Category: Family Genealogies

Transcription: Obituary for Harvey S. Jaques (1834 – 1912).

Transcription: Obituary for Harvey S. Jaques (1834 – 1912).

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The following is my transcription of the obituary for Harvey S. Jaques (1834 – 1912).

 

Harvey S. Jaques

 

Harvey S. Jaques.
Harvey S. Jaques.
Harvey S. Jaques obituary and photo of his home.
Harvey S. Jaques obituary and photo of his home. (Click on image for full size view.)

Harvey S. Jaques was born Sept. 5, 1834, near Millville, Butler County, Ohio, here he spent his early childhood. He was the oldest of 12 children of Richard and Mary Jaques. Four brothers, John Louis, Daniel, and James and one sister Mrs. Ella Long survive him. His ancestors came from New Jersey.

At the age of 13 his family settled near Sharptown, Franklin County. Here he grew to man- hood and became one of the sturdy citizens of his community. He had the pleasure of sitting at the feet of Prof. Chase at Mt. Carmel and Brookville College. The inspirations and ideals of this man became a part of his life. He learned to believe in the curse of ignorance, in the efficacy of schools in the joy of serving others, in the beauty in home, in daily life and out of doors, in laughter, in love in faith, in all ideals and distant hopes that lure us on; that every hour of every day he received a just reward for all he was and all he did, in the present and its opportunities, in the future and its promises, and in the divine, joy of living.

For several years he taught school in Franklin County. Many of his students have become staunch citizens of the county. These will attest to the seriousness earnestness, uprightness, and his demand for orderly conduct. He chose for his life companion Martha Stout, the daughter of Ira and Eliza Stout. To them were born eight children. the two oldest John and Jenny died in infancy. His wife and the remaining children, Lyde, Bert, Rose, Edna, Lenore, Fred and ten grandchildren mourn his loss. In his home life he was a devoted, conscientious and ideal husband and father. His family’s welfare was his.

For forty-five years he conducted the store at Whitcomb. As a business man he was the symbol of honesty and fair dealings with all men. He lived the principle embodied in the Golden Rule. His life practically ended in the store for there the beginning of his final illness took place.

About forty years ago he united with the M E Church of Whitcomb. As a member of this church his services are well known.

As a citizen and neighbor he was respected and honored. A type of citizen that the community needs but cannot hope to retain. On May 17, 1912, after a short illness, his life ended at the age of 77 years, 8 months and 12 days. He could truly have said with Paul:- “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the father; henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness which the Lord the righteous judge, shall give me at that day, and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.”

CARD OF THANKS.

We desire to thank our neighbors and friends for their many acts of kindness rendered and expressions of sympathy uttered in our recent bereavement

Mrs. H. S. Jaques and family.


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Oh, the difference one letter can make when using copied or transcribed documents!

Oh, the difference one letter can make when using copied or transcribed documents!

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This joke is the best illustration I’ve ever seen of the negative effects of working from copied documents instead of originals. This should be on display in every library, archive and genealogy center as a reminder of the perils awaiting.

This is something I think about every time I do a transcription, and this type of consequence is why I use wildcard symbols in place of characters I can’t quite make out or understand in the original or copy I’m working from. It ensures the reader knows there is doubt and if it’s important to them and their research, they’ll look for and consult the original.

The Old Monk

A new monk arrives at the monastery. He is assigned to help the other monks in copying the old texts by hand.

He notices, however, that they are copying copies, not the original books. So, the new monk goes to the head monk to ask him about this. He points out that if there were an error in the first copy, that error would be continued in all of the other copies.

The head monk says “We have been copying from the copies for centuries, but you make a good point, my son.” So, he goes down into the cellar with one of the copies to check it against the original.

Hours later, nobody has seen him. So, one of the monks goes downstairs to look for him. He hears a sobbing coming from the back of the cellar, and finds the old monk leaning over one of the original books crying. He asks what’s wrong.

The old monk sobs, “The word is celebrate.”


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Transcription: David D. Shelby, “Men and Women in America”

Transcription: David D. Shelby, “Men and Women in America”

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Following is my transcription of the biography of David D. Shelby from “Men and Women in America.”

SHELBY, David D.:

United States circuit judge; born in Madison County, Ala., Oct. 24, 1847 ; son of Dr. David and Mary (Boulding) Shelby. He studied law in Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., was admitted to the bar in 1870, and practised at Huntsville, Ala., until appointed by President McKinley, March 2, 1899, judge of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Fifth Judicial Circuit, in which office he is still serving. Judge Shelby was formerly active in politics as a Republican leader, was a member of the Alabama Senate, 1882-18834, and was the Republican nominee for chief justice of Alabama in 1886. He married in Huntsville, Ala., in 1872, Annie Davis. Address: Huntsville, Ala.

Men and women of America.
1910.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Coon family reunion article; “The Newark Advocate” of August 21, 1937.

Transcription: Coon family reunion article; “The Newark Advocate” of August 21, 1937.

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Article regarding the Coon family reunion in “The Newark Advocate” of August 21, 1937.

 

Coon Reunion.

Coon; Reunion Article; The Newark Advocate; August 21, 1937
Coon; Reunion Article; The Newark Advocate; August 21, 1937

The 12th annual Coon reunion was held in ”Roadside park” Utica, Sunday, with 38 relatives and friends present. During the business meeting, in charge of the president, Fred Cullison, the following officers were elected for the coming year: President. Clive Davis, Utica; vice president. Cary Coon, Hanover; secretary-treasurer, Paulme Barcus, Mt. Vernon. . Following the picnic dinner, a short program was given. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. John Coon. Mrs. Sara Devoll, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cullison. Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Roberts and daughters Betty, Marie and Lois. Mr. and Mrs. John Holland of Columbus, Mr. and Mrs. Logan Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Clive Davis and children, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Stradley and children, Garland Moreland. Cary Barcus. Mr. and Mrs. Mathew Clark. Mr. and Mrs Finley Holton. Mr. and Mrs. William Hunter and sons, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Francis and children, Vernon Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Marmie and children. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Marmie. Ralph Daugherty; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Devoll. and John Speers, Cambridge: Mr. and Mrs. Guy Smith. Raymond Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Ora Holton and children. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Marmie and children. Mr. and Mrs. Cary Coon: Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day and son. Mt Vernon; Harold and Edna Hupp. Margaret Keyser. Cambridge: Mr. and Mrs. Ray Barcus and daughters. Mt. Vernon: Gale and Albert Earley. Utica. The meeting next year will be held in the same place.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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DNA: The best hard drive on earth.

DNA: The best hard drive on earth.

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It turns out DNA is the best storage medium there is on Earth. Nothing beats it. Think about it, all the directions that make you up are stored on tiny proteins that are hard to see even with a microscope. The human genome (all of those directions controlling your eye color, hair color, height, skin) contains between 25,000 and 30,000 genes. That’s a ton of information compressed down into these microscopic structures.

 

Let’s put into perspective just how much data DNA can hold?

Consider this fact: one gram of DNA can hold the same amount of information as 14,000 Blu-ray discs! (One gram is about how much a paperclip weighs!)

What’s even more incredible is how long information in DNA can be saved. In 2008, Scientists discovered a human femur bone washed up alongside a river in Siberia. Six years later, that bone was finally analyzed to learn how old it actually was. Turns out it came from a man who lived and died over 45,000 years earlier. The actual DNA, still preserved in that fossil, confirmed his age.

So DNA is a material that can hold mind boggling amounts of data for ridiculously long periods of time.

Now think about your own DNA with the thousands of genes it contains, all of which combined make up who you are.

But DNA is not just useful as you develop, it can actually be decoded to learn about who you are. There are genetic tests for genealogy and ancestry and others that can help you uncover your body’s natural strengths when it comes to fitness.

Science is still decoding the complex workings of how all those proteins interact with each other, so it’s fair to say there’s much more to your code than anyone yet realizes.

However, DNA is also reactive to the environment around it and can degrade over time.  All these minor environmental chinks in your genetic armor could, over time, affect your health. This is why it is important to secure and store your DNA, just like the data you would keep safe on a hard drive.

Getting a sample of your DNA stored as early possible means it will be in its purest form and may be more useful for medical advances in the years to come.

By understanding that DNA is nature’s best possible hard drive, scientists are now working hard to transform it into the hard drive for our future.

____________________

To learn more, visit http://www.dnaspectrum.com.

Source: DNA Is the Best Hard Drive on Earth


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Transcription: The Bec or Beke lineage.

Transcription: The Bec or Beke lineage.

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The following is my transcription of the Bec or Beke lineage including the Barons Beke of Eresby, as recorded in “A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire.”

 

Beke, Henry; A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire
Beke, Henry; A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire

[…]

BEC OR BEKE — BARONS BEKE OF ERESCY.

By Writ of Summons, dated 23 Jun, 1295.

LINEAGE

Walter Bec, Lord of Eresby, co. Lincoln, m. Agnes, dau. And heiress of Hugh, the son of Pinco, and had issue,

I.    Hugh, who d.s.p. In his return from the Holy Land.
II.    Henry, being a person of weak understanding, his two next brothers shared with him the inheritance.
III.    Walter, | participators, with their brother Henry, in their father’s lands.
IV.    John,  |     “            “    “    “        “    “    “    “        “
Nicholas, inherited the church patronage of his father.

The eldest surviving son,
Henry Beke, inherited Eresby and other manors. He m, Hawse or Alice de Multon, sister of Thomas de Multon, and was s. By his son,
Walter Beke, Lord of Eresby, who m. Eva, niece of Walter de Grey, archbishop of York, and had issue,

I.    John, his successor in the lordship of Eresby.
II.    Thomas, bishop of St. David’s, d. 14 April, 1293.
III.    Anthony, the celebrated bishop of Durham, and patriarch of Jerusalem. “This Anthony,” says Dugdale, “was signed with the cross in the 54th Henry III, in order to his going to the Holy Land with Prince Edward; and on the 3rd of Edward I, being then a clerk, was made constable of the Tower of London. Moreover, in anno 1283, being present at the translation of St. William, archbishop of York, and at the whole charge of that great solemnity (the king, queen, and many of the nobility being also there), he was then consecrated bishop of Durham, by William Wickwane, archbishop of York, in the church of St. Peter, within that city. After which, anno 1.94 (22nd Edward I), the king discerning his great losses in Gascoigne, he was sent to Rodolph, king of Almaine, to make a league with him; and the same year, upon the arrival of the cardinals to treat of peace between King Edward and the King of France, he readily answered their proposals in the French tongue. Furthermore, in anno 1296, King Edward entered Scotland with a powerful army; he brought thither to him no less than 500 horse and 1,000 foot, besides a multitude of Welsh and Irish. After which, the same year, being sent ambassador into that realm, he was solemnly met by the king and nobles; and after much dispute, brought them to such an accord that they totally submitted themselves to the pleasure of King Edward. Also, upon that rebellion, which again broke out there the next year following (at which time they used great cruelties to the English), he was again sent thither to inquire the truth, and, to advertise the king thereof. And in the 26th of Edward I was again sent into Scotland, with certain forces, at which time he assaulted the castle of Dulton, and took it. And lastly, in 33rd of Edward I, being with the Earl of Lincoln and some other bishops, sent to Rome, to present divers vessels of pure gold from King Edward to the Pope, his holiness taking especial notice of his courtly behaviour and magnanimity of spirit, advanced him to the title of ‘Patriarch of Jerusalem.’”
“Amongst other works of this great prelate,” continues Dugdale, “he founded the collegiate churches of Chester and Langcester, as also the collegiate chappel at Bishops-Auckland, all in the county palatine of Durham. Moreover, it is reported that no man in all the realm, except the king, did equal him for habit, behaviour, and military pomp, and that he was more versed in state affairs than in ecclesiastical duties; ever assisting the king most powerfully in his wars; having sometimes in Scotland 26 standard-bearers, and of his ordinary retinue 140 knights; so that he was thought to be rather a temporal prince than a priest or bishop; and lastly, that he d 3 March, 1310, and was buried above the high altar in his cathedral of Durham.” This prelate was the first bishop that presumed to lie in the church, on account of the interment of the holy St. Cuthbert, and so superstitious were they in those days that they dared not bring in the remains at the doors, but broke a hole in the wall, to convey them in at the end of the church, which breech is said to be still visible.
I.    Margaret, m. To Galfridus de Thorpe.
II. Another dau., a nun
The eldest son,

38

B E L

John Beke, s his father in the feudal lordship of Eresby, and was summoned to parliament as Baron Beke of Eresby, on 23 June, 20 September, and 2 November, 1295, and 26 August, 1296, having previously (4th of Edward, 1275 6) had license to make a castle of his manor-house at Eresby; his lordship m. ——, and had issue,

I.    Walter, who must have d.s.p. And vita patris, before the gift of Eresby to Robert Willoughby.
I.    Alice, m. To Sir William de Willoughby, Knt., and had issue,
Robert Willoughby, who inherited, at the decease of his grand uncle, Anthony Beke, bishop of Durham, the great possessions of that eminent prelate, and was summoned to parliament, temp. Edward II, as Lord Willoughby de Eresby. (See that dignity in Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage)
II.    Margaret, m. To Sir Richard de Harcourt, Knt., ancestor of the Harcourts, Earls of Harcourt.
III.    Mary, d. Unm.

Lord Beke gave Eresby to his grandson, Robert Willoughby, and d. 1303-4, when the Barony fell into abeyance between his two daus. And co-hers, the Ladies Willoughby and Harcourt, and so continues amongst their descendants.
Arms. — Gules, a cross moline, arg.

[…]

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine (1934-2005)

Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine (1934-2005)

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These are treasured pictures of my Dad, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine, who passed away about ten years ago at the age of 71.

He was the son of Henri Turmaine and Rose Amande Emery, born January 30, 1934 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

He married Patricia-Gail Marrion Melanson on March 8, 1958 in Germany and had four children, myself being the oldest, then Renee, Andrea and Danielle.

Here are several pictures of my father through the years.


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Transcription: London Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812

Transcription: London Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812

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The following is my transcription of two pages of the London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials register of 1538-1812. These two pages cover 1607-1609 specifically.

___________________

For assistance with translating the dates, see my post Learning to transcribe from ye olde English and Latin.

___________________

The image links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812
London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812; 1607-1609.

London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812

Marriages

Lodowick Ap William and Marguerett Ballam    |   The Xiij day of December    |   1607
John Temple and Jane Cull    |   The jth day of February    |   1608
Francis Smith and Alice Waltmastowe    |   The vjth day of February    |   1608
John Mill and Elizabeth Salt    |   The xiiJth day of February    |   1608
??????? Frederick and Elizabeth Distrobeuf    |   The xijth day of Aprill    |   1608
John Burnwood and Ann Newman    |   The xxijth day of Aprill    |   1608
George Mannison and Agnes Smith     |   The xxijth day of May    |   1608
Royce Griffiths and Alice Williams     |   The xxvth day of May    |   1608
Thomas Courtney and Ellinor Brereton     |   The xxvjth day of May    |   1608
Robert Mall and Bridgett ?ewton     |   The xiiijth day of July    |   1608
Thomas Jackson and Joane Tiebeaut     |   The xxvth day of July    |   1608
Thomas Menzy and Ann Marthe    |   The xxvijth day of August    |   1608
Richard ????? and Mary Robins    |   The viijth day of October    |   1608
……
John Shakespeare and Sara Chatiells    |   The xixth day of October    |   1608
Robert Baylie and Ann Langley    |   The xiith day of December    |   1608
Richard Ri???out and Jane Tompson     |   The xxijth day of December    |   1608
Edward ????? and Ann ??????    |   The xth day of January    |   1609
William Browne and Alice ??????    |   The xiijth day of January    |   1609
Edward Burk and Ann Bowe     |   The xiiijth day of January    |   1609
Thomas Kindersley and Mary Griffin     |   The xxixth day of January    |   1609
George Bracewell and Elizabeth Mullo     |   The xxviijth day of February    |   1609
John Ratcliff and Ann Waford     |   The xxxth day of March    |   1609
Edmund Shawe and Elizabeth Wordsworth    |   The xxxth day of March    |   1609
William Wilding and Esther Reece     |   The xiijth day of December      |   1609
Jeoffery Jauques and Joane ??all     |   The xiijth day of February    |   1610
Thomas G???h???y and Katherin X??ar???on     |   The xxiiijth day of May    |   1610


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Transcription: German Pioneers of the Ship Mortonhouse

Transcription: German Pioneers of the Ship Mortonhouse

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Transcription of a passenger list of German pioneers of the ship Mortonhouse, including Ulrich Croll.

German pioneers of the ship Mortonhouse
German pioneers of the ship Mortonhouse

—————————-

Mortonhouse 1729

25

Sworn Before the Governour in Council, 19th August 1729. Cleared from Deal in Great Britain. James Coultas.

Rt Charles

“At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, August 19th, 1729, … A List was presented of the Names of Seventy five Palatines, who with their families, making in all about One hundred & Eighty persons, were imported here in the Ship Mortonhouse, James Coults, Mr., from Rotterdam, but last from Deal, as by Clearance thence dated 21st of June last.” From Minutes of the Provincial Council, printed in Colonial Records, Vol. III, p. 367.

[List 9 B] Palatines imported in the ship Mortonhouse, Jas Coultas, Mr, from Rotterdam, but last from Deal p. Clearance thence, dated 21st June 1729. Subscribed this Declaration 19th Augt. 1729.

Carl Ernst Musselbach                         Jakob Crebil
Georg Threhr [Dreher]                        Henrich Schlengeluf
Johan Philip Ranck                              Henrich Gunter
Hans Műller                                           Hans Uldric (H) Vry
Kunradt Wőrntz                                    Christ (O) Vry
Casper (X) Dorest                                 Jacob (O) Bowman
Dielman Kolb                                         Johan Nicolas Prietschler
Hans Michel Frőlich                             Johannes Műller
Michael Borst                                         Jacob (O) Obere
Johannes Hoock                                    David Montandon
Roedolp (X) Moor                                 Peter Weger
Hans Jacob (O) Roodlys                      Valentine (/) Ficus
Uldric (X) Root                                      Adam Orth
Nicolaas (O) Peffell                               Hanns Michel Heider
Heinrich Dubs                                       Johannes Reis
Mr. (X) Meli [?]                                     Johann Stephen Rumer
Henrich Blim                                         Gőrg Adam Wedel
Hans Ullrich Hűber                              Ulrich (/) Croll
Christ (B) Baown                                   Adolph Schombach
Christ (C) Kroll                                      Conrad (O) Kilner
Hendk. (H) Werner                               Johannes (/) Binkler
Gerhard Műller                                      Michel Weber
Andres Mys                                             Rudolff Walder

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Pennsylvania Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 – Beaven to Eyre

Transcription: Pennsylvania Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 – Beaven to Eyre

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The following is my transcription of the Pennsylvania Church and Town Records dated between 1708 and 1985, for surnames Beavan to Eyre (in alphabetical order).

 

Pennsylvania, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 - Aubrey Bevan - small
Pennsylvania Church and Town Records

CHESTER FRIENDS CEMETERY

On the west side of Edgmont Avenue between Sixth and Seventh Streets, Chester, Pa.

____________________

The image above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

 

PENNSYLVANIA CHURCH AND TOWN RECORDS

Beavan, Ann

Died February 18 1768 Aged

Grave No.

39

Beavan, Aubray

Died February 12 1761 Aged 56 years

“ “

40

Beavan, Jane

Died

“ “

52

Bond, Benjamin

Died June 27 1858 Aged 76 years

“ “

98

Bond, Margaret

Died February 28 185- Aged 72 years

“ “

99

Brobson, Rebecca

Born the 23rd of 10 month 1790

Died the 3rd of 5 month 1864

“ “

106

Brobson, William

12-18-1785; 12-30-1858

“ “

105

Burk, Emeline T.

Died

“ “

43

Byre, Abigail

Born Jun 6 1786 Died July 9 1858

“ “

115

Byre, Elizabeth

“ “

112

Byre, Jacob

Died August 20 1826

In the 83rd year of his age

“ “

111

Byre, Jacob

“ “

116

Cobourn, Tacey

11-6-1813; 11-14-1848

47

Chestnut, Lizzie L.

Daughter of John and Phoebe J. Chestnut

Born June 7 1861 Died January 10 1880

“ “

139

Chestnut, Mamie A. Lane

Daughter of John and Anna Chestnut

Died August 8 1860 Aged 15 months

“ “

137

Churchman, Sally B.

Wife of Jesse M. Eyre

Born September 20 1813 Died March 21 1846

“ “

51

Cowpland, Caleb Esq.

Who departed this life the 12th day of

the 10th month 1757 in the 67th year

of his age

“ “

16

Cowpland, Sarah

Wife of Caleb Cowpland Died

“ “

17

Davis, Carolina

Born September 21 1830 Died April 1 1852

“ “

128

Davis, Susanna

Born July 26 1837 Died March 20 1852

“ “

127

Dick, Thomas B. Esq.

Who departed this life April 21 A.D.1811

Aged 43 years 1 month

Draper, Richard H.

Born September 28 185- Died November 12

1851

“ “

135

Dyer, William

“ “

69

Engle, Joseph

Died October 8 1857 Aged 88 years

“ “

130

Engle, Susanna

Wife of Joseph Engle

Died July 15 1253 Aged 75 years

“ “

129

Eyre, Abigail

Died

“ “

63

Eyre, Arabella

Daughter of William & Susan Eyre

Died

“ “

48

Eyre, Elizabeth

Wife of Jonas P. Eyre

Born the 1st month 13 1813 Died

“ “

134

Eyre, Jane

Died

“ “

65

Eyre, Jonas P.

Born October 25 17- Died

“ “

132

Eyre, Joshua

Son of David W. and Mary P. Eyre

Died the 2nd Month 25 1856

Aged 9 months and 17 days

“ “

133

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for General George Cadwalader

Transcription: Obituary for General George Cadwalader

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Following is the transcription of the obituary for General George Cadwalader, published in the Bucks County Gazette on Thursday, February, 6, 1879.

 

Obituary; General George Cadwalader
Obituary for General George Cadwalader

General George Cadwalader died in Philadelphia, on Monday afternoon, in the seventy-third year of his age, from an attack resembling apoplexy, with which he was seized on Sunday night. He was a brother of Judge Cadwalader, who died on Sunday week, and was the last of the five sons of General Thomas Cadwalader. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1806, engaged in mercantile business, and filled the position of President of the Mutual Insurance Company for a third of a century. He served gallantly in the Mexican War as well as in the Slaveholders’ Rebellion, and distinguished himself in both positions. His record is one of the best which he can safely leave behind as a grand inheritance to his family and friends.

___________________

The image of the image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for Leonard Scott Keefer and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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Transcriptions: Researched ‘puzzle pieces’, a family story makes: William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

Transcriptions: Researched ‘puzzle pieces’, a family story makes: William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

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Following are my transcriptions of numerous newspaper clippings regarding William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia.

 

WILLIAM ARCHER SR. (grandfather)

 

William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia October 29, 1767
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

October 29, 1767 (Virginia Patriot, Richmond, Virginia, pg. 4)

STRAYED or STOLEN from Bermuda Hundred the last of January, a light bay horse about five years old, 4 feet nine or 10 inches high, a few white ??? on his forehead, and branded on the rear buttock WK in a piece. Whoever delivers the said horse to me living in Amelia County, shall have 20 shillings reward.

William Archer

 

Archer, William; March 21, 1806
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

March 21, 1806 (Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia, pg. 1)

FOR SALE,

A TRACT OF LAND, in the county of Amelia, containing 800 acres, within one mile of the Court House, about forty from Manchester, and the same from Petersburg. There is a most excellent ?and for a Tavern on this land. A credit of one, two and three years, will be given for the greater part of the purchase money. The subscriber also offers for sale, about twenty negroes, consisting of men, women and children. A credit of twelve months will be given; and could they be sold in families, I would allow a credit of two years.

WILLIAM ARCHER.

Powhatan, March 14

 

WILLIAM ARCHER (Grandson)

 

Archer, William; September 2, 1806
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

September 2, 1806 (Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia, pg. 1)

SCOTTVILLE JOCKEY CLUB.

The races will commence at this place, on Thursday the 18th of September, free for any horse, mare or gelding — weights as usual.

1st Day. — Three mile heats, for the amount of the subscription, after deducting contingent charges — say, about one hundred pounds.

2nd Day. — The proprietors purse, two mile heats — half the amount of the first day.

3rd Day. — An handy cap purse — two mile heats, for an elegant gig.

WILLIAM ARCHER, Sec’ry to the Club.

Powhatan, Court House, August 29. (ep9w.)

 

Archer, William; April 12
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

April 12, 1808 (Virginia Gazette and General Advertiser, Richmond, Virginia, Vol. XXL, Issue 1554, Pg. 1)

Cash Sales.

– o –

TO BE SOLD for ready money, at the front door of the Eagle Tavern, on Tuesday the 10th day of May next, by virtue of a deed of trust executed to the subscribers by David Ross, Esq. on the 28th day of November, in the year 1804, and recorded in the General Court, for the purposes therein mentioned.

One certain tract of Land in the county of Chesterfield, containing by estimation 645 acres, be the ssame more or less, commonly called Chester-Hill, together with the Lands appertaining thereto, as a moiety of a certain tract of Land adjoining, called Auburn Chase, in the whole 645 acres, being the same land conveyed by Ben. Mosby to the said David Ross by deed, bearing date the day of . The necessary conveyances will be made to the purchaser or purchasers on the paymen of the purchase money.

E. W. ROOTES, | Trus-

WILSON ALLEN, | tees.

Richmond, April 8th, 1808.

______________________________________

PURSUANT to an Act of Assembly authorizing the Sale of the Glebe Land of Southam Parish, Powhatan County.

The undersigned Commissioner will offer for sale for Cash, the aforesaid Glebe Tract, on the premises, on Saturday the 28th day of May next. — The money arising from the sale, will, agreeably to the said act, be put to Interest, which Interest is to be paid annually to the Rev. John H. Saunders, the present incumbent.

DABNEY M. WHARTON,

EDWARD JOHNSON,

WILLIAM BENTLEY,

,WILLIAM HICKMAN,

SAML. H. SAUNDERS,

WILLIAM ARCHER, and

WILLIAM POPE,

Comm’rs.

April 7th, 1808. 6 wks.

 

Archer, William; August 23, 1811, Norfolk Gazette and Publick Ledger, (Norfolk, VA), Page 3.pdf 2014-04-02 10-21-22
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

August 23, 1811 (Norfolk Gazette and Publick Ledger, Norfolk, Virginia, Pg. 3)

At a Chancery District Court held in Williamsburg; the 16th day of July, 1811.

William Arthurs, Plaintiff, against

Thomas Archer, Lucy Archer, William Archer, John Archer, Susan Archer, and Sally Archer, heirs of Abraham Archer, deceased, the said Susan and Sally Archer being infants by Thomas Archer their guardian, assigned to defend them,

Defendants.

The bill in this cause having by an order entered therein on the twenty-fifth day of April last, been taken for confessed, as to the defendants Thomas, Lucy, William and John Archer, and the said defendants having been served with a copy of the said order, and failing to appear and answer the said bill, and the cause coming on by consent to be heard as to the defendants Susan and Sarah Archer on the bill, their answer, and the exhibits, the court on consideration thereof, doth adjudge, order, and decree, that Corbin Griffin, Thomas Griffin, and Francis Page, or any two of them, after giving four weeks previous notice of the time and place of sale, in one of the Norfolk newspapers and at the door of the Court-House in the town of York, do make sale of the houses and lots in the bill mentioned, lying in the town of York, at public auction, for ready money, and out of the proceeds of the sale after discharging the expenses thereof, pay unto the plaintiff the sum of seventy-one pounds with interest thereon, to be computed after the rate of six per centum per annum, from the eleventh day of October, 1804, till paid, and his costs by him expended in the prosecution of this suit, and divide the surplus thereof, if any, into six equal parts, and pay unto each of the defendants one sixth part thereof, and report their proceedings to the court in order to a final decree.

A copy,

EDMUND CHRISTIAN, c. c.

______

In obedience to the foregoing decree, we shall, on Monday, the 16th day of September next, before the Swan Tavern in the Town of York, proceed to sell to the highest bidder, the property mentioned in the decree foregoing, and on the terms mentioned in said decree. This property is worthy the attention of a person wanting a family residence, the improvements on the lots are a two story frame Dwelling House, ?0 by 25 feet, a Kitchen and Dairy, with a garden enclosed and front year ; the situation is elevated and dry, lying on the banks of York river, pleasant and healthy in summer ; there are no buildings contiguous to this tenement which can either render its situation confined or the houses liable to fire ; on, this lot it is believed that a valuable spring of water may be opened near the building.

Signed Corbin Griffin,

Thomas Griffin,

Francis Page.

York Town, August 23, 1811. 4w

 

Archer, William; November 1, 1811, Virginia Patriot, (Richmond, VA), Page 1.pdf
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

November 1 and 29, 1811 (Virginia Patriot, Richmond, Virginia; Pg. 1 and Pg. 4)

VIRGINIA

At a Superior Court of Chancery, holden at the capitol, in the city of Richmond, the 2nd day of Sept. 1811.

Mathew Mosby, Martha F. Mosby, Thomas Jones, and Elizabeth his wife, late Elizabeth Mosby, which said Mathew, Martha F. and Elizabeth are children of the late Elizabeth Mosby, who was formerly Elizabeth Archer, – – – – – – Plt’s.

AGAINST

John Brander, administrator of Mary Archer, deceased; William Archer, and Blackman Mosby, – – – – – – Def’ts.

The defendant Blackman Mosby not having entered his appearance and given security according to the Act of Assembly and the rules of this court, and it appearing to the satisfaction of the court, that he is not an inhabitant of this country : On motion of the plaintiffs by their counsel, It is ordered, That the said defendant do appear here on the first day of the next term and answer the bill of the plaintiffs ; and that a copy of this order be forthwith inserted in some newspaper published in the city of Richmond for two months successively, and posted at the front door of the capitol in the said city. A copy — Teste,

wgt W.d: W. HENING, c. c.

 

Archer, William; January 11, 1812, Enquirer, (Richmond, VA), Page 4.pdf 2014-04-02 10-23-49January 11, 1812 (Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia, Pg. 4)

By virtue of a Deed of Trust executed to me by Sherley Eggleston, of the county of Amelia, for the purpose of securing a debt therein r???ed to be due to William Archer of Powhatan, will be sold for cash, at Amelia courthouse, on Saturday, the 11th of January, two negroes, called Katy and Isbell, the property of the said Eggleston.

W. S. ARCHER.

Dec. 21. ???

 

Archer, William; May 4, 1814, Virginia Patriot, (Richmond, VA),.pdf
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

May 4, 1814 (Virginia Patriot, Richmond, Virginia)

Members elected to serve in the next Legislature of Virginia.

Warwick — William Garrow, John Jones

Powhatan — William Archer, William Crump

Cumberland — John Hatcher, German Baker

Prince Edward — Wm. Booker, Wm. Lindsey

Norfolk Borough — Miles King, Jr.

_________ County — C. B. Poindexter, M. Cooke

King & Queen — Humphrey Walker, W. R. Roane

Essex — Laurence Muse, Musco Garnett

Dinwiddie — John Pegram, John Watkins

Greensville — Thomas Spencer, J. M. Jeffries

Mecklenburg — John C. Goode, Arm. Burwell

Lunenburg — Robert Chappell, S. Niblett

Sussex — William Parham, Nathaniel Cargill

Culpeper — Zeph. Turner, John S. Barbour

Fauquier — Thomas Marshall, Thonton Buckner

Prince William — Red Foster, James E. North

Charles City — John Tyler, Benjamin Harrison

Pittsylvania — Rawleigh White, William Walton

Amherst — David S. Garland, Hill Garter

Campbell — Jesse Burton, Wm. J. Lewis

Henry — Robert Hairston, Robert Allen

Goochland — J. W. Bates, John Underwood

York — Robert G. Scott, Robert Pescud

 

Archer, William; October 29, 1814, Virginia Patriot, (Richmond, VA), Page 4.pdf
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

October 29, 1814 (Virginia Patriot, Richmond, Virginia, Pg. 4)

A petition was presented and read of William and Henry Heth, praying to be paid the sums of money at which two slaves (viz. one named Cyrus Archer, the property of the said Archer, and one named Dick, the property of the said Heath) were valued by the court of Chesterfield county, which sentenced them to death for the crime of burglary ; it appearing that the said slaves have broken jail, and escaped from custody, and have not sice been re-taken ; in consequence whereof the Auditor has refused to give the petitioners, respectively, warrants on the treasury :

Ordered, that the said petion be referred to the Committee of Claims ; that they do examine the matter thereof, and report the same with their opinion thereupon, to the House.

 

Archer, William; November 9, 1814, Virginia Patriot, (Richmond, VA), Page 4.pdf 2014-04-02 10-54-02
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

November 9, 1814 (Virginia Patriot, Richmond, Virginia, Pg. 4)

It appears also to your committee, from the petition and evidence of William Archer and Harry Heth, that two negro men, their slaves, were condemned to be hanged by the county court of Chesterfield on the charge of burglary ; that they were each valued at four hundred dollars ; that before the day of execution they broke jail & have never been heard of since ; and that they made application in due form to the Auditor for their values, which was refused by him, in consequence of their not being actually executed :

2. Resolved, therefore as the opinion of this committee, that the petition of William Archer and Harry Heth, praying compensation for the value of the aforesaid slaves, and interest thereon from the time of the sentence of the court for their execution, is reasonable.

 

Archer, William; March 6, 1816, Virginia Argus, (Richmond, VA), Volume I, Issue 99, Page 4.pdf Archer, William; March 6, 1816, Virginia Argus, (Richmond, VA), Volume I, Issue 99, Page 4.pdf
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

March 6, 1816 (Virginia Argus, Richmond, Virginia, Vol. I, Pg. 4)

NOTICE.

THE SUBSCRIBERS,

UNDER THE FIRM OF

A R C H E R S & A N D E R S O N ,

Will hereafter carry on the

COAL BUSINESS

(VERY EXTENSIVELY.)

Lately conducted by Wm. & Branch Archer, alone

Our OFFICE will be kept on D. Street, near the Bason.

WILLIAM ARCHER,

BRANCH T. ARCHER,

HENRY ANDERSON.

Feb. 3. — 6t.

 

Archer, William; April 24, 1816
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

April 24, 1816 (American Beacon, Norfolk, Virginia, Vol. II, Issue 65, Pg. 3)

STATE ELECTIONS

DELEGATES

Powhatan — William Archer, Collin Clarke.*

Fairfax — ______ Thompson.* ______ Peake.*

Essex — Henry Lattaine, Robert Garnett.*

* New Members.

 

Archer, William; J. P. Cocke; July 5, 1822, Enquirer, (Richmond, VA), Volume XIX, Issue 17, Page 4.pdf 2014-04-02 10-22-14
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

July 5, 1822 (Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia, Vol. XIX, Issue 17, Pg. 4)

In Amelia County Court, May 23, 1822.

WILLIAM A. BAIRD and Avarilla his wife, formerly Avarilla Stringer, one of the children and distributees of Daniel Stringer, dec., Complainants,

Against

James P. Cocke, sheriff of Amelia county, and as such adm’or of Daniel Stringer, elec. James Stringer, William Striner, Daniel Stringer, Armistead Stringer, John Stringer, Polly Stringer, Rebecca Stringer, William Smith and Betsy his wife, formerly Betsy Stringer, which said James, William, Daniel, Armistead, John, Polly, Rebecca and Betsy are children and distributees of Daniel Stringer, deceased, Defendants.

The defendants William Stringer, Daniel Stringer and Armistead Stringer, not having entered their appearance and given securitGy according to the act of Assembly, and rules of this court, and it appearing to the satisfaction of the court, that they are not inhabitants of this commonwealth : On the motion of the complainants by William S. Archer, Esq. their counsel, It is ordered, That the said defendants do appear here on the fourth Thursday in August next, and order be forthwith inserted in someone of the newspapers printed in Richmond or Petersburg for two months successively, and that another copy be posted at the front door of the Courthouse on two successive court days.

Copy — Teste J. T. LEIGH, Clk.

June 4. 8 — w8wII

Archer, William; October 11, 1822, Enquirer, (Richmond, VA), Volume XIX, Issue 45, Page 3.pdf 2014-04-02 10-42-28
William Archer of Powhatan, Virginia

October 11, 1822 (Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia, Vol. XIX, Issue 45, Pg. 3)

Departed this life on Sunday the 7th of Oct. at his residence in Powhatan county, WILLIAM ARCHER, Lieutenant Colonel of the 1st Regiment of Cavalry, in the 42d year of his age.

He was the eldest son of Major Peter F. Archer, and grandson of Colonel Wm. Archer of Amelia county. William Archer had ??????? represented the county of Powhatan for the last 1? years and his popularity in that county was so well established that he never lost an election. A kind master, a fond husband, an affectionate parent, and a steadfast friend : he ?????? to a quick and strong sense of injustice a geneality of temper and a limitless courage that would have ???? honor to the ??????????? of chivalry.

The tears of the poor for their benefactor, and the solemn and sad recollections of his acquaintance on the loss of their friend, are the best ??????????? on his ????????. He is gone : and ?? he had any of the failings of humanity they were ?? ??????????? so allied to the good qualities of his nature that in him they seemed to s?? ??? and ????? his ??? ?????? as appropriate virtues.

????? ?? ?? ?????: The man who sketches this frail memorial of his worth, has known him long and well, and owes him much : ?? ??? the ????? principle ????? cease ?? ?????, ??? memory shall fail to recollect amidst the long ????? of his future life, the gentle ???????????? manners and devoted friendship of William Archer.

?? ?????????? in Essex county on Saturday the ???? of September Miss REBECCA TAYLOR BEVERLEY, second daughter of Mr. Robert Beverley of that place.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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Everyone of European descent can claim Charlemagne as an ancestor.

Everyone of European descent can claim Charlemagne as an ancestor.

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Sometimes I get asked if I’m related to the great physicist Ernest Rutherford. His discoveries about the atomic nucleus gave birth to physics in the 20th century.

Everyone of European descent can claim Charlemagne as an ancestor.
Everyone of European descent can claim Charlemagne as an ancestor.

He is the father of nuclear physics, with labs and atoms named after him.
I’m not related to him. I can reveal however that I am a direct descendent of someone of similar greatness: Charlemagne, Carolingian King of the Franks, Holy Roman Emperor, the great European conciliator. Quelle surprise!
But we are all special, which means none of us are. If you’re vaguely of European extraction, you are also the fruits of Charlemagne’s prodigious loins. A fecund ruler, he sired at least 18 children by motley wives and concubines, including Charles the Younger, Pippin the Hunchback, Drogo of Metz, Hruodrud, Ruodhaid, and not forgetting Hugh…

[read more]
Source: So you’re related to Charlemagne? You and every other living European…


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Did my children’s ancestors fight on both sides of the War of 1812?

Did my children’s ancestors fight on both sides of the War of 1812?

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Of all the wars our ancestors have fought, the War of 1812 is the one that most interests me because I’m Canadian, and the result of this war is recognized as the birth of our nation. After researching ancestors on both sides, I’ve discovered several on Mark’s side who fought in the War of 1812, but I’m left with one unanswered question. Did my children’s ancestors fight on both sides of the War of 1812?

 

Unfortunately, I haven’t yet researched enough of my own ancestors to find any who may have fought in the War of 1812. My sister has been researching my family for years and I’ve steered clear in fear of duplicating our efforts. What a waste that would be!

I do know, however, that we are of strong Acadian ancestry, and the Acadians held very strong feelings on both sides. The Acadians who remained on the east coast, for the most part, fought for the Americans, while the Acadians who had travelled to what is now Quebec and Ontario, fought for the British.

The following are my children’s ancestors on my husband’s side who fought on the American side in the conflict.

In each of the entries below, I have noted the relationship of the individual to my children in brackets following the name. In two instances, the relationship is by adoption, but to us it’s no less important.

Judge Rezin Shelby (5th great grandfather)

Rezin Shelby served as Captain in the 1st Regiment (Denny’s) Ohio Militia during the War of 1812.

War of 1812 Minor's Claim of William B. Coon for his son.
War of 1812 Minor’s Claim of William B. Coon’s son.

Coon, William B. (5th great grandfather by adoption)

In 1813, William B. Coon was enlisted as a Private into the 36th Regiment of the New York militia regiment under Capt. S. Philmore and Major John Roberts. This regiment was commanded by Colonel Thomas Miller.

He also served from Plattsburg to Sacketts Harbour under Colonel Pike in the 15th US Infantry.

William received military bounty land of 40 acres at the SE quarter of NW quarter, Section 12 in recompense for his service in the War of 1812.

William died before he could receive his land bounty in Wisconsin, and his son David subsequently took it over and relocated there.

Adams, Alanson (5th great grandfather, by adoption)

Alanson Adams was enlisted in the 11th Infantry Regiment, under Second Lieutenant John Varnum Barron’s Company. He was shot in the leg, and as a result received a military pension.

The following is an excerpt from his obituary in the Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth of Tuesday, April 26, 1881.

“Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations.  Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers.  Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor.  In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812.  He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane.  At the latter place he was wounded.  Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.”

Captain David Shelby (sixth great grandfather)

Captain David Shelby was nephew to Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky, our most illustrious family member to serve in the War of 1812. David served in the First Regiment Mounted (Finley’s), Ohio Militia.

Sanford Porter, Sr. (6th great granduncle)

Sanford served in the War of 1812 with Captain Knott’s Company, Colonel Warren’s Regiment, whose headquarters were in Black Rock, four miles from Buffalo City.

This headquarters was most likely the main target when the British and Indians burned Buffalo City, resulting in Sanford’s family losing everything because they lived in Buffalo City.

Burket, Adam (1st cousin, 7 times removed)

I haven’t been able to find out much about Adam Burket beyond the fact that he served in the battle of Tippecanoe.

Biddle, Colonel Clement (4th cousin, 10 times removed)

Colonel Clement Biddle was the Captain of the State Fencibles and Colonel of the Pennsylvania First Regiment Volunteers, Light Infantry.

Governor (and General) Isaac Shelby (1st cousin, 8 times removed)

General Isaac Shelby
General Isaac Shelby

Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky may not be the closest ancestor who served in the War of 1812, but he is the most important and the one that interests me most.

He was renowned for and distinguished himself for his actions in battle against United Empire Loyalists in Canada in the War of 1812.

Ultimately, his forces defeated Loyalist forces at the Battle of the Thames in southern Ontario.

“In 1812, he was elected Governor of Kentucky.

Battle of the Thames of War of 1812 map.
Battle of the Thames Map

During the next year, he organized a body of four thousand volunteers, and marching with them to the support of Harrison, participated in the victory of the Thames.”

[Mililtary Heroes of the War of 1812 #2; Shelby, Isaac; Peterson, C.J.; 1848.]

As William Henry Harrison reported later of Isaac Shelby’s Kentucky troops’ actions to his right, “The American backwoodsmen ride better in the woods than any other people….”

“I heard a heavy firing of musketry and shortly after saw our dragoons retreating together with the limber of the six-pounder, placed on the left of the first line,’ wrote Lieutenant Richard Bullock, commander of the Grenadier Company. “About a minute afterward, I observed that line retreating in confusion, followed closely by the enemy’s cavalry, who were galloping down the road. That portion of the first line which had escaped the enemy’s cavalry retreated behind the second line which stood fast and fired an irregular volley to the right and left, which appeared to check the enemy.”

Militia Order of Isaac Shelby of July 31, 1813
Militia Order of July 31, 1813

Despite the determination of the British to hold fast, the charge by the Kentuckians was too strong. It was one of only two such cavalry charges in the War of 1812. Of the British troops who fought against Shelby’s company, 50 escaped and 477 surrendered.

The action on the American left, against the Indians, took longer and was more hazardous than the fight against the Redcoats, the Americans in this group riding into battle with each man carrying a rifle, a hatchet and a knife.

At one point, many of the troops to the left were on foot and were fighting the Indians hand to hand, knife to knife.

Isaac Shelby's Medal
Isaac Shelby’s Medal

Sixty-six year old Isaac Shelby saw what was happening and rushed forward with his sword raised, shouting, “Surrender! Surrender! It’s no use resisting.” They surrendered.

“The enthusiasm with which the volunteers of Kentucky rallied to the defense of their country in the summer of 1813, is to be attributed in a great measure to the influence of Isaac Shelby, the venerable Governor of that state. He joined the army of Harrison with four thousand Kentuckians, and fought in person, at the age of sixty-three, in the battle of the Thames. For his valuable services in this campaign, Congress, on the 4th of April, 1818, voted him a gold medal.”

[Military Heroes of the War of 1812; Shelby, Evan; Peterson, C.J.; 1848.]

Evan Shelby (2nd cousin, 7 times removed)

Evan Shelby served as Aide-de-Camp to Governor Isaac Shelby in the Upper Canada campaign.

Marquis Shelby (2nd cousin, 7 times removed)

War of 1812 Service Record of Marquis D. Shelby
Did my children’s ancestors fight on both sides of the War of 1812?

Marquis de Lafayette Shelby was Sergeant in Nixon’s Regiment, Captain Washington Darden’s Detachment of the Mississippi Territory Militia under Colonel George H. Nixon.

Cadwallader, General Thomas (3rd cousin, 10 times removed)

“During the war of 1812 he was a lieutenant-colonel of cavalry, and he was afterward appointed to command the advanced light-brigade. Under General Cadwalader’s training these troops became remarkable for their efficiency and discipline. In 1812 he was appointed major-general of the 1st division of Pennsylvania militia. private soldier in a cavalry troop, and was one of the ringleaders of the insurrection.”

[Famous American Biographies, online http://famousamericans.net/thomascadwalader/]

Adams, John Quincy, Future President of the United States (16th cousin, 6 times removed)

In 1809, John Quincy Adams was sent by the President to be the representative of the United States to Russia. His arrival coincided with the Tsar’s decision to break with Napoleon.

As a result, Adams was well received.

At the outset of the War of 1812, he was still at St Petersburg and in September of that year, the Tsar offered to act as mediator in the conflict. The President accepted his offer and sent James Bayard and Albert Gallatin to act as commissioners with Mr Adams, but England wanted none of it.

In August of 1814, however, these men, Henry Clay and Jonathan Russell, started to negotiate with English commissioners, resulting in the signing of the Treaty of Ghent on the 24th of December of that year, effectively ending the War of 1812.


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Getting the most from Library and Archives Canada databases.

Getting the most from Library and Archives Canada databases.

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The wealth of information on the Library and Archives Canada website has become more easily searchable over the years as more and more indexing has occurred.

 

Albert Joseph Philias Emery died March 1, 1916 at Vimy Ridge.
My great uncle, Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery was MIA (believed killed) during advance preparations for the advance on Vimy Ridge.

As one who is very familiar with and has used this site for years, I have found it to be so extensive that I make sure to bookmark any pages I would like to examine further so I can find them again later.

At one time, it was almost impossible to find them again otherwise.

The site has since added  an “Ancestors Search” to enable searching several of the site’s databases in one step, in addition to more targeted searches of specific databases.

Some things to remember when searching large sites and databases are:

  • Remember to use wild cards and the soundex features in your searches as transcription errors are very common due to the quality of the archived documents, handwriting, etc.
  • Middle names or nicknames may have been used routinely, especially since children were frequently named after parents or other family members and this was the best way to differentiate between individuals.
  • Language barriers and miscommunication sometimes resulted in surnames and given names being anglicized or simplified.
  • Those recording data and/or completing documentation frequently resorted to phonetic spelling because they were much less educated.
  • After widowhood, separation, divorce and sometimes even during marriage, a woman could sometimes be listed by her maiden name.
  • It was not uncommon for individuals to not know their own birth date, immigration date, etc. leaving gaps in data or in the worst cases, providing erroneous information.

This link is one of numerous included in my “Favorite Research Links” in the lower sidebar – along with several others from the Library and Archives Canada site that I have also listed below for your information.

Library and Archives Canada

  • Ancestors Search
  • Books of Remembrance
  • Databases
  • Canada’s Digital Collections
  • Genealogy Index
  • War and Military

If you have Canadian ancestors, it’s well worth your while to check out this site.


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Indecipherable inscriptions on centuries old tombstones revealed using 3D technology.

Indecipherable inscriptions on centuries old tombstones revealed using 3D technology.

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Stuart, Erin and Alan Melanson in graveyard.
Erin and Stuart sit through an enthralling tale told by fellow ‘Melanson’ cousin, Alan Melanson.

This new technology is so very exciting to me. I’ve found that the information that proves to be most valuable from tombstones is that found on those from before 1850.

After 1850, most of the information is available in accessible records. Although there are records prior to 1850, the information on them is minimal at best. The earlier US censuses are the best example because the censuses prior only provide the full name of the head of the family and age ranges of spouses, children and others. This leaves a wide margin for error that is much narrower in later censuses that reveal names, ages, birth years, immigration data, occupations and relationships to the head of the household.

In a previous post, I described the fun my family and I had ‘tombstone hunting’ in Nova Scotia. We made a point of stopping at as many graveyards as possible and taking photos and transcriptions of the tombstones that had related surnames. The most memorable graveyard we visited was that of the well known “Graveyard Tour” at Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. Our tour guide was a fellow Melanson family member and his knack of weaving entertaining and enthralling stories was evident as he led us through the maze of tombstones, recounting the most scandalous and mysterious tales. Several of these tombstones from the 1600s and 1700s were unreadable and this new 3D technology seems to be the answer to discovering and recording many of the actual transcriptions.

Grant Aylesworth, a Mount Allison anthropology professor, and the Government of New Brunswick’s archaeological services division are now reading the inscriptions on those illegible grave markers from the 1700s, using this new 3D software technology. The software derives the inscriptions from digital images of these tombstones. The innovative technology is freely available and is easy to learn and implement, although attempts are being made to streamline the process to encourage others to explore these old tombstones and recover as many inscriptions as possible.


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Researching Welsh Quakers in Pennsylvania.

Researching Welsh Quakers in Pennsylvania.

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Welsh Quaker ancestors are the cultural group from which the majority of the ancestors of my children originate (on my husband’s side).

 

One of the benefits of researching this culture is that the people were religious, often educated (could read and write) and were very good at documenting vital statistics and events. As a result, there are several very good written resources available that directly cite or are based upon this documented data.

The following are valuable, highly informational links to texts and websites focusing on Welsh Quaker pioneers in Pennsylvania.

 

Texts

William Penn
William Penn

Websites


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Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

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Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

 

WOGAMAN, BURKETT, HOLDERY

Author:     Ezra McFall Kuhns
Publisher:     [Dayton, Ohio? : s.n., 1948]
Series:      Genealogy & local history, G7296.

BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT
(First Page)

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery

It has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1743, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley, Jehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners”. Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects, Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coin

BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT
(Second Page)

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery

cidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of this life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina, who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27, 1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13, 1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett, of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. It should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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British Ancestry: a mixture of genetic DNA from other populations.

British Ancestry: a mixture of genetic DNA from other populations.

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Genetic signatures have been found among Britons that strongly illustrate their historical roots from various locations of the UK, resulting in a highly detailed and descriptive map of genetic variations. The analysis shows clusters of genetic variation within the late 1800s, when the population was less migratory, and reflects historical waves of migration by a variety of groups of people into the island.

 

According to Peter Donnelly, the Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in Oxford, England, “The patterns we see are extraordinary. “The genetic effects we’re looking at are the result of, probably, thousands of years of history.”

DNA Map of UK migration.
Each symbol represents an individual at the center of their grandparents’ birthplaces. The tree (top right) DNA map of UK migration shows how the clusters are related. Photo credit: University of Oxford

Today, few Britons have ancestors from only one region of the United Kingdom. Therefore, it’s difficult to find patterns of genetic variation originating from a specific place.

However, the team found Britons that lived in rural areas and knew that their grandparents were all born within less than eighty kilometers. Since the DNA of these people was a blend of their grandparents’ DNA, it was expected that their genetic variations would be from within the geographic regions of their grandparents.

Participants were lumped into groups based specifically on their genetic DNA, and the geography of these groups matched significantly. Those from across central and southern Britain were in the most important cluster. Several groupings within this main group were much more isolated.

Those whose ancestry can be traced back to the archipelago, off the northeast coast of Scotland, fell into three distinct classes. This isolation most likely was a result of the islands creating difficulties in movement among various populations.

As well as the influence of geographic barriers, the overall picture resulted from migrations into and around the UK.

Genomes of people from continental Europe were analysed to gain insight into the scope of their ancestors’ contributions to Britons’ genetic ancestry. The flow of Anglo-Saxons from contemporary Germany into the UK after the departure of the Romans in 410 AD was indicated. Rather than displacing the resident population, they interbred.

Surprisingly, the Vikings, who occupied the UK during the four centuries from 700 AD to 1100 AD, had very little influence on the genetic makeup of Britons.

Britons or those with British heritage may conceivably use their DNA to trace the homelands of their ancestors.

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Sources:

Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.

Callaway, Ewan; UK Mapped out by genetic ancestry; http://www.nature.com/news/uk-mapped-out-by-genetic-ancestry-1.17136


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Transcription – In Memoriam for Benoît Tardif (1919-2003)

Transcription – In Memoriam for Benoît Tardif (1919-2003)

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Transcription – In Memoriam for Benoît Tardif (1919-2003)

 

Benoît Tardif

In Memoriam and obituary for Benoit Tardif.
In Memoriam and obituary for Benoit Tardif.

époux de

feu Étianne Perreault

décédé le 20 septembre 2003
à l’âge de 83 ans et 9 mois
et inhumé le 23 septembre 2003
à Saints-Anges

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The complete original scans of the documents clips above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.


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Transcription – In Memoriam and Obituary for Benoît Tardif (1919-2003)

Transcription – In Memoriam and Obituary for Benoît Tardif (1919-2003)

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Transcription – In Memoriam and Obituary for Benoît Tardif (1919-2003)

 

Obituary for Benoit Tardif.
Obituary for Benoit Tardif.

TARDIF Benoît

A l’hôpital Laval de Québec, le 20 septembre 2003, à l’âge de 83 ans et 9 mois, est dcédé M. Benoît Tardif, époux de feu Étianne Perreault. Il demaurait à Saints-Anges. Les funérailles ont eu lieu mardi le 23 septembre 2003 à 11h en l’église de Saints-Anges et de la au cimetière paroissial. La direction des funérailles a té confiée à la maison funéraire Nouvelle Vie Inc., St-Joseph. Il laisse dans le deuil ses enfants; Françoise (feu Jean-Guy Pouliot, Rolland Gagné), Roch (Jocelyne Faucher), Marthe, Pierre (Gisèle Turmel), feu Pierrette (Marcel Turmel, Estelle Berthiaume), feu Christiane (Aimé Drouin), Jean (Denise Lessard), Lucie (Renaud Poulin), Marie (Yves Thériault), feu Danielle (Pierre Poulin), ses 17 petits-enfants et 5 arrière-petits-enfants; il était le frère de feu Juliette (feu Adonias Perreault), feu Julien (Rita Grégoire), Paul-Émile (Denise Fecteau), il était le beau-frère de: feu Adélard (feu Adouilda Courtemanche), feu Alberta (feu Albert Vaillancourt), feu Yvonne (feu Joseph Grégoire), feu Gédéon (Rosa Vachon), feu Robert (Lucienne Bisson), feu Marie-Rose (Raymond Drouin, Cécile Perreault), feu Albert (feu Madeleine Doyon), feu Agathe (feu Adrien Tardif), feu Michel (Éloise Poulin); il laisse également dans le deuil plusieurs cousins, cousines, neveux, nièces et ami(e)s. Ses enfants remercient sincèrement tous les parents et ami(e)s qu ont mainfesté des marques de sympathie et d¸amitié soit par des offrandes de messes, cartes de sympathie, affiliations de prières, cons, fleurs, visites à la résidence funéraire et assistance aux funérailles. Que tous trouvent ici l’èxpression de notre reconnaissance et considerent ces remer-…. (this portion missing)

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The complete original scans of the documents clips above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.

 


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Remains of Blanch Mortimer, daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer found.

Remains of Blanch Mortimer, daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer found.

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I was surprised to read today that the remains of Blanch Mortimer, the daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer have been found.

 

I was shocked to read today that the remains of Blanch Mortimer, the daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer.
The effigy on the tomb of Blanch Mortimer, the daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer.

In a previous post, I described our genealogical relationship to Sir Roger Mortimer, outlining the most infamous aspects of his life, including his hanging at Tyburn Tree for treason.

Blanch Mortimer, who died in 1347, was entombed at St. Bartholomew’s Church in Much Markle and her remains were uncovered in October of 2014.

Admittedly, this news has actually been out for a while, but it is new to me, and I’m excited to read anything about our family’s ancestors.

The find was made during work to restore the church. It was decided to keep the find quiet to enable tests to be conducted and to make her secure once again.

Blanche Mortimer; Tomb
The tomb in which the remains of Blanch Mortimer lie.

According to Reverend Howard Mayell, vicar of the parish, there wasn’t much left in the coffin, so it’s impossible to be absolutely certain the remains are those of Blanch, but it is believed they are hers.

Blanch’s tomb is topped with an effigy. Although it was not originally clear what was lying beneath, upon further exploration and removal of the stone panels from the front of the memorial, they discovered it was a lead coffin.

It is extremely unusual to find a coffin within a tomb. Usually, the tomb itself is empty and the body is buried beneath.

The remains were subjected to an endoscopic examination to preclude opening the coffin, adhering to archaeological practice and the policy of the Church of England that remains should be disturbed as little as possible.

Sources:

  1. BBC News; Hereford and Worcester; “Blanch Mortimer: ‘Remains’ of medieval traitor’s daughter found,” http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-hereford-worcester-25932288.
  2. Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

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The following is a transcription of a biography of Jehu Burkett and his family, taken from the publication, “BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT.”

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 1

 

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 2

lt has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1745, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley. ]ehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners.” Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects,.Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, as there is an entry in the Army accounts “of that state which would indicate that he was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coincidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of his life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina,“ who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27,1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13,1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David and Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. lt should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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I’m related to Ellen Degeneres and Madonna?

I’m related to Ellen Degeneres and Madonna?

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What a shock to find out that I and the rest of my family are related to Ellen Degeneres and Madonna!

I was reviewing old genealogy articles to find story and post ideas and hit the jackpot with this one. In an article by CanWest News Service’s Randy Boswell from March of 2010, he recounts the relationship between Madonna and Ellen Degeneres.

View of the entrance to La Rochelle harbour in 1628.
La Rochelle harbour circa 1628.

Mr. Boswell states that they are eleventh cousins, descending from the same 10th great-grandfather, Martin Aucoin, from La Rochelle, France. It is unclear whether he ever immigrated to Acadia, but his two daughters Michelle and Jeanne were both living in Port Royal after 1641.

Relationship Chart - Christine Blythe to Martin Aucoin
I find out that I and the rest of my family are related to Ellen Degeneres and Madonna!

As you can see in the relationship chart below showing my descent from the same original ancestor, my branch descends through his daughter Michelle, who married Michel Boudrot in Port Royal in 1641.

In a later generation, my 6th great-grandfather, Charles Mellanson married Anne Bourg in 1701. Anne being the great-granddaughter of the original Martin Aucoin, all subsequent descendants of Charles Mellanson were also direct descendants of Martin Aucoin.

Finding family connections with noted people from history is one thing, but nothing beats the fun of finding connections to living celebrities, personalities, politicians, royalty, etc. Another connection I recently wrote about was that of my husband to Barack Obama, both being directly descended from Ulrich Stehle, who was 6th great-grandfather to Mark and 7th great-grandfather to Barack Obama.

Biography of Martin Aucoin and his daughters Michelle and Jeanne.

Martin Aucoin was born before 1619 in La Rochelle, France and married firstly, Barbe Minguet and secondly, Marie Salle (daughter of Denys Salle and Françoise Arnaud) after 1630. Martin and Barbe Minguet had the following children:

Michelle “Michele” Aucoin was born about 1621 in France and married Michel Boudrot (born about 1600 in France) in 1641 at Port Royal. Michel had immigrated to Acadia from France before 1639. The 1671 Acadian census is listed as a farmer in Port Royal, owning 20 cattle, 12 sheep, 8 arpents of land. In 1678, again at Port Royal, he owned 12 acres, 10 cattle, 3 guns. In 1686, Michel was a Lt. General of the Jurisdiction of Port Royal  and is shown in the census of that year owning 3 guns, 20 arpents, 16 cattle, 17 sheep, 6 hogs. According to the 1693 Acadian census, she was a widow living in Port Royal and owned 20 cattle, 18 sheep, 12 hogs, 25 arpents, and 1 gun. She died on December 17, 1706 at the age of 85 and was buried on 18 Dec 1706 in St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal. Michelle Aucoin and Michel Boudrot had the following children:

  1. Françoise Boudrot, born about 1642 in Port Royal, married Etienne Robichaud about 1663 and died in 1714 at the age of 72.
  2. Jeanne Boudrot was born about 1650 in Port Royal and married Bonaventure “Venture” Terriau (son of Jean Terriau and Perrine Rau) about 1666. She died on May 8, 1710 at the age of 60 in Port Royal and was buried the next day in St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal.
  3. Charles Boudrot was born about 1649 in Port Royal and married Renée Bourg (daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry) about 1672. He later married Marie Corporon about 1686. Charles died after 1714 at the age of 65 in Pisiquit.
  4. Marguerite Boudrot is my 7th great-grandmother and was born about 1648 in Port Royal. She married firstly, Jean Babineau, who was born about 1652 in Acadia. Secondly, she married François Bourg (my 7th great-grandfather)  about 1665. Marguerite died in 1718 as records show her burial on November 9, 1718 in St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal.
  5. Marie Boudrot was born about 1650 in Port Royal and lived in Beaubassin, Acadia between 1693 and 1700. Marie married Michel Poirier (son of Jean Poirier and Jeanne Chebrat) about 1673 in Port Royal.
  6. Jean “Jehan” Boudrot was born about 1655 in Port Royal and married Marguerite Bourgeois (daughter of Jacques Bourgeois and Jeanne Trahan) about 1676. He died on November 30, 1679 at the age of 24 in Port Royal.
  7. Abraham Boudrot was born about 1656 in Port Royal. In about 1685 in Port Royal, he married Cécile (Anne) Melanson (daughter of Charles Mellanson and Marie Dugas). He died in 1700 or 1701 at the age of 44 in Port Royal.
  8. Michel Boudrot was born about 1659 in Port Royal. He married Marie-Madeleine Cormier (daughter of Thomas Cormier and Marie-Madeleine Girouard) about 1690 and he died on February 13, 1714 at the age of 55, also in Port Royal.
  9. Olivier Boudrot was born about 1661 in Port Royal. About 1686, he married Isabelle Petitpas.
  10. Claude Boudrot was born about 1663 in Port Royal. He married Anne-Marie Thibodeau (daughter of Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Terriau) about 1682 in Port Royal and died on March 7, 1740 at the age of 77 in Grand Pré.

Jeanne Aucoin was born November 23, 1630 in La Rochelle, Charente-Maritime, France and was baptized on November 26, 1630 in Ste-Marguerite Parish, La Rochelle, France. She married François “la varanne, le pere” Girouard about 1616 in France and immigrated with him to Acadian sometime before 1671. She appears first in the census of 1671 with her husband, who is shown to be a farmer in Port Royal, owning 16 cattle, 6 sheep and 8 arpents of land; in 1678 he owned 16 acres and 18 cattle; and in 1686 he owned 1 gun, 5 arpents of land, 13 cattle, 16 sheep and 8 hogs. In the 1693 census, Jeanne was a widow living in Port Royal and she owned 20 cattle, 40 sheep, 10 hogs, 20 arpents of land and 2 guns. The 1700 Acadian census shows Jeanne owning 15 cattle, 34 sheep, 20 arpents of land and 2 guns She died April 16,  1718 at the age of 87 and was buried April 18, 1718 in St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal. Jeanne Aucoin and François Girouard had six children:

  1. Marie Girouard, born about 1651 in Port Royal.
  2. Marie-Madeleine Girouard was born about 1653 in Port Royal and married Thomas François Cormier, son of Robert Cormier and Marie Peraud.
  3. Germain Girouard was born about 1656 in Port Royal. He married Marie Bourgeois (daughter of Jacques Bourgeois and Jeanne Trahan) on June 9, 1680 in Beaubassin and he died March 7, 1741 at the age of 90 in Beaubassin.
  4. Jacques Girouard was born about 1658 in Port Royal.
  5. Charlotte “Anne” Girouard, born about 1660 in Port Royal, married Julien “dit La Montagne” Lord sometime before 1678. She died before 1712 at the age of 52.
  6. Anne Girouard was born about 1671 in Port Royal.

Sources:

  1. 1671 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  2. 1678 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  3. 1686 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  4. 1693 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  5. 1698 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  6. 1700 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  7. 1701 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  8. 1752 Acadian Census, (N.p.: n.p., n.d.). Annotation.
  9. Michael B. Melanson, “Melanson – Melancon: Genealogy of an Acadian and Cajun Family”, (Dracut, Massachusetts: Lanesville Publishing, 2004).
  10. “Origins of the Pioneers of Acadia”, Stephen A. White online (http://www.acadian-home.org/frames.html).
  11. H. George Friedman Jr., “Aucoin Genealogy,” database, H. George Friedman, Jr., Aucoin Genealogy (http://www.cs.uiuc.edu/homes/friedman/genealogy/Aucoin.htm) .
  12. Stephen A. White, (http://www.cs.uiuc.edu/homes/friedman/genealogy/Aucoin.htm) (Université de Moncton: Centre d’Études Acadiennes, 1999).
  13. Donald J. Hébert, “Southwest Louisiana Records” (N.p.: Hébert Publications, n.d.).
  14. Donald J. Hébert, “Acadian Families in Exile – 1785” (N.p.: Hébert Publications, n.d.).
  15. “Baptiste Was Said to Have a Wife in Every Port”, Clarence-J. d’Entremont online (http://www.museeacadien.ca/english/archives/articles/11.htm).
  16. “Marriage Records of St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia,” database, Nova Scotia Archives (http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/acadian).
  17. “Baptism Records of St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia,” database, Nova Scotia Archives (http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/acadian).
  18. “Burial Records of St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia,” database, Nova Scotia Archives (http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/acadian).
  19. “Dictionary of Canadian Biography,” database, (http://www.biographi.ca/index-e.html?PHPSESSID=2s8g2h8iihpptgqhu0fltdmb63).
  20. “The Seizure of ‘The Pembroke’ by the Acadians”, Clarence-J. d’Entremont online (http://www.museeacadien.ca/english/archives/articles/56.htm).
  21. “She Presided Over Councils of War Against her Kindred”, Clarence-J. d’Entremont online (http://www.museeacadien.ca/english/archives/articles/12.htm).
  22. “Baptiste, The Rascal”, Clarence-J. d’Entremont online (http://www.museeacadien.ca/english/archives/articles/10.htm).

 


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