LAC announces acquisition of Emily Carr’s journal.

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Having lived on the west coast of Canada for most of my life, and having visited several British Columbia museums, art galleries, etc. over the years, I can say that one artist’s work was sure to appear or even be featured. Emily Carr is an icon of western Canadian art and is known most for her representations of our natural environment and the native cultures. I would love to be able to see the 1901 Emily Carr’s journal, being released by Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

Her painting “Kitwancool,” of 1928 captures the overwhelming feeling of being in the natural environment of British Columbia so well. It’s one of my favorites.

Emily Carr
Emily Carr

News Release from  Library and Archives Canada; 2014-05-29.

Library and Archives Canada acquires Emily Carr’s journal of Queen Victoria’s funeral.

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is pleased to announce the acquisition of a booklet created by renowned Canadian artist and writer Emily Carr. The booklet was acquired last night at the Heffel auction in Vancouver, BC.

The booklet, which dates back to 1901, demonstrates both sides of Carr’s career—her skill as an artist and her talent as a writer. Carr chronicles the efforts she and her friend Hannah Kendall made to view the funeral procession for Queen Victoria on February 2, 1901. Carr and Kendall discovered that their lack of height made it difficult to see the passing horses, soldiers, and cortege. The art student had planned ahead, hiding a stool under her voluminous skirts. This prohibited item did not help much, however, as Carr lost it in the confusion of the large crowd.

To commemorate this experience, Carr created two booklets—one for her friend, and another for herself. The drawings and verse provide insight into the early days of this very important Canadian artist, demonstrating the ways in which she challenged the conventions and social rules of the time.

Emily Carr, Kitwancool, 1928.
Emily Carr, Kitwancool, 1928.

Emily Carr is an iconic Canadian artist and writer whose work has garnered both national and international recognition.

This acquisition was supported by a financial contribution from the Friends of Library and Archives Canada, a not-for-profit organization that promotes and encourages public awareness of LAC.

Quick Facts

  • While LAC also holds materials that represent the formal reaction to the end of Victoria’s long reign, Emily Carr’s hand-produced booklet documents the more informal aspects of the Queen’s passing.

Quotes

“Our Government is proud to have acquired this important part of our history. Library and Archives Canada’s acquisitions continue to document the rich diversity of Canadian society. As we approach Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, there is an opportunity for all of us to reflect upon and appreciate our great heritage.”

Shelly Glover
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

“Emily Carr is arguably one of Canada’s most important artists, and this prestigious acquisition fits very well into the documentary art mandate of our institution.”

Hervé Déry, Acting Librarian and Archivist of Canada
Library and Archives Canada

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Contacts

Media Relations
Richard Provencher
Library and Archives Canada

819-994-4589

[email protected]

About Library and Archives Canada

The mandate of Library and Archives Canada is to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of present and future generations, and to be a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, thereby contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada. Library and Archives Canada also facilitates co-operation among communities involved in the acquisition, preservation and diffusion of knowledge, and serves as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions. Stay connected with Library and Archives Canada on Twitter (@LibraryArchives), Facebook, Flickr and YouTube.


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