and vital names, dates, and places? How amazing would that be?” Brimhall said.

FamilySearch and its predecessors have been preserving and providing access to the world’s family history records for over 100 years. FamilySearch volunteers have indexed just over three billion records in extraction and online indexing projects, but they have only scratched the surface.

“For the top countries with the highest online research demand, using our existing resources and volunteers, it will take up to 300 years to index the 5.3 billion records that we already have,” Brimhall noted. “That means you and me and the next 10 generations of our posterity would not live to personally benefit from them. And there are another 60 billion records that still need to be digitally preserved. We can do significantly better by working together with other organizations and as a community.”

As new historical record collections are published under the latest agreements with FamilySearch’s affiliates, they will be available on FamilySearch.org and for free on Ancestry.com , findmypast.com, or MyHeritage.com to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch offers free public access to Ancestry.com and findmypast.com through 4,715 local FamilySearch-owned family history centers worldwide. Additional details regarding expanded records access will be announced sometime in 2014, when they are available.

Infographic: Putting the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

Interesting Facts Addressed by FamilySearch Community Initiatives

  • Approximately 28 billion people lived on the earth in recently recorded history—from A.D. 1500 to 2010.
  • Information for an estimated one billion unique individuals may exist today in online family trees—a fraction of how many still need to be linked.
  • The bulk of online family history research today is focused on the records of North America, Europe, and Latin America. Less than seven percent of these records are searchable online today.
  • An estimated 60 billion historical records still exist to be digitally preserved and indexed.
  • Only eight percent of FamilySearch’s current online indexing volunteer workforce is non-English speaking. The majority of historical records to be made searchable online in the future will require volunteers who read non-English records.
  • With current volunteers and resources, it could take up to 300 years to make the current inventory of historical genealogical records searchable online. This time can be reduced to 20 to 30 years with more business and community involvement. Disclaimer: FamilySearch does not establish relationships with third parties or take other steps that may be in violation of the terms of contractual obligations. As a result, FamilySearch may not be able to provide some information, records, indexes, or other data to third parties or the public.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,500 family history centers in 70 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •