Tag: Denmark

Transcription and Translation: Plaque at St. Bendts, Ringsted, Denmark listing Danish rulers from 1130 to 1331.

Transcription and Translation: Plaque at St. Bendts, Ringsted, Denmark listing Danish rulers from 1130 to 1331.

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Transcription and Translation of Plaque at St. Bendts, Ringsted, Denmark listing Danish rulers from 1130 to 1331.

St. Bendts Plaque

??????? in ST: BENDTS ????? in RINGSTED:
Duke KNUD LAVARD, died 1130.
King VALDEMAR I, died 1882.
His Queen, SOPHIA, died 1198.

His Son Duke CHRISTOPHER, died 1166.
King KNUD VI, died 1202.
His Sister RIKIZA ??:of SVERRIG, died 1220.

Skt. Bendt's Church, Ringsted.

King VALDEMAR II, SEIR, died 1241.
His Queen, DAGMAR, died 1213.
His Queen, BEENGJERD, died 1220.
King VALDEMAR III, died 1231.
His ?????????? ELEONORA, died 1231.
KUND, Duke of LOLLAND, died 1260.
His Son ERIK, Duke of HALLAND, died 1304.
Prince VALDEMAR, King CHRISTOPHER I Son.
King ERIK PLOVPENNING, died 1250.
King BIRGER of SVERRIG, died 1321.
His Queen MARGARETHE, died 1341.
King ERIK MENVED, died 1319.
His Mother, Queen AGNES, died 1304.
His Queen INGEBORG, died 1319.
ERIK, Son of CHRISTOPHER II, died 1331.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

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The following are the more recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

 

Argentina

Brazil

Denmark

Italy

Peru

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

 

Australia

Brazil

Canada

Germany

Italy

Mexico

Norway

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

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The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Feature image: Map of the kingdom of Prussia in the 18th century.

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Argentina

Australia

Canada

Chile

Croatia

Czechoslovakia

Denmark

Honduras

Hungary

Netherlands

Philippines

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Australia

Germany

Guam

Mexico

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

 


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It’s important to know naming conventions for genealogy #namingconventions.

It’s important to know naming conventions for genealogy #namingconventions.

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I have learned to pay close attention to the names of individuals in my research as knowledge of naming conventions can be key to investigating a family’s genealogy. Frequently, the names provide valuable clues to the answers to my questions.

 

Individuals from differing cultures, time periods, religions and families were known to follow specific traditions and naming conventions. It’s important to know these naming conventions for genealogy research as accuracy of your conclusions can be adversely affected by misinterpreting names, titles, etc.

 

These practices could also change over time according to the practices of the day.

Below are some examples of naming practices I encountered in my research.

It’s very important to note that making assumptions in genealogy using only naming conventions is dangerous as these conventions were not followed by everyone. However, knowing naming conventions can be great help finding an ancestor as long as the other information matches to confirm the identity.

 

France

Last names in France.
Last names in France.
  • Instead of surnames as we know them, the French in the 17th and 18th centuries routinely adopted nicknames or titles denoted by the word ‘dit’  or ‘dite’ before it. This title or nickname could have referred to any number of things including a descriptive term, location, family or property in France. This was the case for my ancestor, Pierre dit Laverdure, one of the Huguenots to settle in Acadia in the mid-17th century. I couldn’t find the translation for ‘Laverdure’, but I was able to find a modern translation for ‘verdure’ as follows:

ver·dure
a. The lush greenness of flourishing vegetation.
b. Vigorous greenery.
2. A fresh or flourishing condition: the verdure of childhood.

[Middle English, from Old French, from verd, green, from Latin viridis.]

My reasoning is that, based on this definition, there are several possibilities, including: he was from a lush, green, fertile area of France; he was involved in forest management or forestry; he was in a profession concerned with vegetation such as farming; the ‘fresh or flourishing condition’ referred to in the definition above could allude to his being ‘young’, ‘youthful’, ‘vigorous’, or ‘junior’ to someone.

 

French Canada

 

  • Giving all children of the same gender the same middle name, usually in honor of a relative or ancestor.
  • Naming children after parents and grandparents (either given or middle name).
  • After the death of a child, they frequently used the name for a sibling born later.
  • Children were often given hyphenated first and middle names (i.e. Marie-Madeleine or Jean-Jacques), but they would frequently adopt one or the other for everyday use.
  • French-Canadians and Metis in early days often followed the original French convention of using the prefix of ‘dit’ or ‘ditte’ as above.

 

African-Americans

 

  • During and after the civil war, slaves frequently adopted the surname of their current or previous owner.

 

Ireland

Irish surnames.
Irish surnames.

Boys

  • 1st son was named after the father’s father.
  • 2nd son was named after the mother’s father.
  • 3rd son was named after the father.
  • 4th son was named after the father’s eldest brother.

Girls

  • 1st daughter was named after the mother’s mother.
  • 2nd daughter was named after the father’s mother.
  • 3rd daughter was named after the mother.
  • 4th daughter was named after the mother’s eldest sister

 

UK, USA and Canada

British last names.
British last names.
  • One or more children in a family, regardless of gender, were frequently given their mother’s maiden name as a middle name to carry that name on within the family. Infrequently, I have seen  families where one or more of the children had the mother’s maiden name as a middle name.

 

Wales

 

  • In Wales, individuals carried their father’s given name as a surname, preceded by a term signifying whether they were male or female. The son of a man named Rhys would use the surname ‘ap (or ab) Rhys’ and a daughter would use ‘ferch (or verch) Rhys’.

 

Scotland

Scottish clan map.
Scottish clan map.
  • In Scotland, children were usually given first names according to the following: first son is named after his father’s father; the second son is named after his mother’s father; the third son is named after his father; the first daughter is named after her mother’s mother; the second daughter is named after her father’s mother; and the third daughter is named after her mother.
  • The surname used depended on the region the family came from. For the most part, in the Scottish highlands, the child’s surname was a combination of the prefix ‘Mc’ or ‘Mac’ followed by the given name or variation of the father (i.e. Jonathan McKenzie – the son of Kenneth). In the lowlands, the suffix ‘son’ was added to the given name of the father, as in Johnson, Robertson, Jacobson, etc.
  • The Scottish were also known to take a surname from a location, occupation, and/or physical characteristic.

 

China

 

  • Chinese immigrants frequently took on entirely new names – both given and surnames – in the language of the their new country. Sometimes they would choose names that sounded phonetically similar to their original Chinese names.

 

Japan

 

  • Japanese names put surname first and given name last. However, names were frequently changed to follow the western convention of given name first and surname last when emigrating to the west.

 

Roman Catholics

 

  • Roman Catholics frequently named their children after saints or choose names from the bible, especially in French-Canadian and latin families.

 

Scandinavia and Iceland

Scandinavian last names.
Scandinavian last names.
  • The children adopted a modified version of the given name of the father as a surname, by adding ‘son’ at the end of the father’s given name. For example, in my husband’s family in Sweden, the name in America was Gummeson, originating with David Gummeson, who was the son of Gumme Svensson, who in turn was the son of Sven Hakansson. For female children, the same practice occurred, but the added suffix was either ‘dottir’ or ‘dotter’, as in Gummesdottir. This could frequently change upon immigration to the west to comply with western naming conventions.

 

Non-specific

 

  • Families often adopted naming traditions such as the first-born son and/or daughter being named in some way after either a parent, grandparent or other close relative.
  • Some changed their surname for personal or cultural reasons. In my own family on my father’s side, a male ancestor took exception to his surname of Turmel/Turmelle. In French tradition, the suffix ‘elle’ signifies the female gender. This gentleman had his surname legally changed to Turmaine and it’s carried on in this form to the present day. Other branches of the family retained the Turmel/Turmelle surname.
  • Others changed their surnames for religious reasons. As seen in a recent episode of ‘Who Do You Think You Are’, actress Helen Hunt discovered that an ancestor of hers had changed her name from Rafenberg to Roberts – most likely to escape anti-semitism, especially as she was a widow trying to support her family.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 26, 2014

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 26, 2014

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Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions.
FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

The list is extensive and will break into multiple pages as June 18th seems to have been a very busy, productive day at FamilySearch.org.

The countries with the most additions are Italy, Netherlands, Brazil, United States and Poland.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

Belgium

Bolivia

Brazil

Canada

Chile

China

Croatia

Czechoslovakia

Denmark

El Salvador

Germany

Honduras

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Italy

Mexico

Netherlands

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Russia

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Ukraine

United Kingdom

  1. England, Kent, Manorial Documents, 1241-1976
  2. England, Norfolk, Parish Registers (County Record Office), 1510-1997
  3. England, Norfolk Register of Electors, 1844-1952
  4. Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598-2009
  5. United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914-1920

United States

Venezuela

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Canada

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – June 4, 2014

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – June 4, 2014

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The following are the most recent FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates and additions of numerous collections.

 

<a href=
Ancestry.com Updates and AdditionsAncestry.com Updates and Additions” width=”320″ height=”236″ /> An example of a probate document as listed in FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.
FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Brazil

Chile

Denmark

Guatemala

Italy

Korea

Netherlands

Peru

Poland

Portugal

Spain

Sweden

United States

Venezuela

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Austria

Brazil

Colombia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Dominican Republic

Estonia

Germany

Indonesia

Peru

Philippines

United Kingdom

United States

photo credit: wundercapo via photopin cc


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – April 1, 2014

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – April 1, 2014

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The following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions” src=”https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/small__10339374786.jpg” alt=”FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions” width=”238″ height=”320″ />FamilySearch.org

Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Denmark
Dominican Republic
England
Italy
Ivory Coast
Korea
Luxembourg
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Peru
Philippines
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Russia
Slovakia
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Ukraine
United States

 

Ancestry.com

Australia
Italy
South Africa
United States
Wales

photo credit: jurvetson via photopin cc


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