Tag: book

Transcription: Virginia Marriage Records, 1700 to 1850

Transcription: Virginia Marriage Records, 1700 to 1850

  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    1
    Share

Transcription of the Virginia Marriage Records, 1700 to 1850, pg 186.

Cocke; Virginia, Marriage Records, 1700-1850
Virginia marriages (click image for full size view.)

June 1, 1758. Thomas Lewis to Susanna Ellis, daughter of John Ellis; sec., Joseph Ellis; witn., Valentine Wood.
October 27, 1747. William Pryor to Sarah Wood; sec., Valentine Wood; witn., Henry Wood.
April 3, 1744. William Cannon, Jr., to Elizabeth Lewis; sec., John Lewis; witn., H. Wood; certificate of consent from Elizabeth’s father, Charles Lewis; witn., John Lewis and Robert Morgan [X].
April 19, 1742. James Cooke, Jr., to Mary Anne Chastain ; sec., Henry Wood; witn., Joseph Dabbs and Isaac Bates.
March 4, 1742. George Watwood to Mary Taylor; sec., James Robinson; witness, Henry Wood.
October 11, 1755. Thomas Riddle to Agnes Mims; sec., Wm. Robards; witn., Valentine Wood; certificate of consent from David Mims; witn., Hezekiah Pin-year and Drury Minis.
August 21, 1753. Abraham Sallée to Elizabeth Woodson; sec., John Woodson; witn., Anthony Christian, Alexander Grant.
July 1, 1742. Samuel Ridgeway to Mary Bellamy; sec., Charles Lewis; witn., H. Wood.
November 20, 1753. Joseph Dawson [X] to Judith Dudley; sec., James George; witn., David Murray.
April 28, 1753. Benjamin Bradshaw [X] to Anne McBride; sec., John McBride; witn., William Pryor; certificate of consent from John McBride; witn., Agnes Lane, Elizabeth McBride.
July 3, 1743. Edmund Gray to Mary Mayo; sec., Geo. Dabbs; witn., H. Wood; certificate of consent from William Mayo; witn., George Carrington, Joseph Scott.
January 17, 1736. John Williamson to Prudence Cox; sec., Charles Turnbull; witn., H. Wood.
December 19, 1733. Nicholas Davies to Judith Randolph; sec.,  Middleton Shaw; witn., H. Wood.
May 17, 1738. William Stith to Judith Randolph; sec., Nicholas Davies; witn., Will Randolph.
March 16, 1742. Hutchings Burton to —-———; sec., William Allen; witn., H. Wood.
December 8, 1734. Joseph Scott to Sarah Mayo; sec., John Barnit [X]; witn., H. Wood; certificate of consent from William Mayo, father of Sarah; witn., James Marye and William Allen.
November 20, 1751. Guy Smith to Anne Hopkins; sec., Will Pryor; witn., H. Wood. ‘ W
September 14, 1747. Thomas Massie to Susanna Holland; sec.,. Henry Martin; witn., H. Wood.

186

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    1
    Share
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The following is a transcription of a biography of Jehu Burkett and his family, taken from the publication, “BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT.”

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 1

 

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 2

lt has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1745, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley. ]ehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners.” Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects,.Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, as there is an entry in the Army accounts “of that state which would indicate that he was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coincidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of his life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina,“ who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27,1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13,1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David and Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. lt should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Following is my transcription of the biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely from the Dictionary of National Biography.

Featured image: Replica of the first Fort Hall in Pocatello, Idaho.

Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography
Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography

DR. OSCAR B. STEELY.

 

Greater than the responsibility of almost any other line of human endeavor is that which rests upon the physician; the issues of life and death are in his hands, and the physician’s skill and power must be his own; not by gift, by purchase or influence can he acquire it. If he would retain relative precedence, it must come as the result of superior skill, knowledge and ability, and these qualifications are possessed in a marked degree by Dr. Oscar B. Steely, who is not only numbered among the representative physicians and surgeons of the state, recognition of this fact having been made by Governor McConnell in his “appointment as surgeon general of Idaho, but his executive ability, force of character and strong personal magnetism have caused his election and reelection to the responsible office of mayor of the progressive city of Pocatello, where he resides.

Doctor Steely was born in Belleville, Pa., on August 22, 1862, a son of William and

055

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography

Sarah (Baker) Steely, natives of Pennsylvania, to which commonwealth his early paternal German ancestors emigrated in the early Colonial days, as did the progenitors of his mother, who came from England at about the same period of time, and both his maternal and paternal great-grandfathers patriotically served in the long and bloody contest of the Revolutionary war.

Doctor Steely received his preliminary literary education in the public schools of his native place, thereafter continuing his studies in the Bloomsburg State Normal School and Literary Institute, from which he was graduated with a high standing, thereafter matriculating at the famous University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1883, in the meantime engaging in pedagogic work in Philadelphia, where he held the office of supervising principal of the public schools of the city for four years, thereafter entering Jefferson Medical College, where he completed the prescribed course, being graduated therefrom with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1891.

Thus thoroughly prepared and equipped for his profession, he served one year as surgeon in the Jefferson Hospital, and in 1892

056

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

located in Pocatello, Idaho, and entered at once upon a successful and far-reaching practice, being the ofiicial physician and surgeon of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, of which he is still in incumbency, and he has been very successful both as a physician and a surgeon. His private practice in both medicine and surgery is one of the largest in the state, controlling a large clientele of leading citizens, and manifesting a liberality and generosity in his treatment of the poor and unfortunate which have bound them to him as with hooks of steel. He stands high in medical circles, was a member of the Pennsylvania State Medical Association and the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, while his papers and articles on medical and surgical subjects take rank as authoritative, and his incumbency of the office of surgeon general was marked by a careful, conservative, but at the same time progressive administration of the duties connected therewith.

A man of strong character and unbounded energy, he has ever stood true in all the relations of life and has acquired a high and well-deserved popularity. He was a candidate of the Progressive Young Men of Pocatello for

057

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

mayor of that city in I902 and after a stirring canvass was elected by a very complimentary vote, and he is now in the incumbency of the office, having been elected on the Republican ticket in 1903 by a handsome majority to the second term, running far ahead of the rest of the ticket, and thus proving himself not only a very efficient but an exceedingly popular mayor, ever maintaining a high dignity and performing the duties of the position to the decided advantage of the city.

In county, state and national political affairs he has been an active force in the Republican party. discharging with fidelity and advantage to the people every trust his party has reposed in him. In the last Republican state convention he was distinctively honored by being placed in candidacy for governor of the state, lacking only three votes of securing the nomination. In educational lines his influence and labors have been effective and far-reaching. and he is at present the president of the school board of Pocatello. and he has been an earnest and public spirited member of the board for the last six years. Fraternally he has attained the Knight Templar degree in the Masonic order, being the high priest of the

058

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

local chapter, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and the Eagles.

In Denver, Colo., on December 31, 1900, Dr. Steely was united in matrimony with Miss Bernice H. Smith. a native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of Edwin K. and Helen A. Smith, also natives of the old Bay state. They have one son, Hobart H., and their attractive home possesses a most pleasing atmosphere of cultured hospitality.

It is not too much to say of Dr. Steely. as has been said by several who are excellent judges of character. that his qualifications would dignify and elevate any office in the gift of the people of his state. He has held responsible positions with great ability, has adorned every walk in life in which he has been found, and is an inspiration and example to good men of all classes, while his advice is held most valuable in business and financial circles, and his careful and conscientious execution of every duty has gained him high prestige.

Progressive men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont and Oneida counties, Idaho. 1904.

059

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •