Category: Z-Current

Transcription: Daily Citizen of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin Obituary for Ruth Halbman

Transcription: Daily Citizen of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin Obituary for Ruth Halbman

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Obituary for Ruth Halbman

Ruth Halbman ObituaryDaily Citizen
Beaver Dam
August 1, 1996

Ruth Halbman

Ruth Halbman, 91, a resident of Hillside Manor, Beaver Dam, died Tuesday, July 30, 1996 at Hillside Manor.

The funeral will be Thursday, August 1, at 10 a.m. at the Murray Community Funeral Home, Beaver Dam. The Rev. David Peters will officiate. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery, Beaver Dam.

Mrs. Halbman was born March 3, 1905 in Beaver Dam, daughter of George and Eleanor (Jacobs) Keefer. She was married to Lloyd Halbman on June 30, 1946 in Beaver Dam.

She resided in Beaver Dam all of her life, worked at Weyenberg Shoe Co., Beaver Dam, for 35 years, and was a member of Grace Presbyterian Church, Beaver Dam.

Survivors include one sister, Erlyne Eisenbarth of Beaver Dam; two nephews, Don (Phyllis) Keefer and Hubert Keefer, both of Goleta, Calif.; grandnieces, grandnephews, other relatives and friends.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband,  Lloyd; one brother, Herbert Keefer; one brother-in-law, Delbert Eisenbarth.

Friends may call on Thursday, Aug. 1, from 9:30 a.m. to the time of service, at the Murray Community Funeral Home, Beaver Dam.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Ruth Halbman of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

Transcription: Obituary for Ruth Halbman of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

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Obituary for Ruth Halbman

Ruth Halbman ObituaryRuth Halbman

BEAVER DAM – Ruth Halbman,  91, a resident of Hillside Manor in Beaver Dam, died on Tuesday, July 30, 1996, at the manor.

Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday at the Murray Community Funeral Home in Beaver Dam with the Rev. David Peters officiating. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery, Beaver Dam.

Friends and relatives may call to pay their respects at the funeral home Thursday from 9:30 a.m. until the time of the service.

The former Ruth Keefer was born March 3, 1905 in Beaver Dam, daughter of George and Eleanor (Jacobs) Keefer. She married Lloyd Halbman in Beaver Dam on June 30, 1946. He preceded her in death.

Halbman had lived in Beaver  Dam all of her life. She had been employed at Weyenberg Shoe Company in Beaver Dam for 35 years and was a member of Grace Presbyterian Church.

Surviving are a sister, Erlyne Eisenbarth of Beaver Dam; two nephews; grandnieces and grandnephews, other relatives and friends.

She was further preceded in death by her parents and a brother, Herbert.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Prince William’s mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry?

Prince William’s mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry?

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My children’s ancestry branches backward into history, through Welsh Quakers immigrants in Pennsylvania, to Welsh royalty and then to British royalty, including Prince William. It was surprising to learn Prince William’s mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry?

 

Prince William's mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry?
Prince William’s mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry?

The result of these connections is that my husband and children are distantly related (20th cousins 4 times removed from Princes William and Harry, the sons of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, and the grandsons of the current Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth II.

It is interesting to note that, not only are the young royals connected through German, Spanish, French and numerous other lineages, but DNA tests conducted by BritainsDNA have proven Indian ancestry through their mother Princess Diana.

Although its is believed that Eliza Kewar, their fifth great grandmother was Armenian,  DNA shows a direct maternal Indian descent. Eliza was housekeeper to and in a relationship with Theodore Forbes. Forbes was from Scotland and worked for the East India Company in Surat, India.

The mitochondrial DNA, which is passed on through the women only, descended through Eliza and Theodore’s daughter Katherine and her female descendants to Frances Roche, who married Earl Spencer and had a daughter, Lady Diana Spencer – William and Harry’s mother.

photo credit: Steve Rhodes via photopin cc


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Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging.

Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging.

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My two main passions in life are my genealogy research and blogging, and photos and images are essential to the success of both.
Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging.
Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging.

Most of us do this for the love of the craft – and yes, it is a craft that takes a great deal of talent, research, and knowledge of available resources to make it work.

For all my knowledge, my efforts barely make enough to pay the overhead, which can be considerable, even though I’m an advanced user and can perform most IT, SEO and other tasks myself. There is not much income left over for myself, so I must seek out as many free tools and resources as I can find.

The following is just a brief description of the image search tools I have used – and many I still do use.

One of the tools I recommend using to increase readership and minimize bounces is to use the highest quality images possible.

This can be rather difficult considering the confusion regarding copyright restrictions, licensing, and available image repositories.

Photodropper

In the beginning I used the Photodropper plugin and liked it, but sometimes the quality of the images left a lot to be desired.

I remained loyal, however, until each update made it more and more difficult to find anything but licensed images requiring payment. These images were definitely at the forefront of every search.

Browser Image Search Add-on.

I also tried the image search add-on for my browser, but found this to be a total waste of time as there was no way of filtering the searches or telling at a glance whether they were free or if they were under license restrictions.

Image Sites

Wikipedia main page image.Since I started taking on guest authors, I’ve taken notice of the quality of the images they submit and two companies stood out for me.

They are pixabay.com and photopin.com.

The searches are not contaminated with restrictions and costly images and the browsing is easy and straightforward. I’ve also been impressed with the variety and quality of images available.

Wikipedia.org

Another resource I use regularly is Wikipedia.org.

Image more details link window.

Many of the images on this site are available for use with some licensing restrictions detailed on the image’s Wikimedia Commons page.

Image more details window.

This can be reached by clicking on the image, then clicking the “More Details” button on the lower right.

Most of these images require only the inclusion of a photo license statement, which I always include at the very bottom of my posts.

Search Engine Image Searches

The two largest resources available are probably the least used because of the issues and confusion surrounding copyright.

They are Google and Bing image searches.

A keyword’s search shows no indicators of cost or license restrictions in the results.

This is easily resolved by using the search filters available on both sites.

First, search using the keyword on the main search page, then click on the Images link in the menu at the top of the page, and then use the filters drop-downs at the top of the page to search through numerous categories, including licensing and use restrictions.

Below are screenshots of the dropdowns from each of the Google and Bing image searches.

Image searches
Google image searches.
Bing Image Search Filters
Bing Image Search Filters

I used to use Microsoft Office’s clipart and image gallery regularly, but a while back, Microsoft discontinued this site.

Microsoft Office’s clipart and image library are now available through Bing’s image search.


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Transcription: Obituary for Carl W. Kiefer

Transcription: Obituary for Carl W. Kiefer

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The following is my transcription of the obituary for Carl W. Kiefer.

 

Carl W. Kiefer

Obituary for Carl W. Kiefer.
Obituary for Carl W. Kiefer.

A resident of Painesville since 1910, Carl W. Kiefer, 93, died Friday morning at the Homestead 2 Nursing Home, Painesville, after a lingering illness.

Mr. Kiefer had lived at 7 North Park Place, Painesville. He was born June 29, 1862  in Cleveland.

Until his retirement, he had been office manager of the Frank Stanton Ford firm in Painesville and had also worked for the C.J. Wadsworth Clothing Cabinet Co.

Mr. Kiefer was a member of the Painvesville United Methodist Church, Elks Lodge No. 549 in Painesville, and the Painesville Kiwanis Club.

He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. William (Helen) Blackmore of Cleveland Heights; sister Mrs. Ella Sweet of Monroe, Mich., four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his first wife Mary Beth in 1958, his second wife Marie earlier this year, and a son John C.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Monday at the Johnson Funeral Home, 368 Mentor Ave., Painesville. Dr. Alva W. Taylor of the Painesville United Methodist Church will officiate. Burial will be in Riverside Cemetery.

Calling hours will be from noon until 2 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Blyth, Commissioned Officers of the Royal Navy, Bloye – Blyth

Transcription: Blyth, Commissioned Officers of the Royal Navy, Bloye – Blyth

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Blyth – Commissioned Officers of the Royal Navy

 

Blyth - Commissioned Officers
Blyth – Commissioned Officers

79

BLOYE, Robert
L 2 Oct. 1800
CR 4 Aug. 1806
CA 23 Sept. 1813
d

BLOYS, William
L
CA 27 Aug. 1697
d 9 Aug. 1720

BLUETT, Buckland Stirling
L 24 Nov. 1800
CR 10 Apr. 1804
CA 12 Aug. 1812
d

BLUETT, John
L 1 Apr. 1779
d 7 Dec. 1793

BLUETT, John Courtnay
L 28 Feb. 1815
d

BLUETT, Richard
L 7 May 1800
d

BLUNDEN, Christopher
L 12 Aug. 1800
d

BLURTON, George
L 7 Feb. 1812
d

BLYKE, George (? Blyte, q.v.
L
CR 3 Nov. 1747
(from seniority
9 Mar. 1748
d 14 July 1797

BLYTE, George (? BLYKE, q.v.
L 22 June 1743
d

BLYTH, Alexander
L 14 Apr. 1741
d

BLYTH, Joseph
L 17 Dec. 1798
d

BLYTH, Samuel
L 7 Feb. 1806
CR 5 Sept. 1811
d

BLYTHE, John
L 22 Jan. 1806
d

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Dr. A. D. Warner; Geauga County, Ohio

Transcription: Obituary for Dr. A. D. Warner; Geauga County, Ohio

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Obituary of Dr. A. D. Warner
Obituary of Dr. A. D. Warner

The following is my transcription of the obituary for Dr. A. D. Warner of Geauga County, Ohio.

 

Dr. A. D.Warner Taken By Death
_________

Dr. A. D. Warner, a prominent and life-long resident of Geauga county, passed away at his home in Burton, O., Saturday at the age of 78 years.

He was born at Chester, O., October 23, 1816 and married to Phila Belle Dines in 1868. To this union were born three children, Elmer of Cleveland, Wilbur of Burton and Harold of Painesville, Mrs. Warner died in 1898.

The deceased leaves besides the present widow and three sons, four grand-children and a host of friends to mourn their loss.

Masonic funeral services will be held from the Congregational church at Burton, O., Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock. Burial will be made in Briar Hill cemetery.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Ohio Death Records, Kirby – Kirk, Page 871

Transcription: Ohio Death Records, Kirby – Kirk, Page 871

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The following is my transcription of the Ohio Death Records for Kirby – Kirk, page 871.

 

John Wesley Kirk Death Record
Ohio death records index listing John Wesley Kirk.

OHIO DEATH RECORDS, Page 871, Kirby – Kirk

__________________________

Page No. 871
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
DEATH INDEX
NAME OF DECEASED   /   COUNTY/CITY  /  CO.  CITY CODE   /  VOL. NO.   /   CERTIFICATE  /  DATE OF BIRTH  (Mo./Day/Yr.)
Kirby Ada M            Twp        100        10317        21845        4/13/3
Kirby Anne I            Cleve        181        10500        67531        11/16/3
Kirby Blanche B            Cleve        181        10498        67147        11/4/3
Kirby Bridget            Cleve        181        10528        74747        12/21/3
Kirby Bruce            Warren        781        10490        65198        10/25/3
Kirby Cynthia Ann        Twp        880        10312        20642        3/19/3
Kirby Edwin       Elyria       472       10509      69842      11/27/3
Kirby James W Galpols 271 10444 53602 8/8/3
Kirby Lawrence H Lakewd 182 10501 67957 11/22/3
Kirby Rachael Jane Vil 830 10449 53156 8/26/3

Kirby Webster L        Twp        830        10255        6261        1/8/3
Kirchdorfer Elmer O        Twp        570        10388        39609        6/24/3
Kirchenhauer Edwin F        Twp        810        10315        21340        3/28/3
Kirchendorfer Evelyn        Cleve        181        10493        65886        10/29/3
Kirchner Anna E        Akron        771        10253        5809        1/5/3
Kirchner Emma            Cleve        181        10319        22348        4/3/3
Kirchner George Mason    Stebvil        411        10540        77543        12/22/3
Kirchner Hazel F        Akron        771        10489        64970        10/17/3
Kirchner Herman Geo        Cols        251        10238        2093        1/5/3
Kirchschlager Fredrick        Twp        450        10420        47638        7/21/3
Kiriakidis Stiliano        Cleve        181        10527        74388        12/11/3
Kirian William            Toledo        481        10483        63257        10/1/3
Kirk Alice Lee            Cols        251        10452        55704        9/2/3
Kirk Andrew S            Toledo        481        10483        63257        10/1/3
Kirk Anna L            Salem        152        10447        54391        9/11/3
Kirk Benjamin            Cleve        181        10499        67446        11/13/3
Kirk Cilla            Cleve        181        10349        29993        5/20/3
Kirk Cora Bee            Cinti        311        10455        56414        9/16/3
Kirk Cordelia            Akron        771        10552        80540        12/13/3
Kirk Effie Anne            Twp        300        10240        2682        1/1/3
Kirk Genevieve Theresa    Lakewd        182        10237        1827        1/10/3
Kirk Harold E            Toledo        481        10359        32440        5/31/3
Kirk Harriet A            Cleve        181        10426        49015        8/13/3
Kirk Henry Reigle        Vil        10        10421        47890        8/23/3
Kirk James Thos        Bexley        252        10240        2501        1/19/3
Kirk John Wesley        Twp        120        10443        53476        8/17/3
Kirk Mary Eleanor        Vil        230        10476        61546        10/31/3
Kirk Patrick F            Oakwood    572        10306        19105        3/24/3
Kirk Phoebe            Cols        251        10404        43729        7/27/3
Kirk Richard            Vil        310        10256        6682        1/25/3
Kirk Roy E            Cosh        161        10525        73806        12/23/3

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription – Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott

Transcription – Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott

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The following is my transcription of the death certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott, wife to Samuel G. Ott, of Canal Fulton, Ohio.

DEATH CERTIFICATE OF Rebecca Ann Ott

Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott
Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott

STATE OF OHIO
BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

1    PLACE OF DEATH
County   Portage    Registration District No.   1058        File No.
Township                                     Primary Registration District No.   8415    Registered No.   44255
or Village           No.     ,                                      St.,                                                  Ward
or City of   Kent, Ohio    (If death occurred in a hospital or institution, give its NAME  instead of street and number)

2    FULL NAME   Rebecca Ann  Ott
(a)    Residence.    No.              St.,                                            Ward
(Usual place of abode)                    (If nonresident, give city or town and State)
Length of residence in city or town where death occurred                 yrs.             mos.             ds.    How long in  U.S., if of foreign birth?                 yrs.              mos.            ds.

PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS

3    SEX                               4    COLOR OR RACE                          5    SINGLE, MARRIED, WIDOWED or DIVORCED (write the word)                          5a    If married, widowed or divorced
Female                                 White                                                      Married                                                                                                                                           HUSBAND of    Samuel G. Ott
(or) WIFE of

6    DATE OF BIRTH (month, day, and yer)    Jan. 2nd, 1846
7    AGE                Years                Months                 Days        If LESS than 1 day               hrs. or                 min.
8    OCCUPATION OF DECEASED
(a)    Trade, profession or particular kind of work         Housewife
(b)    General nature of Industry, business, or establishment in which employed (or employer)
(c)    Name of employer
9    BIRTHPLACE (city or town)        Canal Fulton        State or country    O
PARENTS
10    NAME OF FATHER    Joseph Kirk
11    BIRTHPLACE OF FATHER (city or town)                    (State or country)    Unknown
12    MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER            Unknown
13    BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER (city or town)        Canal Fulton        (State or country)    Ohio
14    Informant    Samuel G. Ott
(Address)    Canal Fulton, O
15    Filed     8/19, 1922        Frank Bechiter   Registrar

MEDICAL CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

16    DATE OF DEATH (month, day and year)    Aug. 16,  1922
17                                      I HEREBY CERTIFY, that I attended deceased from             , 1917, to Aug. 16th, 1922
that I last saw her alive on July 15th, 1922 and that death occurred, on the date stated above, at 8oo P.m.
The CAUSE OF DEATH* was as follows:    Myxedima     (duration)           yrs.            mos.         ds.
CONTRIBUTORY (secondary)         Unknown        (duration)                     yrs.            mos.         ds.
18    Where was the disease contracted if not at the place of death?
Did an operation precede death?     No        Date of
Was there an autopsy?        No
What test confirmed diagnosis?        Physical exam
(Signed)     Hiram Bessinger, M.D.
Aug. 17th, 1922    (Address)    Canal Fulton, O
State the Disease Causing Death, or in deaths from Violent Causes, state (1) Means and Nature of Injury, and (2) whether Accidental, Suicidal or Homicidal. (See reverse side for additional space.)
19    PLACE OF BURIAL, CREMATION OR REMOVAL            DATE OF BURIAL
Union Cemetery, Canal Fulton, O                                            Aug. 19, 1922
20    UNDERTAKER, License No.                            ADDRESS
The Finefrock Bros. Co.                                     Canal Fulton, O.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Revolutionary War Plaque for Gabriel Steely

Transcription: Revolutionary War Plaque for Gabriel Steely

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The following is a transcription of a plaque recognizing Gabriel Steely as a Revolutionary Soldier.

 

Revolutionary War Plaque for Gabriel Steely
Revolutionary War Plaque for Gabriel Steely

REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER

GABRIEL STEELY

Born Aug. 19, 1763 – Died May 2,  1830

Wife: Mary [Stewart] Steely

Parents of

John Steely, Dr. Meek Steely and Isabella Duncan, of Kingston, Ohio, George Steely and  Sarah Shelby of Covington, Indiana, Reuben Steely and Eliza B. Ray of West Point, Indiana.

Remains removed from farm, about 4 mi. north west, to this place December 2nd 1914, by his great grandson, H.M. Steely of Danville, Illinois.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Revolutionary War Index card for Abel Cadwalader.

Transcription: Revolutionary War Index card for Abel Cadwalader.

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The following is my transcription of the Revolutionary War Index card for Abel Cadwalader.

Transcription of the Revolutionary War Index card for Abel Cadwalader
Revolutionary War Index card for Abel Cadwalader.

Inactive Duty
Militia
Cadwalader, Abel
Rank:
Lieutenancy: Philadelphia County.
Battalion: 1st
Company: 5th, Capt. David Dowlin
Class:
Remarks: “under age, Provd.”
Authority: Nonattendance Account, 1781-1782
Date: N.B.
Muster Fines £
Published:
“Military Accounts: Militia,” Records of the Comptroller General, RG-4
THE BASIC RECORD DOES NOT PROVE ACTIVE DUTY.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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4 stories of hidden treasures you can still look for today.

4 stories of hidden treasures you can still look for today.

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There’s reason to believe you could find a major treasure horde.  After all, there are quite a few still out there just waiting to be unearthed!  Here are just 4 stories of hidden treasures you can still look for today as long as you have a metal detector.

For most metal detectorists, the thrill of the hunt is the driving force behind their metal detecting.   You never know when that signal goes off what you’ll unearth. 

stories of hidden treasures
4 stories of hidden treasures and hordes you can still look for today.

The Treasure of Little Bighorn

During the Battle of Little Bighorn in June 1876 in eastern Montana, a steamboat called the Far West was leased by the government and sent up the Bighorn river to resupply General Custer and his men.

It is said that while Captain Grant Marsh had anchored the ship at the confluence of the Bighorn and Little Bighorn rivers to wait for soldiers to come and unload the supplies, two freighters from Bismark, North Dakota stopped and asked him for help.  They requested that the Far West take on the $800,000 in gold they were carrying because they had just narrowly averted capture by Native Americans several times and were worried if they didn’t hide the gold somewhere it would be stolen.  Although the Captain didn’t want to take on the gold, he did.  Then, he continued to wait for Custer’s soldiers to come and unload the supplies.

As he waited, captain Marsh became nervous about having so much gold on board so he headed upriver to a safer anchorage.  He then took the gold ashore and buried it.

He then returned to the confluence of the two rivers to see if he’d be able to rendezvous with the soldiers.  Unfortunately, instead he received word of Custer’s defeat and was asked to transport the wounded to safety.  With this, the gold was forgotten until the Captain contacted the freighting company several years later.  He even led them to the place he had remembered burying the gold but, the landscape had changed during the time he’d been away and, that $800,000 in gold hasn’t ever been recovered.

Yamashita’s Gold

During WWII Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita and his men stole a great deal of gold and other riches from the countries they invaded.

It is also said that even top officials including the Emperor himself participated in looting during the war.

As the story goes, all of the treasure these high ranking Japanese officials found was stored in Singapore, then relocated to some caves in the Philippines.  The goal was to then transport the treasure from the Philippines to Japan after the war was over, but that was never accomplished.

Some of the treasure is said to have stayed in the Philippines while other portions of it were lost at sea when the merchant ships it was being smuggled in were sunk by Allied forces.  Although many scholars say Yamashita’s treasure is a myth, others believe and they’ve been on the hunt ever since.

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure

Forrest Fenn is a writer and art collector in his late 80’s who lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Back in the 1980’s Fenn was diagnosed with cancer.  He was lucky though, and he beat it.

When he recovered, he was inspired to hide somewhere between $3 – 5 million of his personal treasures including gold, jewels, and priceless artifacts somewhere “north of Santa Fe” and “above 5,000 ft”.

He then wrote his memoir “The Thrill of the Chase” and in it included a poem he wrote that will lead readers to his buried treasure – if they can decode it.

Since then he’s also published another book titled “Too Far to Walk” that includes a map of the area where the treasure is hidden but doesn’t give away the exact location.

So far, no one has found it, but maybe you can be the lucky treasure hunter.

Civil War Treasure in Virginia

Stories of treasures buried during the Civil War abound.  One of the more plausible involves a Confederate Commander named John Singleton Mosby.

In the spring of 1863 Commander Mosby had just finished raiding a Union camp and had over 40 prisoners, one of whom was a Union officer.

The officer had a bag that he had been using to store priceless family heirlooms and artifacts, along with some gold and silver pieces he’d stolen from Virginia families.

Commander Mosby took this bag, estimated to be worth over $350,000, and began heading south with the prisoners back toward Confederate territory in Culpeper, Virginia.

Around New Baltimore, Virginia though, a scout spotted a group of Union soldiers.  To avoid them the scout led the group through the woods.

It is at this point that Commander Mosby became nervous about the heirlooms returning to Union hands so, he and Sergeant James Ames buried them between two trees.  He then marked the two trees with an “X” and they rejoined the group which successfully returned to Confederate territory.

After some time, Commander Mosby asked Ames to return to the site with six of his best men to recover the treasure.

While there, the men were all captured and subsequently hung.

Mosby never returned to claim the treasure though he did speak about it to friends and family on his death bed, saying he wished he could have recovered the treasure so he could return the heirlooms to the families they belonged to.

As you can see with these four stories alone, there’s enough treasure out there for everyone!  

So, grab a professional deep seeking metal detector and head out treasure hunting.

As always, be sure to check the local and national laws before you get started. When metal detecting on private property always obtain written permission from the land owner. You never know what you might dig up – maybe you’ll even find one of these treasures!

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About the author

Michael Bernzweig manages MetalDetector.com in Southborough, MA. He has written extensively on the subject of metal detecting since the mid 1980’s. He has traveled world-wide in his pursuit of educating, exploring and advising others in the proper use of metal detectors. Outside of the business he enjoys mentoring students, being involved in the community and spending time with his family.

photo credit: dad1_ via photopin cc


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Smashed brick wall: Prominent Busse and Froemling families of Chicago.

Smashed brick wall: Prominent Busse and Froemling families of Chicago.

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There’s nothing like the feeling of solving a mystery like the one about the biological family of my husband’s grandmother Louise Reynolds. Born in October of 1911, she was given up for adoption.

A wonderful couple, William Dennis Matthews and his wife Claudia adopted her and a little boy, William Dennis Matthews, Jr.

 

The Matthews family: adopted Louise Froemling, biological granddaughter of prominent Busse and Froemling families.
The Matthews family: William, William Jr., Louise and Claudia.

She grew up never knowing about her biological family. After her death, however, papers and artifacts were discovered in an old suitcase and among them were notes written in Louise’s own hand about her research into her biological family, which turned out to include the prominent Busse and Froemling families of Chicago.

No one knew she was even interested, much less pursued it. I guess it shouldn’t be a surprise, though.

Louise's Notes
Louise’s notes.

She used this information to order a copy of her birth registration below.

Froemling, Louise Ruth - Birth Record
Froemling, Louise Ruth – Birth Record

This small clip of paper consists of the notes taken by Louise while researching her birth.

I located the actual family quite a while ago through censuses and other documents.

Since then, I managed to expand on that information to include the fact that, based on her biological mother being recorded as Emma Mary Froemling.

Born 29 December 1884 in Illinois, Emma’s parents (Louise’s biological grandparents) were August and Johanna (Busse) Froemling.

August was born 17 Aug 1855 to Henry and Caroline Froemling.

Johanna was born 2 Aug 1855 in Elk Grove, Cook County, Illinois, and her parents were Christian and Fredericka (Henjes) Busse.

Busse, Christian and Fredericka (Henjes) Busse.
Tombstone of Christian and Fredericka (Henjes) Busse.
Busse, Christian; Obituary w photo.
Obituary of Christian Busse from The Chicago Daily Herald of 26 Mar 1909.

I have placed images of the tombstones for August and Johanna (Busse) Froemling and Christian and Fredericka (Henjes) Busse.

August died 20 Jan 1919 in Cook County, Illinois and Johanna died 19 Feb 1940 at Elk Grove.

Christian Busse died 24 Mar 1909 in Elk Grove and Fredericka died in 8 Sep 1911, also in Elk Grove, Illinois.

Considering that almost everything of importance in this family took place in Elk Grove, it’s a great example of how large a world it was for small farming families such as the Busse’s and Froemlings – and how hard it was for them to travel or move very far from home.

Busse, Friedrich and Johanna.
Johanna and Johann Hermann Friedrich Busse, c. 1876.

While researching newspaper articles for another family related to my husband, Mark, I happened upon a treasure trove of articles about all of these members of his family.

Busse, Johann and Hanna - Tombstone.
Tombstone of Johann and Hannah Busse.
Froemling, August and Johanna - Tombstone
Tombstone of August and Johanna Froemling.

I have included the most enlightening of them here.

As I actually clipped over two dozen, it seemed appropriate to whittle those down to just the most important and informative clippings.

The clips range from business ads to wedding announcements, death notices, obituaries, gossip column entries and newspaper articles.

What I have learned about this family from these newspaper clippings is that they were considered to be of good German stock, having settled in and pioneered the area of Elk Grove, Cook County, Illinois.

Busse; Car Delivery
Description of William Busse and his son delivering a new car to a customer as printed in The Daily Herald of Chicago of 23 Apr 1915.

An interesting fact about the Busse and Froemling families is they were well entrenched in transportation sales of one sort or another.

Busse; Elk Grove Draft Horse Co.
Elk Grove Draft Horse Co. ad from The Daily Herald (Chicago, Illinois), of 23 Feb 1906.

Their business interests spanning the fading of the horse as transportation and the inception of the automobile – as indicated in these two advertisements.

Christian was a Republican and served his community in numerous capacities including on the State Board of Equalization, Supervisor of Elk Grove.

The patriarch of the family, Johann Friedrich Busse and his wife Johanna (Hanna), immigrated with Christian and two of Christian’s brothers and two sisters, one brother having previously immigrated on his own.

Froemling, Oltrogge Wedding
Busse-Oltrogge as described in the 27 Dec 1918 article of the Chicago Daily Herald.

Christian was a Republican who served his community in numerous capacities including on the State Board of Equalization, Supervisor of Elk Grove.

Busse, Froemling Wedding; 1905 1 - Small Clip
Busse, Froemling Wedding; 1905 1 – Small Clip

His son August was the grandfather of my husband’s Grandma Louise Reynolds as mentioned above.

There is frequent mention of some of August’s children in numerous of the dozens of clippings I’ve saved.

Tidbits of information include illnesses, school news, work history, social activities, etc.

The most prominent of these occasions, of course, were the weddings.

The Oltrogge – Froemling wedding was the marriage of August’s daughter Selma and John Oltrogge.

Busse, Albert and Schaeffer, Emma; Marriage Announcement
Marriage of Martha Froemling and Albert E. Busse, taken from The Daily Herald (Chicago, Illinois) 6 Oct 1915.

County Commissioner William Busse was the son of Christian’s brother Louis, and led a very distinguished career and professional life.

Besides his high profile life and career, he ran a highly contested (and some say crooked) race for Mayor of Chicago.

I will write later this week about this race and the no holds barred lawsuit it led to.

Here are two wedding announcements published by William Busse.

One is the announcement of the marriage of his son Albert E. Busse to Emma Schaeffer.

The second is concerning the marriage of his daughter Martha to Albert Frederick Froemling, the son of August Froemling.

It appears they liked to keep it in the family.

Froemling, Harvey; Death from AppendicitisIn 1916, August Froemling’s grandson, son of Albert Frederick and Martha, died of appendicitis.

Sadly, August Froemling passed on 20 Jan 1919 and this is his obituary from The Daily Herald of Chicago.

It is not clear what the reasons are, but soon after, his 31 acre farm was put up for auction, scheduled to sell 10 Jul 1920.

Froemling, August; Obituary; August 1919
Obituary of August Froemling from the Daily Herald of Chicago of 31 Jan 1919.
Froemling; Farm Auction
Article from the Daily Herald of Chicago, announcing the auction of the farm of August Froemling after his death. The sale took place 9 Jul 1920.

There is no evidence of financial troubles in the newspaper accounts I’ve collected. Therefore, I can only assume the sale was to abide by his will and was to be divided among his immediate family.

I’d love to find his will to either prove or disprove my assumption.

____________________

You may also be interested in checking out these related posts:

____________________

The images above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Society at Richmond, The Washington Post, March 28, 1915

Transcription: Society at Richmond, The Washington Post, March 28, 1915

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Although this article from the Washington Post Society Column of March 28, 1915 does not mention any individuals I am researching, it is on a newspaper page copy that does. I am posting the transcription of this and numerous other articles from this page as it is a wealth of names and information of society at Richmond, Virginia.

 

Washington Post Society Column of March 28, 1915
Washington Post Society Column of March 28, 1915

The following is a transcription from a very poor quality copy of the Washington Post of March 28, 1915. Every effort has been made to accurately decipher the text, but where this was not possible the text has been represented below by [???an ?. ?????], as an example. In many instances, it’s impossible to even decipher the quantity of letters and/or numerals and/or punctuation. The number of ‘?’ is not a literal representation of the number of characters missing, but a general representation of the size of each segment of text that is visible yet indecipherable.

The original image of the entire page can be accessed by clicking on this image.

—————————————————————————–

Transcription, The Washington Post, March 28, 1915

SOCIETY AT RICHMOND

Prominent Women Form Club to Study Horticulture

GAYETY IN SPITE OF LENT

Many Little Parties Enliven the Season. Miss Anita I. Cussen to Wed Dr. A. A. Marsteller — Plans for the Richmond Blues’ Bazaar — Society Enjoys Reading by English Poet Alfred Noyes.
Special in The Washington Post.

Richmond, Va., March 27. — A club was organized this week by a number of society women, which promsies many interesting gatherings this spring. It is in the Garden Club. Mrs. Malvern C. Patterson is president; Mrs. William R. Massie, first vice president; Mrs. John Skelton Williams, second vice president; Mrs. Oliver J. Sands, secretary, and Mrs. Hugh Taylor, treasurer. The first meeting of the new organization took place on Tuesday, and was addressed by Miss Jane B (or R.) Haines, of Washington. The next meeting is to be held within two weeks in the home of Mrs. George Ben Johnston. The aim of this organization is to promote agriculture and horticulture. All members are owners of country estates or suburban places. The charter members are: Mrs. W. A. Witherspoon, Mrs. St. George Anderson, Mrs. Robert H. Talley, Mrs. N. D. Sills, Mrs. John W. [??????], Mrs. William H. Habliston, Mrs. Benedict T. Johnson, Mrs. Frank Rivers, Mrs. Edgar Taylor, Mrs. Frank [R]obson, Mrs. [D.] R. Midy[ette], Mrs. Alice [??????] Beresford, Mrs. T. S. Wheelwright, Mrs. Thomas Jeffress, Mrs. A. [?] Patterson, Mrs. R. [or B.] R. [or B.] Morgan, Mrs. William Robins, Miss Sallie Archer Anderson, Mrs. Thomas C. Gordon, Miss Carrie C. [?????], Mrs. J. Scott Parrish, Miss Mary Williams, Mrs. Frank Tow[?], Mrs. Coleman Wortnam, Mrs. Gordon Wallace, Mrs J. Stewart Bryan and Mrs. Jonathan Bryan.

Mrs. William Graham Gwatkin has posted invitations for the marriage of her niece Miss Anna Irene Cussen, to Dr. A. A. Marsteller, the ceremony to take place on Thursday evening, April [?], at [?? ?? ??? ????] in Mrs. Gwatkin’s home. This is to be one of the most [???????? ?? ??? ?????] weddings.

[?? ??? ?? ???? ??? ????] parties are being [???????? ????] of the most attractive homes [?????? ????? ????] Wednesday evening in the [?????????? ????], given by a number of [??ing] people. The members [????? ??] and Mrs. Lewis G. Larus, Mrs. and Mrs. John [?????], Mr. and Mrs. Charles [?.] Barnesdale, Dr. and Mrs. [?????] Morgan, Mrs. and Mrs. J. Hampd[??] [??????????], Miss Martha Robinson, Miss May Moore, John P. Lea, E. [?.] Syd[???], and William [?am].

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Morgan and their son Samuel [?.] Morgan, Jr. returned home this week after a two months’ stay [?? ????? ????] and Mrs. George Ben [???????] and Miss [????] R. Roy Jonston have a [????????] to town after  a [????? ?? ??????] Florida.

Mr. and Mrs. William H. White and Miss [E????? ???? White returned yesterday from Atlantic City, where they [??? ?? ? ????? ?????].

Mrs. Theodore [?.} [W???wag], of Philadelphis is the [?????] of Mrs. E. [?.] Hotchk[???] [???] is being much entertained.

[???? ???? ????? ??????] and Mrs. Brown are among the [????] arrivals in San Francisco, where they will attend the exposition and witness the polo tournament. Mrs. Brown is a daughter of Sen. [???????] Lee.
Mrs. [????? ????], Walter and Mrs. Rob[?????] [????? ??? ??] Washington.

One of the most fashionable events of the [?? ??????] was the reading given last night in the Jefferson auditorium of [??? ???? ????], the English [????] among [?? ??????????] present [???] evening [???]. Mrs. John Stewart [B????], Mrs. [????] [??] Anderson, Mrs. [????? ??????], Mrs. Thomas Blakney [?????], Mrs. [?? ??? ??????, ??], Mrs. [??????? ?? ??????], Mrs. William Raffin [???], Mrs. T[???? ?. ?????], Mrs. J. [?????? ??????], Mrs. John A. Coke, Mrs. George [?????????], Mrs. Frank Duke, Mrs. William [?. ??????], Mrs. Roy M. Jones, Mrs. Thomas [????] Johnston, Mrs. J. [?????????], Mrs. J. Arthur Lefroy, Mrs. [?.] T. [?.] Myers, Mrs. J. [?.] Metcalf, Mrs. [?. ??????????] Pinckney, Mrs [??????? ???????], Mrs. George [???? ????], Mrs. Wallace R. Thomas, Mrs. E. B. [????????], Mrs. Barton Wise, and Mrs. Wallace H. Wh[???].
Mrs. T[????] B[????] of Alexandria, who has been visiting her parents, the Rev. and Mrs. [??????? ?.] Mason, in this city, has returned to her home.

Mrs. William Russell and Mrs. L. R. MacVeigh are guests of Mrs. Charles [?.] Senff, in Washington.

Mrs. James William Hall, of San Francisco has arrived to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. [?. ?] [??]son.

[???? ??????? ?? ??????] of the big [??????? ?? ?? ????? ??????], which is [?? ?????? ??? ???] Wednesday evening. [???? ?? ? ? ? ??? ? ???]chins and Mrs. [?  ????? ??????? ??].

[?????] of the second [???? ????] will be a [???? ??? ????? ? ?????] of L. R. [?????] [??  ? ?] of girls, dressed as [??????? ???? ????? ??????, which will be [????? ?? ?? ??? ???]enty, and [????? ?? ????? ?] will be Misses Emily Royall, Harriet Guan, Jennie May Boice, Elizabeth Taylor, Camilla Wellford, Anne Royall, Je[???] Scott, Elsie Parrish and Julia Cone.

Mrs. Ramage, of Oil City, Pa., is visiting her daughter, Mrs. H. Logan Golsan. Mrs. and Mrs. Garnett Tabb have returned after spending several weekin in Pinehurst, N. C. Mrs. James R. V. Daniel has returned after spending three months in Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Horace Buchanan, who have been spending the winter in Richmond, will open their home on James River next week. Mrs. Bradley S. Johnson is visiting Mrs. John P. Poe in Baltimore. Miss Ellen Ball has returned to her home at Westhampton after spending two months in New York. Mrs. Archer Hobson, of Alabama, is visiting Mr. Hobson’s mother here. Mrs. Merritt Crenshaw and Miss Virginia Crenshaw have returned home after spending two months in Florida. Mrs. Douglas Searson has been visiting Mrs. Walter Christian prior to her departure for Europe to join her aunt, Frau von Suelow, in Germany. William Stuart, of the University of Virginia, has recently spent several days at the executive mansion with his uncle, Gov. Stuart.


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Transcription: Hyattsville Society, The Washington Post, March 28, 1915

Transcription: Hyattsville Society, The Washington Post, March 28, 1915

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The following is a transcription from a very poor quality copy of the Washington Post of March 28, 1915.

Every effort has been made to accurately decipher the text, but where this was not possible the text has been represented below by [???an ?. ?????]. In many instances, it’s impossible to even decipher the quantity of letters and/or numerals and/or punctuation. The number of ‘?’ is not a literal representation of the number of characters missing, but a general representation of the size of each segment of text that is visible and readable.
____________________

 

Hyattsville Society article, Washington Post, March 28, 1915.
Hyattsville Society article, Washington Post, March 28, 1915.

Transcription, The Washington Post, March 28, 1915

Hyattsville Society

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Brewer will leave shortly for their new home near Cherrydale, Va.

The Misses Grace and Helen McIntyre of Louisville, Ky., are visiting friends near Chettenham.

Mr. and Mrs. W. Graham Iglehart, of Baltimore, have been visiting the latter’s relatives near Chill[to]n.

Dr. Albert Scott Harding, of Newark, N. J., and Mr. Bruce Harding, of Syracuse, N. Y., have been visiting relatives near Upper Marlboro.

Miss Katherine Righter, daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. S. Ward Righter, formerly of this place and now of East Orange, N. J., will spend the Easter holidays as the guest of Miss Dorothy Holden.

Mrs. William G. Maudsley, of Seabrooke, is visiting friends and relatives in Washington.

Mrs. Frank L. Jones, of lower Prince Georges county, visited friends here during the week.

Miss Elizabeth Works, of Philadelphia, has been visiting friends near Woodmore, in the lower section of Prince Georges county.

Mrs. Thomas J. Lancaster, of Boston, Mass., has been visiting friends near Chillum, in the upper section of Prince Georges county.

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Berry and family, who have been spending the winter months in Washington, will return to their country home near Forestville, next month.

Samuel P. Hyatt, of Mitchellsville, has been visiting friends and relatives here in Washington.

J. Lee [D.] [???]it, of Upper Marlboro, has been visiting relatives here.

Masters Richard and Otway Zantzinger return Sunday morning to resume their studies at the Tome Institute, Port D[eposi]t, Maryland.

Miss Carrie Tydings, of Westminster, Md., has returned after a visit to friends near Seat Pleaasant.

Dr. and Mr. Albert R. Hyatt, of Washington, have been visiting Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Wells.

The Misses Lillian and Margaret Grange, of Newport News, Va., have returned after a visit of several to friends here and in Washington.

Mr. and Mrs. Jackson H. Ralston, who have been spending the winter months in Washington, will return to Hyattsville about April 15.

Town Treasurer William A. Shepherd has returned from a trip to Pittsburgh and New York city.

A dance was given in the Knights of Pythias Hall Thursday evening, under the management of a committee from the Berwyn Five Hundred Club. About [???] guests were present.

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To download the article image, right click on the image above.


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Transcription: Tombstone of Clayton William Blythe and Erwin Oliver Blythe

Transcription: Tombstone of Clayton William Blythe and Erwin Oliver Blythe

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Tombstone of Clayton and Erwin Blythe
Tombstone of Clayton Blythe and Erwin O. Blythe.

 

 

BLYTHE

(Left Side)
Father
Clayton
1883-1943

(Right Side)
Son
Erwin O.
1911-1927

Irving Park Cemetary, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.



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Transcription: Tombstone of Christian Biller (1792-1873)

Transcription: Tombstone of Christian Biller (1792-1873)

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Christian Biller was buried in the Tomahawk Pond Cemetery (aka Antioch, Barb Schoolhouse, Biller-Estep Cemeteries) in Shenandoah County, Virginia, United States.

 

Tombstone of Christian Biller
Tombstone of Christian Biller (1792-1873)

 

Transcription:

Christian Biller
Born Dec. 17, 1792
Died Aug. 15, 1873
Aged
80 yrs 8 mos & 29 days

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: In Memoriam for Philomène Bisson (1839-1919)

Transcription: In Memoriam for Philomène Bisson (1839-1919)

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A LA DOUCE MEMOIRE DE Dame PHILOMÈNE BISSON

In Memoriam for Philomène Bisson.
In Memoriam for Philomène Bisson.

 

 

 

 

Epouse de FEU SIEUR NARCISSE GRÉGOIRE
Décédée à St Sauveur de Québec, le 25 décembre 1919, a l’age de 80 ans.
———————-

Mon Dieu j’ai achevé ma course, mon pèlerinage est terminé ; j’ai consommé l’oeuvre que vous m’aviez conflée et maintenant je retourne à vous a fin de vous aimer et de vous prier avec plus d’amour et de ferveur pour ceux qui vont demeurer après moi.

Maintenant que la mort a fermé ma paupière que le dernier chant du prètre du Seigneur s’est fait entendre que la terre a convert mon corps, vous tous que j’ai aimés priez pour moi.

J’implore les prières et les bonnes oeuvres de tous ceux qui mònt connue et aimée.

Une communion, une prière pour aider à mon àme de s’élver vers les cieux.

Ph. gingras, photo., Québec.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

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As I’ve written in previous posts, much of human history has involved the management of relationships, marriages, etc. to safeguard against incestuous relationships, and has resulted in an impressive genealogy obsession in Iceland.
Genealogy obsession in Iceland
Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

Iceland, with its population of only 320,000, is one small corner of the globe that still deals with the issues of living in the shallow end of the gene pool, manifesting in today’s Icelanders’ preoccupation with genealogy and family history.

In one instance, a group of students from the University of Iceland engineering department created a smart phone app, allowing users to simply bump phones to see if they have a common ancestor, as well as if there’s a relationship and just how close it is.

Prior to the smart phone app, the “Book of Icelanders” (Islendingabok), has been the receptacle of genealogy records. Kári Stefánsson, an Icelandic neurologist, created a web-based version of the “Book of Icelanders” to provide constant access to its users. Kári Stefánsson and Fridrik Skulason claim to have documented 95% of Icelanders of the past three hundred years.

A benefit of the impressive job Icelanders have done tracing their family genealogies, is the extensive collection of data available for studies and experiments in many  disciplines including science, social studies, health and genetics.

Another example of the benefits of pursuing genealogy was described in my previous post “Owning a home: Military least likely and fire fighters more likely to own”. In this case, a statistical analysis of census data by Ancestry.com provided data to study home ownership trends over the past century.

Although the thoughts of the current and future benefits of genealogical study are pleasant ones, consider the negative – how would such caches of genealogical information have been used during WWII in Germany? The thought is truly frightening.

Previous posts about this topic are:

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is now available online. 

Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

The Science of husbandry on a human scale.

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


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Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

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I previously wrote an article about my fascination with the ‘science of husbandry on a human scale‘.

My interest in this subject was piqued by my own Acadian ancestry and the Acadians’ practice of ‘managing’ biological relationships through the church in order to safeguard against close relatives marrying and having children. This has been a necessity through the centuries as a result of people living in small communities that were widespread. The modes of transportation were primitive and substantially increased the possibility of relationships and marriages within family lines. The Acadians recognized these relationships as existing within levels of ‘consanguinity’ or ‘closeness of biological relationship’.

The culture that shares the this Acadian practice to the greatest degree is that of Iceland. They have taken their management of these relationships to a different and greater level through consultation with the Íslendingabók database, a national database of ancestral lines and family trees reaching back several centuries, with their incest prevention app.

Students of the University of Iceland in Reykjavík won a contest for apps run by the Íslendingabók database. With their Android incest prevention app called ‘Sifjaspellsspillir’ or ‘Incest Spoiler’, two people with the app just tap their phones and if they share a grandparent, they will receive an alert. The creators are hoping to make it able to alert regarding common great grandparents in the future.


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Transcription: Obituary for Clermont Boily

Transcription: Obituary for Clermont Boily

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Here is my transcription of the obituary for Clermont Boily.

Boily, Clermont - Obituary
Boily, Clermont – Obituary

Décés et fuérailles de Clermont Boily

(noted in handwriting: fils Cleophas 13)

A sa résidence, le 30 janvier 1983, à l’âge de 59 ans et 6 mois est décédé Clermont Boily, époux en premières noces de feu dame Irène Turmel et en secondes noces de dame Thérèse Leclerc (Mme Fernando Breton). Il demeurait au 617 rue Principale Saints-Anges, Cté Beauce.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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I’d like to see an open and free exchange of genealogical data.

I’d like to see an open and free exchange of genealogical data.

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Ideally, I’d like to see an open and free exchange of genealogical data.

I’ve long been a proponent of the open and free exchange of genealogy data to ensure ready access to information for everyone researching their family history.

This morning, however, I read “Cooperation Makes Records Available for Free” at FamilySearch.org and it made me think.

As much as I’d like all genealogical data to be free, I can understand someone wishing to recover their costs of researching the data.

Database profile for Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky, including references to numerous images, documents and sources. (Click on the image to see in full size.)

Although the costs of genealogy research have reduced considerably over the past two decades due to computers and the increasing availability of records, images and data online, we’re seeing a correlating increase in sites online offering valuable data for a fee of some kind, making free data harder to find.

FamilySearch.org is one of the few sites still offering data for free.

In my case, ALL of my data (including images, sources and documents) is available online for free download. I do not charge for anything. I do, however, make revenue from ad clicks and sponsored posts on my sites. The end result is that, at least at present, I can offer all of my data for free as the ads pay for the upkeep and maintenance of my sites – for the most part.

There is a delicate balance here, though. As long as I can afford to offer this information free of charge it will remain so. If there comes a point where I have to recover my costs, I will have to either charge for downloads or remove the site from the internet altogether. Rest assured that this is not anywhere in the foreseeable future.

I’ve also seen a marked increase in the amount of personal genealogy data online that is ‘locked’ or marked ‘private’. I have contacted the owners of such data and in most cases they have been very forthcoming and willing to exchange information. In a few cases, however, the owner can be very protective of their data and will not make it available. Luckily, these appear to be few and far between at present.

I welcome the exchange of data offered by anyone doing genealogy research. It is important that this information remain available. One caveat, however, is to ALWAYS categorize the data as it appears when received. If there are no sources attached, it is questionable at best and it is important to use this information as ‘clues’ to further finds. Do not take this information at face value.

I have a very large database and about half of the data is sourced, while about half is not. I am constantly actively seeking and adding sources to prove the data.

I have received some criticism for this. One researcher contacted me about a particular line of information because it was claimed I had a place name incorrect. Little did this person know I had lived in the area for 21 years and knew it very well. To say this person was hostile is putting it mildly. I couldn’t believe it when it was demanded that I remove the lines pertaining to HER RESEARCH as she was the researcher of this family and I had no business researching it since our connection was only by remarriage, adoption and the birth of half-siblings. She also demanded that I remove anything that was not sourced or proven. To do as she demanded would break up lines and create gaps, leaving me without clues to search for sources to prove the information I do have and fill the gaps.

As I stated above, a good portion of my data is accumulated through free exchange of information, including the import of gedcoms of other peoples’ research. The sources (or lack thereof) remain as they have cited them, but I do search for actual copies of listed sources to attach where possible. I leave unsourced data as I receive it until I can research it further and I categorize any sources I have confirmed or added.

It is important to realize that cooperation and goodwill among researchers is essential to keeping the lines of communication and free flow of information open. Once we start becoming territorial and protective of our data, we contribute to the scarcity of information and increased costs for all.

Again, although such data can be invaluable as clues to further research, it is important to note that all sources are only as good as the attachments and assessed quality.


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Transcription: Obituary for Lena C. Blythe (Cade).

Transcription: Obituary for Lena C. Blythe (Cade).

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This is my transcription of the obituary for lean C. Blythe (Cade).

 

Obituary of Lena C. Blythe (Cade)
Obituary of Lena C. Blythe

Obituary:

Lena Blythe

Mrs. Lena C. Blythe, 88, died Thursday in her home at 598 West County Road 38 after a lengthy illness.

Arrangements are pending at the Goodrich Mortuary.

Mrs. Blythe was born Feb. 15, 1888, in Gusse, Ind. She was married to Wesley E. Blythe on Jan. 25, 1917, in Covington, Ind. He survives.

They moved to Fort Collins in 1932 from Colorado Springs. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church and a charter member of Chapter Co of PEO here. She was a former member of Collins Chapter N. 26 of OES and Fort Collins Rebekah Lodge.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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