Tag: archaeology

DNA, archaeology, anthropology and genealogy open eyes to the past.

DNA, archaeology, anthropology and genealogy open eyes to the past.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

It seems that every time I turn on my computer to view the internet, I find new articles and posts about discoveries made in DNA, archaeology, genealogy and even science, that shed new light on our search into the origins of our own family and heritage, and the origins of our ethnic groups.

Today I stumbled upon the article “Discovered 2.3 k-yr-old human skeleton throws light on our ancestry,” on the ANINews website.

According to this article, “DNA from the complete 1.5 metre tall skeleton is one of the ‘earliest diverged,’ oldest in genetic terms, found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.”

The DNA evidence pointed to this man being from a branch that is the most closely related to ‘Mitochondrial Eve’ and now presumed to be extinct.

Reading about these new discoveries points out something very intriguing to me. In the past, the discoveries were made based on exploration, experimentation, and finding something new, affecting and changing the future.

Today, the discoveries one hears of most are those delving into the past, using all disciplines of social studies including genealogy, anthropology and archaeology; and the sciences including DNA and chemical analysis.

Today’s most well known and talked about discoveries are looking to the past and where we came from; individually, as a family, and as part of a broader ethnic group.

This suits me fine as this is my area of interest and fascination. I can’t help but feel excitement with each new discovery in my own genealogy, as well as reading and hearing about the discoveries made with a much broader, more global impact.

It all matters and sheds light on who we are and where we came from.


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Archaeologists find ancient ‘comics’ decorating Roman tomb in Jordan | Haaretz.com

Archaeologists find ancient ‘comics’ decorating Roman tomb in Jordan | Haaretz.com

  • 3.8K
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3.8K
    Shares

Archaeologists in Jordan have uncovered a Roman-era tomb decorated with spectacular frescoes that include rudimentary “comics” – which were written in Aramaic using Greek letters. The drawings provide extraordinary testimony to the diverse and cosmopolitan environment in the Hellenistic border towns of the Roman empire.

Like other wondrous archaeological discoveries, the nearly 2,000-year-old burial was unearthed by chance in late 2016 during roadworks, in this case in front of a school in the Jordanian village of c, just north of Irbid.

Since then a team of local and international researchers has been studying the find, which they believe to be part of a necropolis in the ancient Greco-Roman settlement of Capitolias, reports the CNRS, France’s National Center for Scientific Research.

The 52-square-meter tomb is divided into two burial chambers and contains a large basalt sarcophagus, all in very good condition considering that there are indications the tomb has been looted in the past, says archaeologist and epigraphist Julian Aliquot.

It likely dates to the early days of the city, which was founded in the late 1st century C.E., Aliquot says, according to the CNRS report.

Read on . . .

Source: Archaeologists find ancient ‘comics’ decorating Roman tomb in Jordan – Archaeology – Haaretz.com


  • 3.8K
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3.8K
    Shares
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Likely birthplace of Henry VII found in Pembroke Castle | The Guardian

Likely birthplace of Henry VII found in Pembroke Castle | The Guardian

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

A dig in the castle’s grounds has uncovered the walls of a ‘showy’ late medieval house.
Archaeologists believe they have identified the exact site of Henry VII’s birth in 1457 after excavations in the grounds of Pembroke Castle in Wales uncovered the remains of a massive medieval mansion worthy of one of the most famous kings of England.

Just days into an initial dig, archaeologists have uncovered up to half a metre of the building’s walls – and they are yet to reach the main floor levels. One wall is a metre thick.

They have also unearthed so many slates and tiles that they are concluding it had a slate roof. Green-glazed ridge tiles have also been found, which suggest a particularly imposing building, while other finds include a curving stair from a spiral staircase.

James Meek, who is heading the excavation for the Dyfed Archaeological Trust, said such finds are already suggesting “a fairly showy building” inside of the outer walls of the castle . . .

Read on . . . https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/sep/16/likely-birthplace-of-henry-vii-found-in-pembroke-castle


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Augmented reality archives bring historical artifacts to life | EdTech

Augmented reality archives bring historical artifacts to life | EdTech

  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    2
    Shares

A new application makes it possible for students to explore delicate historical artifacts without ever laying a finger on them.
The Augmented Archives project, started through a partnership between the Washington College Archives and Washington College’s Academic Technology Department, brings artifacts to life “using augmented reality technology to make rare documents, fragile artifacts and curator commentary videos accessible to exhibit visitors.”

“I see this as a great way for us to change the way we are engaging with our artifacts,” says Heather Calloway, archivist and special collections librarian at Washington College in a video on the project. “We could take something out and digitize it in various ways.”

Recognized by Campus Technology as some of the leading education futurist tools of 2018, the Augmented Archives could have a significant impact on how students interact with research materials as they produce papers and projects.

Augmented reality designed by students for students

Augmented Archives began as a student initiative, designed to address a concern for the Washington College Archives: “In an increasingly technological world, how do we leverage emerging technologies to connect viewers with the historic objects in our collections?”

With school funding, students used HP’s Aurasma AR software — recently renamed HP Reveal — to create the AR content attached to each recorded piece from the library’s archive . . .

Read on . . .


  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    2
    Shares
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Westminster Abbey’s Hidden History | Archaeology Magazine

Westminster Abbey’s Hidden History | Archaeology Magazine

  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares

Westminster Abbey is one of the most famous buildings in Christendom.
It has stood witness to signal events, serving as the site of English coronations for almost one thousand years, hosting dozens of royal weddings and funerals, and containing the tombs of monarchs, poets, scientists, and countless other notable Britons.

Recently, it was the site of an unusual archaeological dig. The excavations did not take place outside on the Abbey’s grounds, as might be expected, but instead in the triforium—an arcaded gallery some 70 feet above the nave, or central aisle.

The 20th-century poet John Betjeman described the triforium as offering the “best view” in Europe. Today, many people have, without realizing it, experienced that vantage point on television. The cameras that broadcast important Abbey ceremonies are often stationed in the triforium to provide a bird’s-eye view of the events.

The gallery itself has not been open to the public since it was built in the thirteenth century, but that is set to change. Abbey authorities have decided to transform it into a museum space, soon to be known as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Galleries.

Since the triforium is currently only accessible via a narrow wooden spiral staircase, a new tower, which will provide visitors with direct access to the triforium from outside, is being constructed. This is the first major architectural addition to the Abbey in 350 years . . .

Read on . . .


  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    3
    Shares
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Genetics rewrites the history of early america – and, maybe, the field of archaeology | Smithsonian

Genetics rewrites the history of early america – and, maybe, the field of archaeology | Smithsonian

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

The story of how Homo sapiens spread from Africa to the rest of the world is a tangled epic, full of false starts and dead ends. Yet perhaps nowhere is the puzzle more difficult than in the Americas, two landmasses divided from the rest of the world by two huge oceans. Zoom out, though, and you’ll see that isolation has only been imposed for the last 11,000 years; before then, a narrow land bridge called Beringia stretched between Siberia and Alaska, providing an icy highway for travelers.

This week, scientists reported explosive new findings on the genetic story of one of those ancient travelers: an infant girl named Xach’itee’aanenh T’eede Gaay by the local indigenous people, who lived for a brief time 11,500 years ago in an Alaskan community now called Upward Sun River. The infant’s genome has the power to rewrite what we know about the human journey into North America—and in doing so, points to the larger genetic revolution that is reshaping the field of archaeology.

For decades, archaeologists have hypothesized that humans entered the Americas from Asia using Beringia (the first man to suggest the existence of a land bridge was actually a 16th-century Spanish missionary named Fray Jose de Acosta). But even as more sites of occupation were discovered in Siberia and Alaska, pointing to human occupation and the movement from west to east, questions remained. When exactly did the migration happen, and how did it happen? In one wave, or many?

In January 2017, researchers at the Canadian Museum of History concluded that a horse jawbone found in the Bluefish Caves of the Yukon bore human markings from 24,000 years ago, meaning that early Americans had settled here by 22,000 BC. That would push back the date of human occupation in North America by 10,000 years. But those findings—like so many in this field—proved controversial, and haven’t been universally accepted by the archaeology community.

The new report on Xach’itee’aanenh T’eede Gaay complicates this narrative further. While she may be “just” 11,500 years old, she provides incontrovertible evidence for the timing of human migration.

Read on . . .

 

Source: Genetics rewrites the history of early america – and, maybe, the field of archaeology | Smithsonian


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •